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Success! Sopheak from Cambodia raised $423 to fund ear surgery.

Sopheak
100%
  • $423 raised, $0 to go
$423
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Sopheak's treatment was fully funded on December 24, 2019.

Photo of Sopheak post-operation

October 14, 2019

Sopheak underwent ear surgery.

Sopheak’s operation went well. Surgery will improve his quality of life by eliminating ear discharge and discomfort. Surgery is also important to ensure he does not suffer from hearing loss. His mom feels happy that he won’t have to miss any more school.

Sopheak said, “I am so happy that my surgery was successful and that I can hear clearly again and no longer have any problems with my ear.”

Sopheak's operation went well. Surgery will improve his quality of life by eliminating ear discharge and discomfort. Surgery is also importa...

Read more
September 4, 2019

Sopheak is a sixth grade student from Cambodia. He likes to study mathematics and geography, and hopes to become a police officer when he gets older.

Three years ago, Sopheak had an ear infection. This infection caused the tympanic membrane, or the ear drum, in his left ear to perforate. For this reason, Sopheak experiences hearing loss and discharge. He has difficulty hearing others and cannot focus well in school.

Sopheak traveled to our medical partner’s care center to receive treatment. On September 4th, he will undergo a myringoplasty procedure in his left ear. During this procedure, surgeons will close the perforation. Our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre, is requesting $423 to fund this procedure. This covers medications, supplies, and inpatient care.

“I hope that after surgery, my son will be able to hear again and will no longer have any ear discharge.” - Sopheak’s Mother

Sopheak is a sixth grade student from Cambodia. He likes to study mathematics and geography, and hopes to become a police officer when he ge...

Read more

Sopheak's Timeline

  • September 4, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Sopheak was submitted by Lindsay Bownik, Stakeholder Relations Officer at Children's Surgical Centre, our medical partner in Cambodia.

  • September 05, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Sopheak received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • September 09, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Sopheak's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • October 14, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Sopheak's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • December 24, 2019
    FULLY FUNDED

    Sopheak's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 10 donors

Funded by 10 donors

Treatment
Myringoplasty
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $423 for Sopheak's treatment
Hospital Fees
$78
Medical Staff
$344
Medication
$1
Supplies
$0
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A myringoplasty is the closure of the perforation of the tympanic membrane in the ear. This surgery is performed when a patient has a perforated eardrum, certain types of hearing loss, and chronic otitis media (middle ear infection). A bilateral myringoplasty will be performed when a patient has otitis media on both sides. Patients experience difficulty hearing and communicating, in addition to chronic infection and daily ear discharge.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

The patient has difficulty hearing and experiences daily pain and ear discharge. These symptoms make it difficult to attend school or work regularly.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Many people in Cambodia are unaware that medical help is available for ear, nose, and throat (ENT) conditions. In rural villages, if a young child has trouble hearing, it may be assumed that he or she is deaf. For this reason, that child may not attend school.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

A myringoplasty is the closure of the perforation of the tympanic membrane. The temporalis fascia is grafted. An incision is made along the edge of the perforation, and a ring of epithelium is removed. A strip of mucosal layer is removed from the inner side of the perforation. The middle ear is packed with gelfoam soaked with an antibiotic. The edges of the graft should extend under the margins of the perforation, and a small part should extend over the posterior canal wall. The tympanomeatal flap is then replaced.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This surgery will repair the perforated tympanic membrane, treat the infection, and stop the ear discharge. This operation has a high success rate of hearing improvement.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This surgery is highly effective with few risks.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Treatment for chronic ear infections is not widely available in Cambodia. There are only a handful of doctors in the country that will perform a myringoplasty, but their services are expensive. Children's Surgical Centre is the only affordable treatment option for patients coming in with chronic otitis media on one or both sides.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

The alternative to surgery is antibiotic ear drops, but they have a far lower success rate. Many people neglect their pain and discharge for years, until total loss of hearing becomes a reality.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Kyamatungo

Kyamatungo is a 74-year-old widow and a mother who shared with us that she had given birth to four children, but lost two of her daughters and she currently only has two sons. One of her sons is a plumber and another one is a primary teacher. She earns a living from her small farm of bananas from which she gets food and has to sell off some Matooke when she is in need of essential basic needs like salt soap and paraffin. At times she grows small gardens of beans and maize to feed her family. Kyamatungo came to the hospital with urine incontinence and persistent abdominal pain which she says started three years ago. She further shared that these and her other symptoms have exposed her to having a poor quality of life due to the discomfort she often feels whenever she is public. If not treated, the presenting symptoms may persist or worsen hence causing lifetime disease-related complications or possibly mortality. Kyamatungo had only ever been to Rugarama health centre IV, where she was examined and diagnosed with cystocele but doctors referred her to Nyakible Hospital for surgical treatment. She was not able to immediately come due to limited finances. At Watsi's Partner Nyakible Hospital, she has been seen by the gynaecologist for specialized examination, who has recommended surgery. Kyamatungo says: “I will thank you, people, and pray to God to bless you when am give a chance to undergo my surgery under your support. I hope my surgery will be successful so that I could be relieved from these pending symptoms.”

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Hla

Hla is a 41-year-old woman from Burma. She lives with her family in a village in Kawkareik Township in Karen State. Hla is a homemaker, raises livestock, and looks after her niece while her sister teaches at a nursery school in the village. Her two younger sons and her brother-in-law are subsistence farmers who grow rice on rented land. Hla’s oldest son is a distance education student in university. One year ago, Hla felt a painless growth when she touched her lower abdomen. That same day, she went to see a traditional birth attendant (TBA) about this. The TBA told her that she had a gastric problem. The next day, Hla went to see a traditional healer receive blessed water in the hopes it would make the growth disappear. Although she drank the blessed water for around two months, the growth remained. As she did not think that the growth would make her seriously ill, she did not go to a clinic. In January 2020, Hla felt like the growth was increasing in size. She decided to visit Kawkareik Private Clinic where the doctor performed an ultrasound. She was told that she had a mass in her uterus. The doctor provided her with painkillers and she was told to only take it when she is in pain. Hla has been experiencing back pain and the mass increases in size day by day. She has been diagnosed with a uterine mass and has been advised to undergo a total abdominal hysterectomy, the surgical removal of her uterus and cervix. If left untreated, Hla's symptoms will continue to worsen and put her at risk for further health complications in the future. Fortunately, Hla is scheduled to undergo her hysterectomy on March 13th. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Once recovered, she will no longer experience back pain and she will be able continue working and helping out at home. Hla said, "I'm very scared when I heard that I need to receive surgery. When I got home, my family and friends encouraged me to not be afraid because there were many other people who had the same condition who recovered and became healthy again."

79% funded

79%funded
$1,196raised
$304to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Kyamatungo

Kyamatungo is a 74-year-old widow and a mother who shared with us that she had given birth to four children, but lost two of her daughters and she currently only has two sons. One of her sons is a plumber and another one is a primary teacher. She earns a living from her small farm of bananas from which she gets food and has to sell off some Matooke when she is in need of essential basic needs like salt soap and paraffin. At times she grows small gardens of beans and maize to feed her family. Kyamatungo came to the hospital with urine incontinence and persistent abdominal pain which she says started three years ago. She further shared that these and her other symptoms have exposed her to having a poor quality of life due to the discomfort she often feels whenever she is public. If not treated, the presenting symptoms may persist or worsen hence causing lifetime disease-related complications or possibly mortality. Kyamatungo had only ever been to Rugarama health centre IV, where she was examined and diagnosed with cystocele but doctors referred her to Nyakible Hospital for surgical treatment. She was not able to immediately come due to limited finances. At Watsi's Partner Nyakible Hospital, she has been seen by the gynaecologist for specialized examination, who has recommended surgery. Kyamatungo says: “I will thank you, people, and pray to God to bless you when am give a chance to undergo my surgery under your support. I hope my surgery will be successful so that I could be relieved from these pending symptoms.”

0% funded

0%funded
$0raised
$230to go