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Success! Veha from Cambodia raised $231 to fund removal of a mass in his nose.

Veha
100%
  • $231 raised, $0 to go
$231
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Veha's treatment was fully funded on September 16, 2020.

Photo of Veha post-operation

June 18, 2020

Veha underwent surgery to remove a mass from his nose.

Veha’s surgery was successful! His doctors removed a mass from his left nostril that was causing him pain. He can now breathe well, no longer bleeds from his nose, and his doctors report that there is no sign of infection. Veha can now go on to live a happy and healthy life.

“I am pleased to see my son being active again. He is playing with his friends and not crying from the pain anymore,” Veha’s father shared.

Veha's surgery was successful! His doctors removed a mass from his left nostril that was causing him pain. He can now breathe well, no longe...

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April 20, 2020

Veha is a 3-year-old boy from Cambodia and the only child in his family. His mother is a construction worker and his father is a tuk tuk driver. Veha enjoys reading cartoon books, playing games, and watching TV.

One month ago, he developed a mass in his left nostril, and over time it has become increasingly painful and produces a foul odor. In addition to the bad smell, he experiences nasal obstruction. His family traveled three hours to bring him to the hospital for care.

Veha traveled to our medical partner’s care center to receive treatment. On April 20th, surgeons at our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre (CSC), will remove the mass. Now, Veha needs help to raise $231 to fund this procedure.

“I hope that doctor will perform the surgery successfully so my son’s nose will not cause him pain anymore,” Veha’s father said.

Veha is a 3-year-old boy from Cambodia and the only child in his family. His mother is a construction worker and his father is a tuk tuk dri...

Read more

Veha's Timeline

  • April 20, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Veha was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre, our medical partner in Cambodia.

  • April 20, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Veha received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • April 20, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Veha's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • June 18, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Veha's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • September 16, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Veha's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 5 donors

Profile 48x48 20180704 133135
Profile 48x48 avatar 20180826 134646
Profile 48x48 aaeaaqaaaaaaaabnaaaajdyzndi5zgeylty4yjutndblos1iowzklte5mzbhyty4nduznq

Funded by 5 donors

Profile 48x48 20180704 133135
Profile 48x48 avatar 20180826 134646
Profile 48x48 aaeaaqaaaaaaaabnaaaajdyzndi5zgeylty4yjutndblos1iowzklte5mzbhyty4nduznq
Treatment
Remove FB / Cyst / Lesion / Mass
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $231 for Veha's treatment
Hospital Fees
$34
Medical Staff
$99
Medication
$0
Supplies
$40
Labs
$3
Radiology
$55
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients will present with a growing mass. Depending on its location, the mass may cause pain and difficulty breathing or swallowing. Foreign bodies include shrapnel and other objects that do not belong in the human body. Masses, cysts, and tumors are abnormal tissue growths.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Disturbances from foreign bodies/masses/cysts/tumors can be cosmetic, limit function, cause pain, and damage internal organs.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Foreign bodies, such as shrapnel from landmines, are more common in Cambodia than the United States, especially in rural areas. It is estimated that there may be as many as four to six million mines and other pieces of unexploded ordnance in Cambodia.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

If the foreign body/mass/cyst/tumor is superficial, the removal procedure can be done under local anesthesia. Removal of deeper objects or large tumors requires general anesthesia.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This treatment improves a patient's appearance and function, reduces pain, and limits risk of damage to other body parts.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Risks are minor but depend on the site, size, and aggressiveness of the foreign body/mass/cyst/tumor.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Simple removal procedures can be done at local district or provincial hospitals, but patients must pay. Patients come to CSC because they cannot afford the procedure at their local hospital.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

For most masses, there are no alternatives. For aggressive tumors, patients may undergo chemotherapy or radiotherapy to reduce the tumor.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Khin

Khin is a 25-year-old man from Thailand. He lives with his wife and his friend in Mae Pa Village in the north of the country. Khin and his wife moved from Burma searching for better job opportunities. His wife works in a factory as a seamstress. Khin used to work as a day laborer but since his accident he has not been able to work. His friend works as an agricultural day laborer but he does not share his income with Khin and his wife. In his free time, Khin loved to play caneball with his friends and listen to music. Khin currently has a colostomy and shared that he does not like having one. He feels embarrassed and he avoids his friends. He worries what his friends will think so he always stays at home since he received the colostomy. Aside from his symptoms, he feels sad that he cannot work and that he has to depend on his wife’s income. Furthermore, because of the COVID-19, the factory his wife works at has reduced their hours of operation. Khin underwent a colostomy, in which the end of the colon was brought through an opening in the abdominal wall. This surgery is often performed to bypass bowel malformations, but colostomies are usually temporary and may call for reversal. In Khin's case, his colostomy requires reversal in order to restore bowel function and prevent future complications. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to cover the cost of a reverse colostomy for Khin. The surgery is scheduled to take place on August 10th and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably and confidently. Khin said, “I feel sad that I cannot work and have to depend on my wife’s income. When I was admitted at the hospital my wife had to accompany me which also reduced the salary she received.”

79% funded

79%funded
$1,198raised
$302to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.