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Zaw is a 45-year-old from Burma who needs $1,500 to fund surgery on his infected foot so he can return to working.

Zaw
79%
  • $1,199 raised, $301 to go
$1,199
raised
$301
to go
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November 15, 2021

Zaw lives with his mother, two sisters, two nephews, and two nieces in Mon State in Burma. His mother is retired, and his youngest niece and nephew go to school. His niece works as a betel nut cutter with his two sisters, while his nephew works as a day laborer. Zaw cannot work right now due to the pain in his foot. In his free time, he enjoys praying to Buddha and watching movies, which also helps him feel better.

Around the end of September, Zaw developed pain in his left foot. A few weeks later, three of his toes turned black. Eventually, all of his toes, and his forefoot turned black too. When he went to Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH) a couple weeks ago, he was diagnosed with gangrene and was admitted to the hospital straight away. At first the doctor tried to treat him with oral medication, injections and physiotherapy exercises to increase the blood supply in his left foot. When this did not work, Zaw was told that the best option is to amputate his foot. Unable to pay for surgery, the doctor referred him to our partner Burma Children Medical Fund for assistance accessing further treatment.

Currently, Zaw is in a lot of pain. His left forefoot is black and swollen. As the pain is worse at night, he cannot sleep properly. He also has difficulty sleeping because he is worried about his foot and their financial situation.

“Once I have recovered from surgery and I have received a prosthetic foot, I want to support my family and become a taxi driver,” he said. “Thank you so much to the donors for supporting me. Every day I pray for them.”

Zaw lives with his mother, two sisters, two nephews, and two nieces in Mon State in Burma. His mother is retired, and his youngest niece and...

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Zaw's Timeline

  • November 15, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Zaw was submitted by Bridgitte Agocs at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • November 16, 2021
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Zaw was scheduled to receive treatment at Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital in Burma. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • November 17, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Zaw's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING FUNDING

    Zaw is currently raising funds for his treatment.

  • TBD
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Zaw's treatment update from Burma Children Medical Fund.

Funded by 25 donors

Funded by 25 donors

Treatment
Amputation
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $4,397 for Zaw's treatment
Subsidies fund $2,897 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$3,558
Medical Staff
$108
Medication
$2
Supplies
$158
Travel
$16
Labs
$20
Radiology
$5
Other
$530
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Diagnosis involves broken bones, pain, and swelling.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Broken bones lead to decreased mobility. Patients are unable to do their normal daily activities.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Most people in remote areas try to fix the broken legs/arms by themselves. People go to spiritual healers or traditional massagers for healing. Sometimes the broken bone heals, but not in the correct position.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After a series of x-rays, the doctor then decides on surgery.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Healing takes time, especially for bones. When the bones have completely healed, patients will be able to get back to their normal activities without pain and/or swelling.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Risks include allergic response, infection, malignancy (very rare), osteoporosis, and migration.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Since most of our medical partner's patients come from remote areas of Burma, the treatment is not easily accessible, as it is only available in big cities like Rangoon. Patients cannot afford the high cost of surgery.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

None. If the broken bones are not fixed, patients will have to spend their lives in pain. If the swelling turns out to be malignant then it will spread faster, costing the patient’s life.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Mu

Mu is a 17-year-old boy who lives with his sister in Mae Sot, Thailand. Before that, he lived with his parents, one older sister, two younger brothers and one younger sister in a refugee camp. His sister works at a non-governmental organisation helping others in need. Around mid-August, Mu woke up one morning with pain in his left knee. At first he thought that the pain would go away on its own and that it was nothing serious. However, when the pain remained a few days later, he told his sister about it. His sister bought him a type of Burmese pain reliever balm to apply on his knee. He applied the balm for a week, but he did not feel any better. When he and his sister noticed that his left knee had become slightly swollen his sister called their father. Mu’s father told them that it could be an ulcer and suggested that they go to a hospital or buy him pain medication to reduce swelling. His sister bought the medication their father had suggested at a pharmacy, and Mu took it for a week. However, he did not feel better, and the swelling did not decrease. Mu was able to have an MRI at Chiang Mai Hospital and now the doctor recommends he undergo surgery to remove a tumor on his left knee. Mu sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund and is now scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery on December 17th. He is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care which will enable him to get off of using crutches and back to feeling well again. Mu said, "After I heard from the doctor that my leg does not need to be amputated, I feel so happy."

81% funded

81%funded
$1,217raised
$283to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.