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Success! Soe from Burma raised $1,500 to fund cardiac surgery.

Soe
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Soe's treatment was fully funded on December 23, 2020.

Photo of Soe post-operation

January 15, 2021

Soe underwent cardiac surgery.

Before her surgery, Soe felt very tired. She would cough a lot, had a rapid heartbeat, and had frequent bouts of fevers. Since her treatment, she is feeling so much better. She no longer feels tired and she no long has a constant cough. She feels like she can breathe better, and she can sleep soundly at night. She is able to play, eat, and walk without feeling tired. Soe is looking forward to going back to school soon.

Soe said, “I want to see my brother and sister who live in Burma and I want to play with them. I can’t wait to see my family in Burma!”

Soe’s mother added, “I’m very happy that my daughter received successful treatment. If she didn’t get treatment, she would not be alive today. Now, I can work without worry and support her education in the future. I would like to say thank you to all of the donors for helping us.”

Before her surgery, Soe felt very tired. She would cough a lot, had a rapid heartbeat, and had frequent bouts of fevers. Since her treatment...

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October 1, 2020

Soe is a 13-year-old from Burma. She lives with her parents and two siblings in a village in Taninthary Division. Her brother goes to school while her little sister is still too young to go. Soe was not able to go back to school this year, after she completed grade seven, due to her illness. Her father works as a tenant on Soe grandparents’ farm and gets to keep half of the harvest. Soe’s mother used to be a vegetable vendor but has stopped working to look after Soe.

In May 2019, Soe fell sick with a high fever and a severe cough. She was brought to a clinic where she received a physical examination. The doctor informed Soe’s mother that she has a heart condition and urged them to go to a hospital in Yangon. Her mother followed the doctor’s advice and took her to Bahosi Hospital in Yangon on June 25th, 2019. There she received an echocardiogram (echo), x-ray, and a blood test. After her results came in, the doctor diagnosed her with mitral valve regurgitation, a problem with one of the valves in her heart, and told Soe’s mother that she needs to have surgery that will cost 8,000,000 kyat (approx. 8,000 USD). Unable to afford her treatment, Soe instead received medication for the next four months. Although she took the medication, Soe did not feel better.

One day, their neighbor told them to bring Soe to another hospital in Yangon. Soe’s mother followed their advice and took her to Vitoria Hospital in Yangon. Soe received another echo, blood test, and an x-ray. A doctor at the hospital then told Soe’s mother to come back the next month, without explaining why. When they traveled back in January 2020 for her appointment, the doctor told them to meet a cardiac nurse at another hospital in Yangon. When meeting that nurse, she told them about Watsi’s Medical Partner Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) and that they may be able to assist her in accessing further treatment.

With the help of BCMF, Soe went to Chiang Mai in March 2020. She was admitted at Lampang Hospital on July 25th, 2020 and received surgery to repair her mitral valve two days later. She was discharged home in August and received a follow-up appointment for a month later. When she returned for her follow-up appointment, she was readmitted to the hospital. She received a number of tests including an echo and an electrocardiogram. Once the doctor reviewed her test results, she was told that the sutures from her surgery were loose and that she would need to receive surgery to replace her mitral valve.

Since her first surgery, Soe no longer has a cough. However, she is pale. Her mother is worried because Soe has not gained weight nor has her condition gradually improved like other heart patients after surgery.

“After she recovers, I want to send her to school until she becomes a teacher,” said Soe’s mother. “When she plays with her friends, she pretends she is a teacher and that she is teaching her friends. Even when she felt sick, she would try to go to school and she always studied a lot. Her teacher loves her. But Soe is always worried that she will fail her exams.”

Soe is a 13-year-old from Burma. She lives with her parents and two siblings in a village in Taninthary Division. Her brother goes to school...

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Soe's Timeline

  • October 1, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Soe was submitted by Bridgitte Agocs at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • October 2, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Soe received treatment at Lampang Hospital in Thailand. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • October 2, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Soe's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • December 23, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Soe's treatment was fully funded.

  • January 15, 2021
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Soe's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 36 donors

Treatment
MV, AV Repair and Valves Replace
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $20,349 for Soe's treatment
Subsidies fund $18,849 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$6,171
Medical Staff
$2,559
Medication
$284
Supplies
$8,334
Travel
$1,091
Labs
$76
Radiology
$1,300
Other
$534
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients may experience excessive sweating, extreme tiredness and fatigue, irregular heartbeat, rapid breathing or shortness of breath, chest pain, lightheadedness, or loss of consciousness.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients cannot do labor work—even doing household chores may tire them. Adults will be unable to care for their families, and children will be unable to play or attend school. As the condition progresses, patients may become unable to eat.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Patients cannot afford to go to the hospital. Many people rely on medications provided by dealers who are not authorized pharmacists.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Damaged valves are repaired and replaced during open heart surgery.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This surgery saves lives. Children will return to school, and adults will return to working and caring for their families.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Potential side effects include bleeding, infection, fever, swelling, inflammation, arrhythmias, damage to surrounding organs, stroke, and death. Heart surgery is more likely to be life-threatening for patients who are very sick before the surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many of our medical partner's patients live in remote areas. They cannot afford or access treatment because it is only available in large cities.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If left untreated, this heart condition will become life-threatening for patients.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.