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Success! Moo Wah from Thailand raised $1,485 for brain surgery.

Moo Wah
100%
  • $1,485 raised, $0 to go
$1,485
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Moo Wah's treatment was fully funded on July 2, 2016.

Photo of Moo Wah post-operation

July 19, 2016

Moo Wah received successful brain surgery.

After surgery, Moo Wah is more active and happier. He doesn’t cry a lot anymore, except for the usual reasons like hunger and tiredness. The size of Moo Wah’s head become smaller and his mother said that he can eat and play more.

“I hope my son will be able to sit, walk and develop like other children,” Moo Wah’s mother shared. “I want him to grow up well and go to school to become a pastor. Thank you so much for all the support from the donors who paid for the treatment and support for my family.”

After surgery, Moo Wah is more active and happier. He doesn’t cry a lot anymore, except for the usual reasons like hunger and tiredness. The...

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June 24, 2016

Moo Wah is a one-year-old boy who lives in a Thai refugee camp with his mother, Naw Lah. Naw Lah adopted Moo Wah shortly after he was born; his biological mother was abandoned by her husband during the pregnancy and could not care for Moo Wah in addition to her three other children.

Presently, Naw Lah is taking care of Moo Wah on her own; her husband moved to the United States shortly after they were married. Naw Lah is hoping to move with her son once her husband is settled.

Moo Wah was born with hydrocephalus - a condition that causes fluid to build up in the skull and put pressure on the brain. This causes vomiting, pain, and discomfort.

Even with the financial help from her husband overseas, Naw Lah sometimes has to borrow money from friends to get through the month. Moo Wah only drinks milk powder instead of breast feeding and Naw Lah is not able to afford his food in addition to his other medical expenses.

Naw Lah cannot afford the surgery Moo Wah needs, but without it he is very lethargic and irritable. He has had frequent fevers and requires constant attention. Naw Lah is physically and mentally tired from the frequent trips to clinics and hospitals and eager for her son to get better.

With $1,485, Moo Wah will receive the operation he needs to alleviate his symptoms. A surgical shunt will drain the excess fluid built up in his skull and alleviate the pressure on his brain causing him to be tired and irritable. With this intervention, Moo Wah will get a new start on life and the chance to lead a healthy childhood.

Moo Wah is a one-year-old boy who lives in a Thai refugee camp with his mother, Naw Lah. Naw Lah adopted Moo Wah shortly after he was born; ...

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Moo Wah's Timeline

  • June 24, 2016
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Moo Wah was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • June 25, 2016
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Moo Wah received treatment at Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital in Thailand. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • July 1, 2016
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Moo Wah's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • July 2, 2016
    FULLY FUNDED

    Moo Wah's treatment was fully funded.

  • July 19, 2016
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Moo Wah's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 21 donors

Funded by 21 donors

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Gebreegziabher

Gebreegziabher is a brave, young, and fun boy who loves to hangout with his friends. He loves to play chase and other games with his friends and brothers. He has five siblings and shared with us that he loves goats! Gebreegziabher never went to school because of his condition. He is a shepherd and helps to keep the sheep and goats of his parents. Because of his condition, he has endured bullying, but he continues to be brave and his dad shared: “He is so strong despite his sickness. When others pick on him and speak bad things about him and things related to his disease he even gets in to fights.” Gebreegziabher's mom and dad counsel him and comfort him and help him to bring out self-confidence and strength. His dad and his mom are farmers and his mom takes care of all the household chores. Dad said: “Our area is dry. We work hard and farm but the harvest is poor with lack of rain. We purchase food because our harvest is not enough to support the family.” They also raise animals to support themselves. The community survives with the dry land and the scarcity of food by donations from the government and NGOs. But the past two years they couldn’t get the donation since they are in the war zone. For these reasons they can’t afford the medical bill for their son. Gebreegziabher was born with congenital anomaly called bladder extrophy. That is an abnormally where the bladder is open to air. Given the pain and risk of infection, he just ties clothes around the wound. His mom is very much worried and concerned because of his condition. She shared that she has excluded herself from the community for years in taking care of him and raises him and recalls that when growing up, he would sit faraway from others and boys in his age. They keep up hope for better days ahead and are a loving family who support each other the best they can. His Dad said: “He learned to exclude himself from others growing up. We are sad as a family because of his condition. The neighbor insults us, discriminate us and we feel so sad about this. We couldn’t tell what will happen to him. And we bring him to God always.”

63% funded

63%funded
$954raised
$546to go
Him

Him is a 40-year-old woman who used to work in the market near her home. She is married to a rice farmer and has two sons and one daughter. Her sons are 15 and 12 years old, her daughter is 6 years old. Him enjoys cooking for her family, walking her daughter to and from school, and watching Khmer movies. She was a clothes seller at the market, but stopped after her injury. Last August, Him was in a traffic accident and fractured the bone in her right upper arm. She went to a government hospital for surgery to repair the bone. She left soon after the operation because they couldn't afford the cost to stay, even though her fracture had not yet healed well. Now she has an open wound, feels poorly, and cannot use her arm. A neighbor suggested Him visit Children's Surgical Centre for further treatment. She and her family traveled two hours to the hospital, where surgeons diagnosed a Volkmann contracture, which occurs when there is a lack of blood flow to the forearm. There is increased pressure due to swelling, a condition called compartment syndrome. Surgeons have determined they are not able to save her arm and plan to do an above-the-elbow amputation. The total cost of his procedure is $446, which covers medications, supplies, and inpatient care. The procedure is scheduled for March 10th and Him needs help to pay for this procedure. Him shared, "I hope after surgery I won't have pain or infection anymore. This treatment will help me in the future to work to support my family."

17% funded

17%funded
$79raised
$367to go
Pai

Pai is a 63-year-old woman who lives alone in a refugee camp in the border region of Thailand and Burma. She receives 350 baht (approx. $12 USD) each month on a cash card from The Border Consortium, to purchase food in the refugee camp. This support is just enough to cover her daily needs, since she sometimes shares meals with her sister. In June 2019, Pai first notice that the vision in both of her eyes was blurry. By late 2021, she could no longer see with her left eye. She then went to the hospital in the refugee camp, run by the International Rescue Committee (IRC). A medic checked her eyes, gave her some eyedrops, and told her that they would refer her to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for further follow up. IRC staff brought Pai to the hospital in January where the doctor completed a vision test and also checked her eyes with specialized equipment. The doctor diagnosed her with cataracts and shared that she would need surgery to be able to see clearly again. Currently, Pai can only see objects near to her with her right eye and even then, she cannot see objects clearly. She can only perceive light with her left eye. When she walks, she has to do so slowly to avoid stubbing her toes on stones and other objects. At night, she now needs someone to assist her to get around at all. She also has difficulty cleaning her house and doing other household chores like washing her clothes or cooking. She shared that when she tries to cook on her own, she will sometimes mixed up the ingredients now. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund lens replacement surgery for Pai. On February 22nd, doctors will perform a lens replacement, during which they will remove Pai's natural lens and replace this with an intraocular lens implant. After recovery, she will be able to see clearly. Now, she needs help to fund this $1,500 procedure. Pai said, “I do not want to depend on my sister as she has to look after her family too. However, now I have to depend on her for many things and I feel sad about this.” Pai is thankful to the donors who can help pay for her treatment cost. She is very happy that there will be a donor for her. She said, “I hope that I can see again, and I really want to see the donors and everyone at BCMF’s organisation who was willing to help me. Thank you so much for your kind support.”

79% funded

79%funded
$1,187raised
$313to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Gebreegziabher

Gebreegziabher is a brave, young, and fun boy who loves to hangout with his friends. He loves to play chase and other games with his friends and brothers. He has five siblings and shared with us that he loves goats! Gebreegziabher never went to school because of his condition. He is a shepherd and helps to keep the sheep and goats of his parents. Because of his condition, he has endured bullying, but he continues to be brave and his dad shared: “He is so strong despite his sickness. When others pick on him and speak bad things about him and things related to his disease he even gets in to fights.” Gebreegziabher's mom and dad counsel him and comfort him and help him to bring out self-confidence and strength. His dad and his mom are farmers and his mom takes care of all the household chores. Dad said: “Our area is dry. We work hard and farm but the harvest is poor with lack of rain. We purchase food because our harvest is not enough to support the family.” They also raise animals to support themselves. The community survives with the dry land and the scarcity of food by donations from the government and NGOs. But the past two years they couldn’t get the donation since they are in the war zone. For these reasons they can’t afford the medical bill for their son. Gebreegziabher was born with congenital anomaly called bladder extrophy. That is an abnormally where the bladder is open to air. Given the pain and risk of infection, he just ties clothes around the wound. His mom is very much worried and concerned because of his condition. She shared that she has excluded herself from the community for years in taking care of him and raises him and recalls that when growing up, he would sit faraway from others and boys in his age. They keep up hope for better days ahead and are a loving family who support each other the best they can. His Dad said: “He learned to exclude himself from others growing up. We are sad as a family because of his condition. The neighbor insults us, discriminate us and we feel so sad about this. We couldn’t tell what will happen to him. And we bring him to God always.”

63% funded

63%funded
$954raised
$546to go