Meet another patient

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Jane from Kenya raised $740 for breast cancer treatment.

Jane
100%
  • $740 raised, $0 to go
$740
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Jane's treatment was fully funded on May 24, 2016.
July 2, 2016

Jane received successful breast cancer treatment, but did not require funding.

Jane underwent successful wide local excision surgery on her left breast, and is recovering well. However, Jane’s husband was able to cover the cost of her care through his medical insurance. Therefore, she did not require Watsi funding.

Thank you for supporting Jane and her family.

Jane underwent successful wide local excision surgery on her left breast, and is recovering well. However, Jane's husband was able to cover ...

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May 6, 2016

Jane felt a lump on her left breast two months ago and had a mammogram test done. She had a breast lumpectomy, but she still experiences slight pain and is not able to engage in hard labor or tend to her farm due to the pain. The lump was confirmed as cancer.

Jane is a middle aged woman, a wife and a mother of three children. Her husband works as a government chief while she is a farmer. Jane’s husband no longer can support the family, which has greatly affected their socioeconomic lifestyle. Jane is the only provider for her family, and her condition is getting in the way or supporting her children.

If not treated, Jane is at risk of having cancer spread to other parts of her body and this might result into premature death. Surgeons now recommend a wide local excision on her left breast. Unfortunately, Jane is not able to get the full amount needed to meet the $740 treatment cost on her own.

Once Jane is able to receive the treatment she needs, the potentially fatal risk of cancer spreading to other parts of her body will be reduced. She will be free to farm and take care of herself and family.

“I pray to get well soon and be able to continue supporting my children,” Jane said.

Jane felt a lump on her left breast two months ago and had a mammogram test done. She had a breast lumpectomy, but she still experiences sli...

Read more

Jane's Timeline

  • May 6, 2016
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Jane was submitted by Beatrice Njoroge, Curative Medical Support Program Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • May 9, 2016
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Jane was scheduled to receive treatment at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • May 17, 2016
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Jane's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • July 2, 2016
    FUNDING ENDED

    Jane is no longer raising funds.

  • July 2, 2016
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Jane's treatment did not happen. Read the update.

Funded by 13 donors

Funded by 13 donors

Treatment
Mastectomy
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A mastectomy is a surgery to remove the breast or part of the breast and is usually performed to treat breast cancer. Common symptoms of breast cancer include a lump or swelling in all or part of the breast, skin irritation or dimpling, pain, discharge, redness, and thickening of the skin.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If breast cancer is not treated, the cancer may spread to other organs, potentially leading to early death. Untreated breast cancer can also lead to pain and infection within the breast.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Breast cancer is the leading cancer in women in Kenya (34 per 100,000). It has been identified as the number one killer of women aged 35-55 years. Late diagnosis is the main reason for high mortality.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient reports to the hospital, and lab work is done. The following day, the patient goes into the operating room for surgery. The patient stays in the hospital ward for three to seven days. The surgery is considered a success if the wound heals cleanly. The patient is then discharged from the hospital.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This treatment is curative if the cancer has not spread widely. Usually, this surgery is not performed if the cancer has already spread. Sometimes, doctors are unable to determine if the cancer has spread until they perform post-operative lymph node testing.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

There are very few side effects or risks if the condition is diagnosed and treated before the cancer has spread widely.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

In Africa, there is limited capacity to treat breast cancer. Many cancers are diagnosed in advanced stages due to the limited number of diagnostic and treatment centers.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

For early-stage breast cancer, a “lumpectomy” surgery may be adequate. Additional radiation therapy will be required for cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes.

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Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Gatguon

Gatguon is an 8-week-old baby girl from a remote area of South Sudan. The civil war in South Sudan has made it difficult for many to access healthcare and treatment, including Gatguon's family. Gatguon was born with swelling in the back of her head. Upon referral to Old Fangak Clinic, the doctor diagnosed Gatguon with spina bifida, a type of neural tube defect in which the spine does not properly close around the spinal cord. Without treatment, Gatguon is at risk of lower-limb paralysis, infection of the exposed nervous tissue, development of tethered cord syndrome, and possible developmental delays. Gatguon urgently needs spina bifida repair surgery to correct the condition and reduce risk of infection. Unfortunately, this treatment is not available for her in South Sudan. Dr Jill Seaman and her team at Old Fangak Clinic facilitated Gatguon’s travel to Kenya – a long and difficult journey for a sick baby. Now, doctors at our medical partner's care center in Kenya will perform the surgery she needs. Gatguon’s parents have two kids. Her mother is a stay-at-home mom and her father is a vegetable farmer. They are hopeful that baby Gatguon will be treated and that they will continue taking care of her and loving her unconditionally. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping Gatguon's family raise $1,151 to cover the cost of spina bifida closure surgery. The procedure is scheduled to take place on April 20th and will hopefully spare Gatguon of further complications and allow her to grow and develop along a healthy trajectory. Gatguon’s mother shared, “We hope that our child will be treated.”

57% funded

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