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Harriet is a farmer from Uganda who needs $284 to fund appendix surgery and return to farming to support her family.

Harriet
59%
  • $170 raised, $114 to go
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$114
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November 8, 2021

Harriet is a smallscale farmer and a mother of four. She was able to complete school up to the 6th grade, then could not proceed with education due to limited financial support from her family. Her husband is a casual laborer finding work where he can around their village. They own a two-room mud house for shelter.

Their family’s eldest is 13 years old and in primary school class three while the last born is 5 years old and in baby junior class. Harriet shared that sustaining her family has been hard for her and her husband. During her free time, she enjoys working on her farm whenever she is not doing her household chores.

About four months ago, Harriet began to experience troubling symptoms, including severe lower abdominal pains and immediately went to seek medical attention at Rushoroza hospital. She was diagnosed with a ruptured appendicular abscess. This is a complication of acute appendicitis which results from the invasion of the appendix by bacteria following an obstruction. It was managed and the doctors advised her to return after a while for appendicectomy but she has not been able to afford the surgery cost.

Currently, Harriet has completely stopped farming due to severe pain. If her surgery is not done, Harriet is at risk of suffering a recurring appendicular abscess and could live a very poor quality of life. Her family however cannot afford the surgery charges. She needs surgery to prevent her symptoms from getting worse.

Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping Harriet receive treatment. She is scheduled to undergo a curative laporotomy on November 11th at our medical partner’s care center. This procedure will cost $284 and Harriet and her family need your support.

Harriet says, “I hope to live a better life after the surgery because I have been in so much pain. I will resume farming as soon as I get better.”

Harriet is a smallscale farmer and a mother of four. She was able to complete school up to the 6th grade, then could not proceed with educat...

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Harriet's Timeline

  • November 8, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Harriet was submitted by Edward Mugane, Impact Assessment Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • November 11, 2021
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Harriet was scheduled to receive treatment at Rushoroza Hospital in Uganda. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • November 12, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Harriet's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING FUNDING

    Harriet is currently raising funds for her treatment.

  • TBD
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Harriet's treatment update from African Mission Healthcare.

Funded by 6 donors

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Profile 48x48 10714363 739039089511249 3116632349941804854 o
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Funded by 6 donors

Profile 48x48 animals bunny   honey bunny
Profile 48x48 10714363 739039089511249 3116632349941804854 o
Profile 48x48 tcc logo square with margin
Treatment
Curative Laporotomy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $284 for Harriet's treatment
Hospital Fees
$179
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$25
Supplies
$46
Labs
$20
Other
$14
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The symptoms would vary depending on the condition being treated. Most curative laparotomies are done for tumors or infections. Patients will have pain, weight loss, fever, and abdominal fullness. A curative laparotomy could address a range of abdominal conditions, such as an ovarian tumor, stomach cancer, liver cancer, cholecystitis, abscess, and others.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

It depends on the nature of the condition, but most curative laparotomies at Watsi's Medical Partner AMH Care Centers are done for tumors or infections. Patients will have pain, weight loss, fever, and abdominal fullness.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Dependent on the exact condition. Stomach ulcers, ovarian tumors, and cancer are increasingly becoming common in Africa.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Surgery lasts around three hours with the patient being discharged home after 3 days. They are continuously monitored in the hospital wards.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The procedure is done with the intent of removing the pathology and curing the condition.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Medium surgical risk, overall, the risk of surgery is less than the risk of doing nothing. If the condition is cancer and caught early enough, it is treatable. If the condition is benign, such as cholecystitis, then the laparotomy is curative.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality hospitals with adequate resources and expertise to treat most of the conditions that could be diagnosed by a laparotomy.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

For most abdominal tumors there is no alternative to removing them.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Mu

Mu is a 17-year-old boy who lives with his sister in Mae Sot, Thailand. Before that, he lived with his parents, one older sister, two younger brothers and one younger sister in a refugee camp. His sister works at a non-governmental organisation helping others in need. Around mid-August, Mu woke up one morning with pain in his left knee. At first he thought that the pain would go away on its own and that it was nothing serious. However, when the pain remained a few days later, he told his sister about it. His sister bought him a type of Burmese pain reliever balm to apply on his knee. He applied the balm for a week, but he did not feel any better. When he and his sister noticed that his left knee had become slightly swollen his sister called their father. Mu’s father told them that it could be an ulcer and suggested that they go to a hospital or buy him pain medication to reduce swelling. His sister bought the medication their father had suggested at a pharmacy, and Mu took it for a week. However, he did not feel better, and the swelling did not decrease. Mu was able to have an MRI at Chiang Mai Hospital and now the doctor recommends he undergo surgery to remove a tumor on his left knee. Mu sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund and is now scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery on December 17th. He is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care which will enable him to get off of using crutches and back to feeling well again. Mu said, "After I heard from the doctor that my leg does not need to be amputated, I feel so happy."

81% funded

81%funded
$1,217raised
$283to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.