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Success! Nay Myo from Burma raised $1,500 to fund spleen removal surgery.

Nay Myo
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Nay Myo's treatment was fully funded on May 1, 2017.

Photo of Nay Myo post-operation

March 14, 2017

Nay Myo underwent successful spleen removal surgery.

Since the splenectomy, Nay Myo’s condition has improved markedly. Prior to the treatment, Nay Myo had heart palpitations, fatigue, and joint pain. Now, he is more energetic and playful. Nay Myo is also sleeping better and put on some weight.

Nay Myo says, “Thank you for helping me and saving my life.”

Since the splenectomy, Nay Myo’s condition has improved markedly. Prior to the treatment, Nay Myo had heart palpitations, fatigue, and joint...

Read more
January 17, 2017

Nay Myo is a nine-year-old boy from Burma. He lives with his parents and has one older brother. Nay Myo’s parents work as day laborers. They cut grasses, plant vegetation, and collect bamboo shoots.

When Nay Myo was three months old, he fell very sick. He was subsequently diagnosed with thalassemia, a blood disorder characterized by an abnormal oxygen-carrying protein. Symptoms of this condition include fatigue, anemia, and trouble breathing. In order to treat these symptoms, Nay Myo has to receive oral medications and blood transfusions on a regular basis.

Thalassemia has also caused Nay Myo’s spleen to enlarge. After examination, his doctors decided to remove the spleen before other medical complications arise. On January 18, Nay Myo will undergo a splenectomy. Our medical partner is asking for $1,500 to fund the surgery.

Nay Myo’s mother is inspired by the caring hospital staff. She says, “I want Nay Myo to be an educated person and work like the staff.”

Nay Myo is a nine-year-old boy from Burma. He lives with his parents and has one older brother. Nay Myo's parents work as day laborers. They...

Read more

Nay Myo's Timeline

  • January 17, 2017
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Nay Myo was submitted by Ma Tu, Senior Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • January 19, 2017
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Nay Myo received treatment at Mae Sot General Hospital in Thailand. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • January 24, 2017
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Nay Myo's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • March 14, 2017
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Nay Myo's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • May 1, 2017
    FULLY FUNDED

    Nay Myo's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 29 donors

Funded by 29 donors

Treatment
Splenectomy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $6,081 for Nay Myo's treatment
Subsidies fund $4,581 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$3,648
Medical Staff
$1,291
Medication
$25
Supplies
$478
Labs
$130
Radiology
$167
Other
$342
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The patient has an enlarged spleen, causing him or her to need a blood transfusion. The patient is pale and fatigued.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients with thalassemia are usually chronically fatigued. They do not grow normally. Because of the need for frequent blood transfusions, patients spend less time at school.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Although patients can receive blood transfusions at all hospitals, there is only one center in Yangon that specializes in treating thalassemia patients. Patients who live far away have difficulty traveling there for a splenectomy.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Surgery will depend on the size of the patient's spleen and the patient's blood iron level. If a patient has received regular blood transfusions, his or her blood iron level may need to be controlled before surgery.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

After the surgery, the patient will not grow tired as easily. The patient will be more active and be able to eat and sleep well. In most cases, the patient will need blood transfusions less frequently. However, the patient must be careful. Once the spleen is removed, it cannot protect the patient from infections, so he or she can get sick more frequently.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Potential side effects include bleeding, blood clots, and infections.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many of our medical partner's patients live in remote areas. They cannot afford or access treatment because it is only available in large cities.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternative treatments. If the spleen grows very large, it can rupture, causing excessive internal bleeding that could lead to death.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.