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Success! Ronald from Kenya raised $615 to treat hydrocephalus.

Ronald
100%
  • $615 raised, $0 to go
$615
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Ronald's treatment was fully funded on September 16, 2016.

Photo of Ronald post-operation

October 13, 2016

Ronald received successful brain surgery.

Ronald had surgery to drain the excess fluid in his brain due to a condition called hydrocephalus. It was exhilarating for his parents to have him treated. Ronald is less irritable and a happier child now. He will be able to enjoy a healthy life.

“I just wanted to thank you for your inconceivable compassion,” Ronald’s mother shared. “My son’s condition has been traumatic, but being able to care for him without worrying about the hospital bill certainly lightened our load. I won’t overlook your generosity sincerely.”

Ronald had surgery to drain the excess fluid in his brain due to a condition called hydrocephalus. It was exhilarating for his parents to ha...

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August 1, 2016

Meet Ronald, a baby boy from Kenya. At three months old, Ronald’s head began increasing in size and he cried very often. Having never raised another child, his parents were not aware that something was wrong.

During a normal pediatric clinic, the doctor noted that Ronald’s head was abnormally big. After a scan, it was confirmed that five-month-old Ronald had a condition known as hydrocephalus. If not treated Ronald may suffer delayed milestones and brain damage. An endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) was recommended to treat the hydrocephalus, but the funds were not available to pay for it.

Ronald’s father is the sole provider for the family and works hard doing casual labor at construction sites not far from home. His mother stays home and takes care of him, soothing and caring for him when he cries and is uncomfortable.

For $615, Ronald will receive ETV treatment at BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital in Kenya. His parents hope that little Ronald will be able to receive treatment, despite their lack of funds, and get well as soon as he can.

“Our lives have changed because we cannot do any of the things we used to do,” shares Ronald’s mother. “Ronald requires utmost attention and therefore I can’t even commit to work. I hope he gets well and our lives get back to normal.”

Meet Ronald, a baby boy from Kenya. At three months old, Ronald’s head began increasing in size and he cried very often. Having never raised...

Read more

Ronald's Timeline

  • August 1, 2016
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Ronald was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare.

  • August 2, 2016
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Ronald received treatment at BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital (BKKH) in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • September 6, 2016
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Ronald's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • September 16, 2016
    FULLY FUNDED

    Ronald's treatment was fully funded.

  • October 13, 2016
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Ronald's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 6 donors

Funded by 6 donors

Treatment
Hydrocephalus - Shunt
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Symptoms of hydrocephalus include an enlarged head size, irritability, abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain, and increased intracranial pressure. Cognitive development can be affected, and damage to the optic nerve can cause blindness.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

In young children, hydrocephalus affects brain development, cognition, and vision. In older children and adults, hydrocephalus also causes headaches.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

The burden of infant hydrocephalus in East Africa is significant, with more than 6,000 new cases estimated per year. The majority are caused by neonatal infection and vitamin deficiency, and should thus be preventable. In East Africa, the single most common cause of hydrocephalus is infection, usually via neonatal meningitis or ventriculitis. Neonatal sepsis is common and is exacerbated by the lack of skilled perinatal care for the majority of births in Africa.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Hydrocephalus patients are usually treated within a few days of arriving at the hospital. Fortunately, our medical partner can accept many patients who would otherwise go home if they could not afford the surgery cost. Treatment involves inserting a shunt into the brain to route cerebrospinal fluid to another part of the body. One month after surgery, the patient returns for a follow-up appointment.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This surgery is lifesaving. The patient will no longer be at risk of cognitive and vision damage. Surgical treatment for hydrocephalus can restore and maintain normal cerebrospinal fluid levels in the brain.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This condition is treatable, though the outcome depends on how quickly the disease is identified and treated.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality care centers in the region. Hospitals lack adequate resources and expertise to treat this condition. With about one neurosurgeon per 10,000,000 people in East Africa, initial treatment for hydrocephalus is often unavailable.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Surgery is the only option.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Queen

Queen is a six-year-old girl and the first born child in a family of two children. She and her younger brother are cared for by their grandparents as their mother sadly passed away in 2018 and their father is absent. Queen has been happily helping her grandmother with little home chores like washing dishes, sweeping the compound, and sometimes cooking. Both grandparents depend entirely on small scale farming of maize, vegetables, and bananas. As her name suggests, Queen is a nice and charming student who was to join first-grade early this year but unfortunately during the December holidays last year, she was involved in a painful fire accident. One day, Queen was helping her grandmother prepare porridge on a three stone fire place. Unknowingly, her dress caught on fire and badly injured her legs. Her wound healed, but burn scar contractures developed because of the tightened the skin around her legs. As a result, this has limited her ability to stand, walk, and enjoy her daily activities with her grandmother. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Queen receive treatment to relieve her pain. On August 5th, surgeons at their care center will perform a burn contracture release surgery to help her walk again. Now, she needs help to fund this $874 procedure. Queen’s uncle says: “She used to be the one helping her grandmother who has already aged up but with her condition right now her grandmother has to help her do everything. Please help my niece.”

89% funded

89%funded
$778raised
$96to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Queen

Queen is a six-year-old girl and the first born child in a family of two children. She and her younger brother are cared for by their grandparents as their mother sadly passed away in 2018 and their father is absent. Queen has been happily helping her grandmother with little home chores like washing dishes, sweeping the compound, and sometimes cooking. Both grandparents depend entirely on small scale farming of maize, vegetables, and bananas. As her name suggests, Queen is a nice and charming student who was to join first-grade early this year but unfortunately during the December holidays last year, she was involved in a painful fire accident. One day, Queen was helping her grandmother prepare porridge on a three stone fire place. Unknowingly, her dress caught on fire and badly injured her legs. Her wound healed, but burn scar contractures developed because of the tightened the skin around her legs. As a result, this has limited her ability to stand, walk, and enjoy her daily activities with her grandmother. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Queen receive treatment to relieve her pain. On August 5th, surgeons at their care center will perform a burn contracture release surgery to help her walk again. Now, she needs help to fund this $874 procedure. Queen’s uncle says: “She used to be the one helping her grandmother who has already aged up but with her condition right now her grandmother has to help her do everything. Please help my niece.”

89% funded

89%funded
$778raised
$96to go