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Success! William from Kenya raised $1,286 to fund reparative surgery so he can continue school and do what he loves.

William
100%
  • $1,286 raised, $0 to go
$1,286
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
William's treatment was fully funded on April 4, 2022.
December 29, 2021

William is a cheerful, fun-loving boy. He’s a hardworking student in class four at school and enjoys reading and playing football. He is the fourth-born child in his family, and they live together in a two-room mud house in their village. William’s parents work as farmers.

William was born with clubfoot of his left foot, a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape. As a result, he has difficulty playing football (his favorite sport!), walking, wearing shoes, and it has impacted him going to school.

Fortunately, William traveled to the care center of our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH). On January 10th, surgeons at AMH will perform clubfoot repair surgery. After treatment, William will be able to walk easily, wear shoes, and play without any difficulty. AMH is requesting $1,286 to fund William’s surgery.

William shared, “I would be very happy to go to the field and play football without any problem and as well as continue with my studies.”

William is a cheerful, fun-loving boy. He's a hardworking student in class four at school and enjoys reading and playing football. He is the...

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William's Timeline

  • December 29, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    William was submitted by Edward Mugane, Impact Assessment Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • January 10, 2022
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    William was scheduled to receive treatment at AIC Cure International Hospital in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • January 14, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    William's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • April 4, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    William's treatment was fully funded.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting William's treatment update from African Mission Healthcare.

Funded by 9 donors

Funded by 9 donors

Treatment
Club Foot Correction
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $1,286 for William's treatment
Hospital Fees
$273
Medical Staff
$313
Medication
$179
Supplies
$396
Labs
$37
Radiology
$27
Other
$61
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The foot is turned inward, often severely, at the ankle, and the arch of the foot is very high. Patients experience discomfort, and the affected leg may be shorter and smaller than the other.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

These children have a difficult time walking and running. Years of trying to walk on a clubfoot will cause wounds and other skeletal problems, such as arthritis. Patients will have difficulty fitting in shoes and participating in normal play, school, and daily activities. Many Africans make their livings through manual labor, which can be difficult with an untreated clubfoot.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Incidence is 1/1,000 live births in Kenya. This is roughly similar to rates in Western countries, though many cases may be missed. There is no known reason for its occurrence in this region.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Patients will undergo a series of small operations, casting, and manipulations during their course of treatment.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The bones and joint will become aligned, and long-term disability will be prevented.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Clubfoot is very treatable. The surgery is minor and not risky.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Care is not easily accessible. AIC Cure International Hospital is one of the few pediatric orthopedic hospitals devoted to serving the physically disabled children of Kenya. Most parents bring their children from remote areas to seek treatment.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If not treated, the condition will persist and will result in disability.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

U Chit

U Chit is a 42-year-old husband and father from Burma. He lives with his in-laws, wife and son. His father-in-law works as a day laborer, while his wife and his mother-in-law are homemakers. U Chit used to work with his father-in-law, and also as a motorcycle taxi driver for extra income. However, he stopped working in January when his health worsened. When schools reopen, his son will begin kindergarten. A little over a year ago, U Chit began experiencing dizziness, fatigue, tightness in his chest and difficulty breathing when he exerted himself. A month later, he visited a local clinic where he was diagnosed with high blood pressure. However, in December 2021, U Chit lost a lot of weight and experienced night sweats in addition to his other symptoms. He was diagnosed with aortic valve regurgitation, mitral valve regurgitation and tricuspid valve regurgitation, and was placed on a waiting list to receive surgery. Because his condition is severe, the doctor recommended that he undergo surgery as soon as possible. Fortunately, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), is helping U Chit access treatment. On April 8th, he will undergo mitral valve replacement surgery at BCMF's care center. After recovery, his symptoms should improve. Now, he needs help raising $1,500 to fund his procedure and care. U Chit shared, "I gave up and I was ready to die before. There are a lot of heart patients waiting to receiving surgery. Since I heard that I could have surgery with the help of donors, I feel like there is hope that I will survive. I have to look after my family because my son is still young. I will always remember everything the donors did for me."

60% funded

60%funded
$913raised
$587to go
Ni

Ni lives with her mother & four siblings in Yangon, Burma. Her two younger sisters work in a clothing factory, while her mother and one brother are homemakers. Her other brother works as a driver assistant. Ni works in a factory that produces alcohol and in her free time, she enjoys watching television with her family. She also enjoys teaching English to their neighbor's children on the weekends. In July 2019, Ni started to experience chest pain and difficulty breathing. She went to a hospital in Yangon and was told she might have a problem with her kidney. When she did not feel any better after taking medication for a month, she went to another hospital in Yangon. She received multiple diagnostic tests and was told that her kidney is healthy but she has a heart condition. After receiving an echocardiogram, she was diagnosed with atrial septal defect (ASD). The doctor told her she would need heart surgery, but Ni told the doctor she could not afford to pay for it. Ni received medication and went back home. Unfortunately, she was unable to go back to the hospital for follow up because the hospital closed after the country's military coup. Due to the deteriorating security condition in their area, Ni’s family decided to go back to their village near Mandalay. Around her village, she could not find a pharmacy that sold her medication. When her family finally traveled back to Yangon she was feeling better and decided not to purchase more of the special medication she needed. Then in January, Ni felt like she could not breathe well, and experienced chest pain and rapid breathing again. She went to a hospital, where the doctor referred her to Pun Hlaing Hospital. After she undergoing more diagnostic tests, the doctor told her she would need to receive surgery costing 9,000,000 kyats (approx. $9,000 USD). When she told the doctor she could not afford to pay for it, the doctor gave her the phone number of a nurse who may be able to help. When Ni called the nurse, the nurse told her about our medical partner Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) who is now helping Ni access treatment. On March 13th she will undergo cardiac surgery to close the Atrial Septal Defect. Currently, Ni has chest pain and difficulty breathing. Sometimes, she has rapid breathing at night. She cannot sleep well because she is always worried about her condition. Ni shared, "I am very scared to receive surgery but if I do not receive this treatment, I will not live a long life. I am so happy to receive treatment and I would like to say thank you so much to all the donors."

77% funded

77%funded
$1,168raised
$332to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.