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Success! Pun Theary from Cambodia raised $648 to fund retinal detachment eye surgery.

Pun Theary
100%
  • $648 raised, $0 to go
$648
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Pun Theary's treatment was fully funded on March 10, 2021.

Photo of Pun Theary post-operation

March 16, 2021

Pun Theary underwent retinal detachment eye surgery.

Pun Theary’s surgery went very well! She was operated on by a specialty eye surgeon to repair her detached retina and help her see clearly again. After a short monitoring period, she was able to return home. She used eye drops eight times a day for the first week, then returned for a follow-up visit to ensure her eye was healing properly. She is feeling relieved that she did not lose her eyesight and is grateful to the doctors and nurses who were able to repair her eye. She’s now more hopeful for the days ahead.

Pun Theary's surgery went very well! She was operated on by a specialty eye surgeon to repair her detached retina and help her see clearly a...

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December 24, 2020

Pun Theary is a 59-year-old mother of four, with three sons, one daughter, and four grandchildren. Pun Theary sells fruit and her husband is a tailor. In her free time she enjoys watching Khmer movies on TV.

Her days have become more challenging since one year ago. The retina of Pun Theary’s left eye detached, causing her blurry vision, photophobia and tearing. She has difficulty seeing things clearly, recognizing friends, and going places on her own.

When Pun Theary learned about our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre, she traveled by motorcycle with her husband seeking treatment. On December 24th, eye surgeons will perform a retinal detachment repair procedure in her left eye. After her recovery, she will be able to see clearly. Now, she needs help to fund this $648 procedure.

Pun Theary shared with us, “For my business I need to have good vision. I want to see well again so I can sell my fruit and take good care of my children.”

Pun Theary is a 59-year-old mother of four, with three sons, one daughter, and four grandchildren. Pun Theary sells fruit and her husband is...

Read more

Pun Theary's Timeline

  • December 24, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Pun Theary was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • December 24, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Pun Theary received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • December 26, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Pun Theary's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • March 10, 2021
    FULLY FUNDED

    Pun Theary's treatment was fully funded.

  • March 16, 2021
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Pun Theary's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 23 donors

Funded by 23 donors

Treatment
Retinal Detachment Surgery
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $648 for Pun Theary's treatment
Hospital Fees
$67
Medical Staff
$256
Medication
$0
Supplies
$325
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Symptoms of retinal detachment include floaters in the field of vision, flashes of light when moving the eyes or head, and a curtain over the field of vision. Floaters are specks or globs that appear from clumps of citreous gel breaking down. Other symptoms are the appearance of a curtain-like shadow over the visual field, blurred vision, and reduced peripheral vision.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Retinal detachment is a medical emergency; living with retinal detachment can cause permanent loss of vision.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Surgical eye treatment is not readily accessible in Cambodia. The longer the retina remains detached, the lower the chances are of restoring good vision.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Treatment of retinal detachment involves surgery to reattach the retina. There are three main procedures by which this is done: pneumatic retinopexy, scleral buckling surgery, and vitrectomy. In pneumatic retinopexy, air is injected into the middle of the eyeball, which pushes the detached retina to the wall of the eye. This is followed by cryopexy to repair the tear. Scleral buckling surgery involves a piece of silicone material sewn to the outer layer or the eye, relieving the tugging on the retina. In a vitrectomy, vitreous gel is removed from the eye and air, gas, or silicone gel is injected in to flatten the retina. It may take several months for vision to improve.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This surgery is critical to prevent patients with retinal detachment from going blind.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

One possible risk is that the retina cannot be reattached because of scar tissue; if this occurs, the eye will ultimately become blind. The risk of complications from this surgery is small. These complications include bleeding in the eye, increased eye pressure, swelling inside the eye, clouded lens of the eye, double vision, and infection. There is also a risk of needing further surgery if new breaks form in the retina or scar tissue develops.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Patients in need of retinal detachment may travel from across the country to receive free surgical care at CSC, as alternatives are not available and surgical eye specialists are limited.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Retinal detachment requires surgery as treatment; without surgery, vision will continually deteriorate.

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Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Irine

Irine is a hardworking 76-year-old grandmother and widow from Kenya. She lives in a semi-permanent house and works as a small-scale farmer, growing food to feed herself. She receives other basic necessities from her children. Irine's home is located in an area with many hills, which become very slippery when it rains. One rainy day, Irine was doing her daily duties when she unfortunately slipped and fell. As she fell on the side of her hip, the load she was carrying also fell on top of her. She could not get up or move due to her right lower limb being in pain. Since she was home alone, she had to shout for help, and a neighbor eventually came to her rescue. A family member later took her to a hospital, where she was diagnosed with a fracture of her right femur. Irene currently experiences pain and is unable to use her leg. Although she was previously among the beneficiaries who received health insurance paid for by the government, the government eventually stopped providing payment. This meant Irine had to pay for her own monthly bill, a cost she could not provide. Due to financial constraints and not having insurance, Irine cannot fund her needed treatment. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On August 2nd, Irine will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. After the surgery, she will hopefully be able to walk and care for herself again. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,247 to fund this procedure. Irine says, "I know how my children struggle to earn a living. Kindly help me so that I may not be a burden to them.”

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