Thank you for helping create good news + good health in 2020 |  Read our 
Meet another patient

Watsi logo blueWatsi

Success! Rathanak from Cambodia raised $241 to fund tonsil surgery.

Rathanak
100%
  • $241 raised, $0 to go
$241
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Rathanak's treatment was fully funded on November 18, 2020.

Photo of Rathanak post-operation

December 11, 2020

Rathanak underwent tonsil surgery.

Our medical partner shared that Rathanak had a smooth and successful surgery. She is now back home with her family and no longer having sore throats or difficulty eating.

Her parents shared, “We are thankful to a whole of staff and people that worked hard in surgery for our daughter and we hope she will get healed.”

Our medical partner shared that Rathanak had a smooth and successful surgery. She is now back home with her family and no longer having sore...

Read more
October 7, 2020

Rathanak is 16 and lives with her three younger siblings and parents in Phnom Penh. She has two sisters and one brother. Rathanak shared a lot with us about her life and what she loves to do. She enjoys painting and watching TV when she is not doing her schoolwork. In accordance with Cambodia’s COVID-19 school schedule, she attends class every other week and her favorite subjects are Khmer, geography, and history. When she grows up she wants to be a lawyer. And, her favorite foods are green tea, chicken fried rice, vegetables, and Coke!

For the past four years, Rathanak has experienced recurring sore throats and fevers. In the last three months, these have worsened and swallowing has become painful for her. Her parents are feeling worried about her and hope this surgery can solve her problem so she can eat easily and not be in pain anymore. Fortunately, ENT surgeons at CSC will perform a tonsillectomy to treat her chronic tonsillitis and we are helping to raise $241 to fund her life-changing treatment.

Rathanak is 16 and lives with her three younger siblings and parents in Phnom Penh. She has two sisters and one brother. Rathanak shared a l...

Read more

Rathanak's Timeline

  • October 7, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Rathanak was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre, our medical partner in Cambodia.

  • October 07, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Rathanak received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • October 08, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Rathanak's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • November 18, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Rathanak's treatment was fully funded.

  • December 11, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Rathanak's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 2 donors

Funded by 2 donors

Treatment
Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $241 for Rathanak's treatment
Hospital Fees
$52
Medical Staff
$188
Medication
$1
Supplies
$0
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients with enlarged tonsils experience pain and difficulty swallowing. They may also wake up frequently during the night or experience sleep disturbances, such as apnea or snoring.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

The negative effects include recurrent rhinopharyngitis (common cold), throat infections, constant sore throat, sleep disturbances, and difficulty studying and working. Swallowing becomes very painful and labored.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Most people in Cambodia who require this procedure are from rural areas that have poor hygiene and little access to education. They frequently contract rhinosinusitis, pharyngitis, and tonsillitis. If patients do not have the money to seek treatment, they will often see a traditional healer instead. An incorrect prescription can cause a recurrence of the infection.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient is put on a course of antibiotics for one to two weeks to settle the infection. Under general anesthesia, each tonsil is removed by monopolar cauterization from a recess in the side of the pharynx called the tonsillar fossa. The bleeding is controlled and requires no suture. The total time required for the procedure is about one hour.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Patients will no longer experience recurrent infections. They will enjoy reduced pain and improved breathing and sleeping. Patients can return to school and work.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This condition is very treatable, and the operation is highly successful and effective.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few ENT (ear, nose, throat) specialists in Cambodia, and most are concentrated in major cities where services are costly. If patients cannot afford to travel and pay for treatment at hospitals in the city, they self-medicate with painkillers or visit Khmer traditional healers.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

The alternatives to this treatment are only short-term fixes to manage pain. If left untreated, throat infections can lead to more serious complications with other organs.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Naw Ree

Naw Ree is a 49-year-old woman from Thailand. Naw Ree has lived by herself in a refugee camp in northern Thailand since 2009. As a camp resident, Naw Ree receives 243 baht (approx. $8 USD) each month from an organization that supports refugee camp residents. She also works as a maternal and child health worker, receiving 900 baht (approx. $30 USD) per month. Naw Ree raises chickens and grows vegetables. Despite receiving free health care services in the camp, Naw Ree is struggling to make ends meet. On December 16th, 2020, Naw Ree went to see a woman who had recently given birth, to remind her about vaccinating her baby on time. After sitting and talking to the woman in her home, Naw Ree stood up to leave but felt light headed and fell. She put out her left hand to stop her fall, and hurt her left arm. She went to the hospital in the camp, run by Malteser International [MI] Thailand, and received pain medication and her arm was put into a sling. The next day, she was referred to Mae Seriang General Hospital for further treatment. At the hospital she received x-rays and the doctor told her that she had fractured one of the bones in her left forearm. She was then referred to Chiang Mai Hospital for further treatment, but her transfer was delayed for over two weeks due to an outbreak in COVID-19 cases in northern Thailand. Since Naw Ree lives by herself, she has to cook, wash her clothes, and feed her chickens without anyone's help, a difficult feat with her broken arm. Currently, she is in pain but has no fever. She can only fall asleep if she takes pain medication. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Naw Ree will undergo surgery to reset her fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for January 6th and will cost $1,500. After surgery, Naw Ree will no longer be in pain. She will be able to go back to work as a health worker and she will be able to complete her household chores without pain or discomfort. Naw Ree shared, "My greatest wish is that I recover and that I may be able to use my left arm again."

76% funded

76%funded
$1,152raised
$348to go
Su

Su is a 16-year-old girl from Burma. She has three siblings. Su’s mother is a home maker, and her older brother works as a day labourer. Su and her youngest sister are students and this year Su is in grade seven. Her family's combined monthly income is around 200,000 kyat (approx. 200 USD) per month, which is just enough for their daily expenses, but not enough to pay for basic healthcare. When she has free time, Su loves to play football with her friends at school and she likes to be the goalkeeper. She also loves to read books and watch movies. Su plans to continue her studies as soon as she finishes her treatment. Su was diagnosed with a heart condition that involves a malformation of the mitral valve, the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. Currently, Su still feels tired, but not as much as before she started taking her medication. When she feels more tired, her breath quickens. Su has stopped attending school since she got sick. Although she wants to go back to school, her mother worries for her as her school is a little far and she normally walks there. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Su. The treatment is scheduled to take place on February 12nd and, once completed, will hopefully allow her to live more comfortably. Su's mother shared, “Su really wants to go to school but I worry that the long walking distance from our house to her school will make her tired and worsen her condition. So, I asked her to stay home for a while until she can get treated.”

76% funded

76%funded
$1,148raised
$352to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.