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Success! Daniel from Kenya raised $528 to fund hernia repair surgery.

Daniel
100%
  • $528 raised, $0 to go
$528
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Daniel's treatment was fully funded on January 1, 2017.

Photo of Daniel post-operation

February 1, 2017

Daniel underwent successful hernia repair surgery.

He is no longer at risk of a strangulated hernia. He will return to his life pain-free.

“Your generosity brings a message of hope with it and the knowledge that there are very caring people. Thank you so much,” says Daniel’s mother.

He is no longer at risk of a strangulated hernia. He will return to his life pain-free. “Your generosity brings a message of hope with it...

Read more
December 4, 2016

Daniel is a four-year-old boy from Kenya. He has been diagnosed with an inguinal hernia. When he visited our medical partner, he had a visible swelling on his lower abdomen. His condition, which developed in October, made him feel shy around other children.

On December 5, Daniel underwent surgery to repair the hernia. This surgery reduced his risk of a strangulated hernia.

Daniel is the youngest child in his family. He was adopted by his parents at a young age. His parents are farmers who grow food and keep livestock. They live in a wooden house. They cannot afford Daniel’s care, so our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $528 in funding.

“I want my boy to be well and start schooling like a normal child,” says Daniel’s mother. Fortunately, he is scheduled to start school in January.

Daniel is a four-year-old boy from Kenya. He has been diagnosed with an inguinal hernia. When he visited our medical partner, he had a visib...

Read more

Daniel's Timeline

  • December 4, 2016
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Daniel was submitted by Robert Kariuki, Process Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • December 5, 2016
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Daniel received treatment at BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital (BKKH) in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • December 19, 2016
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Daniel's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • January 1, 2017
    FULLY FUNDED

    Daniel's treatment was fully funded.

  • February 1, 2017
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Daniel's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 2 donors

Profile 48x48 highres untitled shoot 013

Funded by 2 donors

Profile 48x48 highres untitled shoot 013
Treatment
Hernia / Hydrocele Bilateral
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $528 for Daniel's treatment
Hospital Fees
$522
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$2
Supplies
$0
Labs
$4
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A hernia occurs when a portion of the intestine protrudes through the lower abdominal wall, usually for one of two reasons. The first is a congenital abnormality in which the tissues did not close. The second is excessive stress in an adult, often due to heavy physical labor or pregnancy. Patients experience a bulge or lump in the affected area. The hernia may cause the patient to feel pain, discomfort, weakness, pressure, and sensations of heaviness or aching. These symptoms are often exacerbated when the patient coughs, bends over, or lifts heavy objects. In some cases, hernias have no symptoms and are only detected during routine medical exams.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients with uncomplicated hernias may experience only annoyance or discomfort. As the hernia opening expands, the discomfort will increase. Small openings are more likely to trap the intestine, potentially leading to intestinal damage or death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Hernias are common in Africa. People often do very hard physical labor and lift heavy objects. Women tend to have more children than those in the United States. It is possible that some hernias have infectious or genetic causes.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Surgery lasts for three to eight hours, depending on the age of the patient and the severity of the hernia. The patient will stay in the hospital anywhere from two days to eight weeks, again depending on the age of the patient and the severity of the hernia. The patient is continually monitored.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Treatment is curative. The chance of intestinal strangulation or bowel obstruction reduces significantly.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Hernia repair is not a risky procedure, and it comes with few side effects.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many patients will ignore a hernia until it becomes uncomfortable and seek care at that time. Some people will wear tighter pants or a tight band around the waist to prevent the intestine from protruding.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

If the hernia is not “stuck,” patients tend to ignore it and adapt to living with it. However, this could lead to future complications.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Paw

Paw is a 24-year-old woman from Thailand. Originally from Burma, Paw, her husband, their three daughters and her parents fled in March 2021 after the Burmese military shot rockets into their village. In Thailand, as refugees, they cannot work, and have temporarily moved in with Paw's brother and his family. They receive rice from her brother's neighbors, while her brother's family provides them with vegetables and curries. In July 2021, Paw's parents and her two older daughters went back to their village when they felt it was safe to do so. Meanwhile, her husband and her three-month-old baby have stayed with her while she receives treatment in Chiang Mai. Two years ago, Paw noticed a mass on the right side of her neck. Her neighbor suggested she apply a natural remedy, but unfortunately, the mass remained and grew over time. In September 2019, she visited a local hospital in Thailand with her husband, but the surgery recommended was too expensive. She experiences pain near the site of the mass, and the mass is still growing. Paw sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF). She is scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery on August 16th, and now she needs to raise $1,500 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Paw shared, “I felt embarrassed and very upset when I first noticed that I had this problem. I will feel a lot better after my surgery because I have needed to receive it since I first went to see the doctor in 2019. In the future I want to look after my children and send them to school.”

86% funded

86%funded
$1,290raised
$210to go
Fred

Fred is a motorbike delivery man from Kenya. He is the last born in a family of five. Fred recently got a job in Nairobi making deliveries using a motorbike. He has only been working for two months at his job. On average, he can make $4 a day. The single young man lives in an apartment costing $30 a month. He does not have active medical insurance coverage do to the cost. His parents are small-scale farmers who grow food crops for home-use on their half an acre piece of land in Kisii. Fred's parents rely on him for upkeep and income since not all his siblings have jobs. To save money, he had travelled to his ancestral home in Kisii (about 500 km from Nairobi) to visit his elderly parents using his work motorbike. He was involved in an accident along Maai Maihiu road while going back to Nairobi. A personal car was on the wrong side of the narrow road and unfortunately hit him. He was rushed to Kijabe Hospital as an emergency case and admitted right away. X-rays revealed that he has a midshaft fracture femur, distal fibular fracture, ulna styloid fracture, Scaphoid fracture, and fracture of his finger.. The Orthopedic team has recommended right femur and right distal tibia fracture repair surgery. He is currently unable to walk or use his right leg and arm. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On August 25th, Fred will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. He will be able to walk again and use his arm again Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. Fred says, “I am young and have a life to lead, I cannot lose my leg. I recently started working with high hopes for my future and supporting my elderly parents. I also promised my brother to pay for his college fees. Sadly, I now cannot walk or use my legs”.

86% funded

86%funded
$1,302raised
$198to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.