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Success! Bwe Paw from Burma raised $1,500 for surgery to remove a tumor from her abdomen.

Bwe Paw
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Bwe Paw's treatment was fully funded on October 5, 2016.

Photo of Bwe Paw post-operation

October 25, 2016

Bwe Paw successfully received surgery to remove a tumor from her abdomen.

When sitting with BCMF staff during the intake interview, Bwe Paw’s mother said she thought that her daughter’s condition was incurable.

Following surgery, Bwe Paw is now walking without assistance, eating well, and has no more difficulty breathing. Furthermore, she says she is less lethargic and no longer dizzy, and doesn’t have to lie down as she did before. In the near future, Bwe Paw would like to return to school to work as a nurse in Burma. She says that she wants to help others who are sick just as she was helped.

When asked about what she wanted to express to the donors, Bwe Paw said, “May their families be blessed and their work be prosperous. In the future, I want to be like them, one who can help others.”

When sitting with BCMF staff during the intake interview, Bwe Paw’s mother said she thought that her daughter’s condition was incurable. ...

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August 14, 2016

“I want to resume my schooling,” shares Bwe Paw. “My dream is to become a medic or a schoolteacher.”

Bwe Paw is an 18-year-old girl from Burma. When she isn’t dreaming about her future career, Bwe Paw enjoys watching movies with her friends and playing volleyball. Lately, though, health concerns have made it hard for Bwe Paw to relax.

In 2013, she started feeling pain in her stomach. Although Bwe Paw took medications from a local pharmacy, the pain only worsened, and she was soon experiencing dizziness, blurred vision, and fatigue as well. After making several long journeys to multiple clinics, Bwe Paw was eventually diagnosed with a benign tumor in her abdomen.

Bwe Paw’s doctors say that she needs to have her tumor surgically removed in order to relieve these symptoms. Meanwhile, her condition’s impact on her life continues to worsen: she is losing weight due to eating and sleeping disturbances, and has had to drop out of school despite her high academic aspirations.

Bwe Paw’s family cannot afford to pay for her surgery. The money they make as farmers is barely enough to sustain the daily needs of Bwe Paw and her three siblings. But with our help, she can receive the tumor removal surgery she needs. $1,500 will pay for her operation, as well as her lab tests and recovery time at Mae Sot General Hospital.

Without the setbacks of pain and fatigue, Bwe Paw will be back on track to pursue her high hopes of working in medicine or education.

“I want to resume my schooling,” shares Bwe Paw. “My dream is to become a medic or a schoolteacher.” Bwe Paw is an 18-year-old girl from...

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Bwe Paw's Timeline

  • August 14, 2016
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Bwe Paw was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • August 16, 2016
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Bwe Paw received treatment at Mae Sot General Hospital in Thailand. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • September 9, 2016
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Bwe Paw's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • October 5, 2016
    FULLY FUNDED

    Bwe Paw's treatment was fully funded.

  • October 25, 2016
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Bwe Paw's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 12 donors

Funded by 12 donors

Treatment
Removal of Benign Tumor
  • Cost Breakdown
On average, it costs $5,177 for Bwe Paw's treatment
Subsidies fund $3,677 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$3,311
Medical Staff
$675
Medication
$7
Supplies
$400
Labs
$86
Radiology
$567
Other
$131

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Myo

Myo Htay is a 22-year-old who lives with his parents and younger brother in the border region of Burma. His parents work as day laborers at a gold mine, carrying dirt and debris. Myo used to work with his parents but stopped last November when his health deteriorated. Because the gold mine closes during the rainy season, his parents only have work for six months out of the year. The rest of the time they try to live off of their savings. Around six months ago, Myo started to feel tired when he worked. At first he thought he was tired from working too hard. When he continued to feel tired for over a month, he thought that he needed to see a doctor. However, because of their limited funds, he did not want his parents to spend what they had on a trip to a clinic or a hospital. Around the middle of April, his condition worsened. He had difficulty breathing, experienced chest pain, and also heart palpitations. His parents brought him to a nearby hospital where he was diagnosed with a heart disease. The doctor told them to bring him to Yangon for further treatment. After Myo's parents borrowed money, they went to Yangon and took him to two different hospitals. At the last hospital, Myo was admitted for five days as he was unwell at that time. He received a follow-up appointment for two weeks later, but was brought back on April 30th when he developed rapid breathing, heart palpitations, chest pain and oedema (swelling) in both his legs. Myo was readmitted to the hospital, and the doctor told Myo's parents that his surgery would cost 20,000,000 kyat (approx. $11,000 USD). When they told the doctor that they cannot afford to pay for his surgery, a nurse gave them the phone number of an abbot in Yangon. After they called the abbot and told him what the doctor had said, the abbot referred Myo to our medical parter Burma Children Medical Fund for the assistance accessing the cardiac treatment he needs. Currently, Myo is on oxygen. If he does not receive oxygen, he has difficulty breathing as well as heart palpitations. He cannot walk for more than three minutes and if he does, he feels extremely tired. His whole family is worried about his condition. Fortunately, Myo's surgery has been scheduled for May 8th. He will have both valves of his heart replaced. His family needs $1,500 to help with the total cost of his surgery and care. Myo’s mother said, “I would give up everything to save my son’s life. I would sleep on the ground if we had no home to live in. I only wish to see my son getting better.”

60% funded

60%funded
$905raised
$595to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Myo

Myo Htay is a 22-year-old who lives with his parents and younger brother in the border region of Burma. His parents work as day laborers at a gold mine, carrying dirt and debris. Myo used to work with his parents but stopped last November when his health deteriorated. Because the gold mine closes during the rainy season, his parents only have work for six months out of the year. The rest of the time they try to live off of their savings. Around six months ago, Myo started to feel tired when he worked. At first he thought he was tired from working too hard. When he continued to feel tired for over a month, he thought that he needed to see a doctor. However, because of their limited funds, he did not want his parents to spend what they had on a trip to a clinic or a hospital. Around the middle of April, his condition worsened. He had difficulty breathing, experienced chest pain, and also heart palpitations. His parents brought him to a nearby hospital where he was diagnosed with a heart disease. The doctor told them to bring him to Yangon for further treatment. After Myo's parents borrowed money, they went to Yangon and took him to two different hospitals. At the last hospital, Myo was admitted for five days as he was unwell at that time. He received a follow-up appointment for two weeks later, but was brought back on April 30th when he developed rapid breathing, heart palpitations, chest pain and oedema (swelling) in both his legs. Myo was readmitted to the hospital, and the doctor told Myo's parents that his surgery would cost 20,000,000 kyat (approx. $11,000 USD). When they told the doctor that they cannot afford to pay for his surgery, a nurse gave them the phone number of an abbot in Yangon. After they called the abbot and told him what the doctor had said, the abbot referred Myo to our medical parter Burma Children Medical Fund for the assistance accessing the cardiac treatment he needs. Currently, Myo is on oxygen. If he does not receive oxygen, he has difficulty breathing as well as heart palpitations. He cannot walk for more than three minutes and if he does, he feels extremely tired. His whole family is worried about his condition. Fortunately, Myo's surgery has been scheduled for May 8th. He will have both valves of his heart replaced. His family needs $1,500 to help with the total cost of his surgery and care. Myo’s mother said, “I would give up everything to save my son’s life. I would sleep on the ground if we had no home to live in. I only wish to see my son getting better.”

60% funded

60%funded
$905raised
$595to go