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Success! Ma Kyi from Burma raised $1,500 to fund an amputation.

Ma Kyi
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Ma Kyi's treatment was fully funded on November 5, 2018.

Photo of Ma Kyi post-operation

October 23, 2018

Ma Kyi underwent an amputation.

After surgery, Ma Kyi is no longer in pain. She is planning to return home and help out with housekeeping. She is very thankful to the donors who have helped her in receiving treatment.

Ma Kyi said, “Before surgery, my foot was very painful but now I feel better and peaceful. I think I can now help my family with the household chores. Because of the support from the donors, I now need not to worry for my treatment cost.”

After surgery, Ma Kyi is no longer in pain. She is planning to return home and help out with housekeeping. She is very thankful to the donor...

Read more
September 3, 2018

Ma Kyi is a 74-year-old woman who lives with her daughter’s family in Sanpya Village, Ye Township, Mon State, Burma. Her daughter and son-in-law are agricultural day laborers who work in nearby factories and rubber plantations.

In August 2018, Ma Kyi noticed that her right toe was swollen. She used traditional medicine, applying leaves onto her toe. A few days later, her toe became very painful. Consequently, Ma Kyi could not sleep at night and lost her appetite.

Ma Kyi visited our medical partner’s care center and was examined by the doctors. According to the doctors, the blood vessels in her feet are blocked, and the wound cannot heal due to the lack of blood supply. Thus, her doctors decided that the only solution is to amputate her right leg below her knee. Surgery is scheduled for September 4 and will cost $1,500.

Ma Kyi says, “As a Buddhist, I want to go to monasteries when I am fully recovered.”

Ma Kyi’s daughter adds, “I want my mother to get well as quickly as possible so I can go back home and care for my 11-year-old daughter.”

Ma Kyi is a 74-year-old woman who lives with her daughter’s family in Sanpya Village, Ye Township, Mon State, Burma. Her daughter and son-in...

Read more

Ma Kyi's Timeline

  • September 3, 2018
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Ma Kyi was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • September 4, 2018
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Ma Kyi received treatment at Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital in Burma. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • September 23, 2018
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Ma Kyi's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • October 23, 2018
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Ma Kyi's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • November 5, 2018
    FULLY FUNDED

    Ma Kyi's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 30 donors

Funded by 30 donors

Treatment
Amputation
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $4,397 for Ma Kyi's treatment
Subsidies fund $2,897 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$3,558
Medical Staff
$108
Medication
$2
Supplies
$158
Travel
$16
Labs
$20
Radiology
$5
Other
$530
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Diagnosis involves broken bones, pain, and swelling.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Broken bones lead to decreased mobility. Patients are unable to do their normal daily activities.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Most people in remote areas try to fix the broken legs/arms by themselves. People go to spiritual healers or traditional massagers for healing. Sometimes the broken bone heals, but not in the correct position.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After a series of x-rays, the doctor then decides on surgery.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Healing takes time, especially for bones. When the bones have completely healed, patients will be able to get back to their normal activities without pain and/or swelling.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Risks include allergic response, infection, malignancy (very rare), osteoporosis, and migration.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Since most of our medical partner's patients come from remote areas of Burma, the treatment is not easily accessible, as it is only available in big cities like Rangoon. Patients cannot afford the high cost of surgery.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

None. If the broken bones are not fixed, patients will have to spend their lives in pain. If the swelling turns out to be malignant then it will spread faster, costing the patient’s life.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Veasna

Veasna is a hardworking 42-year-old farmer and construction worker from Cambodia. He has two sons and two daughters, all of whom are students in public schools. To support their family, Veasna works as a small-scale farmer, and his wife sells vegetables at the local market. Veasna works construction jobs during the off-season to supplement their family's income. In his free time, he enjoys exercising, visiting his friends, and helping his wife with housework. Three years ago, Veasna underwent back surgery for sciatic pain, which led to a reduction in sensation in his feet. He stepped on a hot brick at work two years later and severely burned his left heel. Despite taking antibiotics, this wound has remained unhealed. The wound is currently producing discharge, which he shares is both unpleasant and painful. He is unable to walk on his left foot, preventing him from working. Veasna's wife now provides their family's sole income, and he shares that they are facing difficulty feeding their children and keeping them in school. When Veasna learned about our medical partner, Children's Surgical Centre (CSC), he traveled for two hours seeking treatment. On August 11th, surgeons at CSC will perform an excision of dead skin and a sural skin flap procedure to heal his wound and help him walk again. Now, he needs help funding this $673 procedure. Veasna shares, "I hope after surgery my foot will heal soon with no infection. I am hopeful I can walk without pain and can return to work to support my family."

0% funded

0%funded
$0raised
$673to go
Collins

Collins is seventh grade student and is looking forward to finishing his primary school studies. He is the second born in a family of three children. His father is a motorbike taxi driver but was involved in an accident and broke his hand and is now unable to work. Their family now relies on Collins' mother who does laundry work and house chores to earn a living for their family. Collins is a happy and talkative boy. When he was young, his parents noticed his health condition took him to a nearby hospital for treatment. There he was examined but was not able to receive care at that time. His parents were not satisfied and went to another hospital where they recommended surgery. His family has not been able to cover the cost and Collins has not yet been treated. Fortunately, their church pastor heard about Collins’ condition and referred them to our medical partner's care center, BethanyKids Hospital. Collins was diagnosed with cryptorchidism, a condition in which one or both of the testicles remains undescended. If left untreated, Collins has an increased risk of developing hernias, testicular cancer, and fertility problems in the future. Collins will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH). Fortunately, he is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on April 12th. AMH is requesting $646 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. Collins’ mother says, “I used to feel bad about myself previously as I could not afford to cater for my son’s treatment. Now I’m happy with the progress and what God is doing in Collins’ life. We hope for the best with the surgery.”

20% funded

20%funded
$131raised
$515to go
Prince

Prince is a 5-year-old and the youngest of three children. His father works at a construction site to help provide income for his family. In early February, Prince was on the school bus when the bus ran into a nearby shop. Prince was trapped between seats and became injured. He was rushed to a nearby health facility for first aid and underwent surgery. Two weeks later, he was referred to our medical partner's care center Kijabe Hospital for review. Prince then underwent a debridement and skin graft procedure in mid-February. Currently, Prince cannot walk and attend school, which is affecting his ability to move up in grades this year. Prince’s first two surgeries were paid for using his parent’s medical coverage, but the medical insurer turned down the current request for the surgery Prince needs to heal. Prince’s family shared that their trips to the hospital have exhausted their savings. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), can help Prince receive treatment. On May 25th, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure. This surgery will address any risks of infection so that Prince’s leg can heal and he can walk again and resume his studies. AMH is requesting $1,185 to help to fund this procedure. Prince’s father said, “Prince has missed school since February. He was supposed to graduate to grade one, but due to the injuries, he did not. He needs this surgery so that he can be able to walk again.”

66% funded

66%funded
$785raised
$400to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Veasna

Veasna is a hardworking 42-year-old farmer and construction worker from Cambodia. He has two sons and two daughters, all of whom are students in public schools. To support their family, Veasna works as a small-scale farmer, and his wife sells vegetables at the local market. Veasna works construction jobs during the off-season to supplement their family's income. In his free time, he enjoys exercising, visiting his friends, and helping his wife with housework. Three years ago, Veasna underwent back surgery for sciatic pain, which led to a reduction in sensation in his feet. He stepped on a hot brick at work two years later and severely burned his left heel. Despite taking antibiotics, this wound has remained unhealed. The wound is currently producing discharge, which he shares is both unpleasant and painful. He is unable to walk on his left foot, preventing him from working. Veasna's wife now provides their family's sole income, and he shares that they are facing difficulty feeding their children and keeping them in school. When Veasna learned about our medical partner, Children's Surgical Centre (CSC), he traveled for two hours seeking treatment. On August 11th, surgeons at CSC will perform an excision of dead skin and a sural skin flap procedure to heal his wound and help him walk again. Now, he needs help funding this $673 procedure. Veasna shares, "I hope after surgery my foot will heal soon with no infection. I am hopeful I can walk without pain and can return to work to support my family."

0% funded

0%funded
$0raised
$673to go