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Success! Chorn from Cambodia raised $541 to fund burn treatment so he can use his right arm again.

Chorn
100%
  • $541 raised, $0 to go
$541
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Chorn's treatment was fully funded on February 23, 2022.

Photo of Chorn post-operation

March 11, 2022

Chorn underwent burn treatment so he can use his right arm again.

Chorn’s surgery went well! Specialty surgeons performed a procedure on his chest, arm, and ulnar nerve. Chorn will need to wear an arm sling and have his wound cleaned each day until his medical team sees new skin growth. He will also begin working with the physiotherapy team to reverse muscle atrophy. Although it may be several months before he is completely healed, Chorn shared that he is grateful for the opportunity to have this surgery. He hopes he will be well enough to return to farming to support his family soon.

Chorn’s wife shared, “I’m very happy Chorn has a chance to work again. The CSC staff was very nice and explained everything. We hope his pain will disappear and he can cook in the village and farm to help support our family. Thank you for your help to have this operation.”

Chorn's surgery went well! Specialty surgeons performed a procedure on his chest, arm, and ulnar nerve. Chorn will need to wear an arm sling...

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December 2, 2021

Chorn is a hardworking man from Takeo province in Cambodia. He has three daughters and ten grandchildren. He lives with his wife who is a farmer. In his free time, Chorn likes to play with his grandchildren and listen to the radio.

Chorn had an unfortunate electric burn on his right arm and chest last month. After the burn, his family took him to a local clinic for medication, but his wound has become infected. The skin on his right arm and chest has necrosed. Chorn has a loss of sensation on the fifth finger, the muscle has wasted away and he is in a lot of pain. He and his wife travelled two and a half hours to our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre, for a diagnosis and treatment. Fortunately, surgeons plan to do a debridement and exploration of the ulnar nerve on the right arm to help him. Chorn needs $541 to cover the surgery, inpatient care and medication.

After surgery, Chorn hopes his right arm will function and his wound heal soon. He shared how important it is for him to use his hand again to be able to work and feed his family.

Chorn is a hardworking man from Takeo province in Cambodia. He has three daughters and ten grandchildren. He lives with his wife who is a fa...

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Chorn's Timeline

  • December 2, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Chorn was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • December 2, 2021
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Chorn received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • December 7, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Chorn's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • February 23, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Chorn's treatment was fully funded.

  • March 11, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Chorn's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 14 donors

Funded by 14 donors

Treatment
Nerve and Tendon Repair
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $541 for Chorn's treatment
Hospital Fees
$87
Medical Staff
$406
Medication
$0
Supplies
$40
Labs
$3
Radiology
$5
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A number of nerve and tendon procedures are performed at Children's Surgical Centre. These are typically performed because a nerve is no longer fully functional. Reasons for this limited functionality can include lacerations, blunt trauma, burns, and tumors. Sometimes, spinal nerves are compressed due to herniated discs, bone spurs, and tumors.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

The patient cannot work or drive a motorbike, the most common form of transportation in Cambodia.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Traffic accidents, common in Cambodia, are the most typical cause of a brachial plexus injury (BPI), or damage to a network of nerves on the neck and shoulders. The inability to use a limb is debilitating for patients, whose livelihoods involve physical activity. They are often farmers, factory workers, or drivers.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

When a nerve no longer functions, the muscle that it innervates no longer functions. Surgeons either repair that nerve or use a nerve from somewhere else in the body to act as a graft. In some cases, a nerve can be redirected from a less important muscle and grafted into a more critical nerve. During a BPI surgery, surgeons divert a nerve from one destination and sew it into the non-functioning nerve. It can take three to six months before a patient fully recovers from this operation.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The patient will regain function in his or her arm. The patient can drive a motorbike and go back to work.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This surgery is highly effective. The nerve is already damaged, so there is no risk of causing more harm. The surgery can only improve function.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

This surgery is not available to most Cambodians. Patients travel up to twelve hours to visit Children's Surgical Centre (CSC). They learn about CSC from the radio, a neighbor, or a family member.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternative treatments to regain limb functionality.

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Collins is seventh grade student and is looking forward to finishing his primary school studies. He is the second born in a family of three children. His father is a motorbike taxi driver but was involved in an accident and broke his hand and is now unable to work. Their family now relies on Collins' mother who does laundry work and house chores to earn a living for their family. Collins is a happy and talkative boy. When he was young, his parents noticed his health condition took him to a nearby hospital for treatment. There he was examined but was not able to receive care at that time. His parents were not satisfied and went to another hospital where they recommended surgery. His family has not been able to cover the cost and Collins has not yet been treated. Fortunately, their church pastor heard about Collins’ condition and referred them to our medical partner's care center, BethanyKids Hospital. Collins was diagnosed with cryptorchidism, a condition in which one or both of the testicles remains undescended. If left untreated, Collins has an increased risk of developing hernias, testicular cancer, and fertility problems in the future. Collins will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH). Fortunately, he is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on April 12th. AMH is requesting $646 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. Collins’ mother says, “I used to feel bad about myself previously as I could not afford to cater for my son’s treatment. Now I’m happy with the progress and what God is doing in Collins’ life. We hope for the best with the surgery.”

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Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Shedrack

Shedrack is a 17-year-old teenager and the fourth born child in a family of seven. He had to drop out of school last year, but hopes to learn masonry at a local technical school so that he can work and make a living for himself. He is currently helping in looking after his family's cattle. His parents are small scale farmers, and his father also works as a night guard. His father shared that he can't yet afford to send Shedrack to the technical school. Shedrack was diagnosed with bilateral genu valgus. His legs bow inward at the knees. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, he has had difficulty walking for four years now. His father says the problem started with a slight curve but over the years the curve has increased in size. Shedrack's aunt learned about Plaster House - a special site that provides a home to patients undergoing treatment at our medical partner's care center in Arusha, Tanzania. She informed Shedrack's father who brought him there seeking treatment. Unable to raise the funds needed for surgery, their family is asking for support. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Shedrack. The procedure is scheduled to take place on May 6th. Treatment will hopefully restore Shedrack's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Shedrack says, “My legs hurt at the knees and carrying out daily life activities is now a big challenge.”

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