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Nekikolo from Tanzania raised $689 to fund a mass removal procedure.

Nekikolo
100%
  • $689 raised, $0 to go
$689
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Nekikolo's treatment was fully funded on March 30, 2019.
November 9, 2019

Nekikolo underwent a mass removal procedure.

Nekikolo had a successful surgery that helped remove the mass swelling she had on her left eyebrow. Due to this surgery Nekikolo is no longer going through pain due to the swelling and her self confidence had increased tremendously. She was looking forward to going back to school and let her friends see her new look without the mass.

Before Nekikolo left for home she said, “Thank you very much I can’t wait to go home and show my friends that am healed now.”

Nekikolo had a successful surgery that helped remove the mass swelling she had on her left eyebrow. Due to this surgery Nekikolo is no longe...

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March 3, 2019

Nekikolo is a student from Tanzania. He is is the youngest in a family of eight children.

When he was three months old, Nekikolo developed a swelling on his left eyebrow. As he kept growing, the swelling kept increasing in size.

Nekikolo traveled to our medical partner’s care center to receive treatment. On March 4, surgeons will remove the mass. Now, Nekikolo needs help to raise $689 to fund this procedure.

Nekikolo’s mother says, “Thank you very much for giving my son a chance to have treatment of his mass.”

Nekikolo is a student from Tanzania. He is is the youngest in a family of eight children. When he was three months old, Nekikolo develop...

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Nekikolo's Timeline

  • March 3, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Nekikolo was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare.

  • March 4, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Nekikolo received treatment at Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre (ALMC) in Tanzania. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • March 4, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Nekikolo's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • March 30, 2019
    FULLY FUNDED

    Nekikolo's treatment was fully funded.

  • November 9, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    We received an update on Nekikolo. Read the update.

Funded by 12 donors

Funded by 12 donors

Treatment
Mass Excision
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $689 for Nekikolo's treatment
Hospital Fees
$577
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$11
Supplies
$49
Labs
$52
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Broadly speaking, masses come in two types: benign (not cancer) and malignant (cancer). The types of tumors are many and could range from osteosarcoma of the jaw (a bone tumor) to thyroid enlargement to breast lump to lipoma (benign fat tumor), among others. The symptoms vary depending on the type of tumor. Not all tumors, cancerous or benign, show symptoms. A common benign tumor, such as a lipoma (fatty tumor), may cause local pressure and pain, or may be disfiguring and socially stigmatizing. An ovarian mass may be benign or cancerous and may cause pain, bleeding, or, if malignant, death.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If the tumor is cancerous, it is usually aggressive and invasive. If not treated (like certain skin cancers, for example) there could be great tissue destruction, pain, deformity, and ultimately death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

There are so many different kinds of masses so it is difficult to state what the significance is.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The process depends on the location of the mass and whether it is cancerous or benign.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

In the case of cancer, the procedure can be life-saving. In the case of benign tumors, patients can be free of pain or social stigma.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

If the tumor is cancerous, the surgeon will only try to remove it if the procedure would be curative. If cancer has already spread, then surgery cannot help. Most of these surgeries are not very risky.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few qualified facilities and surgeons to perform this procedure.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Alternatives depend on the type of tumor. If the tumor is cancerous, chemotherapy may help, but that treatment is even less available than surgery. If the tumor is benign, it depends on the condition but just watching the mass would be one option.

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Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Gatguon

Gatguon is an 8-week-old baby girl from a remote area of South Sudan. The civil war in South Sudan has made it difficult for many to access healthcare and treatment, including Gatguon's family. Gatguon was born with swelling in the back of her head. Upon referral to Old Fangak Clinic, the doctor diagnosed Gatguon with spina bifida, a type of neural tube defect in which the spine does not properly close around the spinal cord. Without treatment, Gatguon is at risk of lower-limb paralysis, infection of the exposed nervous tissue, development of tethered cord syndrome, and possible developmental delays. Gatguon urgently needs spina bifida repair surgery to correct the condition and reduce risk of infection. Unfortunately, this treatment is not available for her in South Sudan. Dr Jill Seaman and her team at Old Fangak Clinic facilitated Gatguon’s travel to Kenya – a long and difficult journey for a sick baby. Now, doctors at our medical partner's care center in Kenya will perform the surgery she needs. Gatguon’s parents have two kids. Her mother is a stay-at-home mom and her father is a vegetable farmer. They are hopeful that baby Gatguon will be treated and that they will continue taking care of her and loving her unconditionally. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping Gatguon's family raise $1,151 to cover the cost of spina bifida closure surgery. The procedure is scheduled to take place on April 20th and will hopefully spare Gatguon of further complications and allow her to grow and develop along a healthy trajectory. Gatguon’s mother shared, “We hope that our child will be treated.”

57% funded

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