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Success! Eliphas from Kenya raised $1,130 to fund a surgery to repair his fractured femur.

Eliphas
100%
  • $1,130 raised, $0 to go
$1,130
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Eliphas's treatment was fully funded on December 2, 2020.

Photo of Eliphas post-operation

July 23, 2020

Eliphas underwent a surgery to repair his fractured femur.

The surgery was successful and Eliphas was discharged and advised to come to the surgical clinic for a follow-up. The surgery will restore his limb function and improve his quality of life.

Eliphas mother shared, “I’m so thankful for the treatment my son has received. I’m happy because he will be able to resume school when they reopen once the COVID-19 crisis improves.”

The surgery was successful and Eliphas was discharged and advised to come to the surgical clinic for a follow-up. The surgery will restore h...

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June 30, 2020

Eliphas is the fifth born in a family of seven children. He is in the third grade but has had to repeat grade levels due to the financial instability of the family. His older three siblings already had to drop out of school because they could not pay the fees and lacked food. Eliphas’ father died in 2013, so his mother is a widow and has difficulty making ends meet. His mother works as a casual laborer, washing clothes in the neighborhood and sometimes farming for other people. She and her children live in a mud house on a small piece of land.

Eliphas fell and sustained a left femur fracture. If Eliphas does not get the required treatment, he may develop an infection or lose the function of his leg. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is asking for your help to fund the cost of his treatment. Eliphas and his family need $1,130 to fund this mobility-restoring surgery.

Eliphas’ mother shared, “If my son gets help, I shall be very happy and appreciative.”

Eliphas is the fifth born in a family of seven children. He is in the third grade but has had to repeat grade levels due to the financial in...

Read more

Eliphas's Timeline

  • June 30, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Eliphas was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare.

  • July 1, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Eliphas's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • July 2, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Eliphas received treatment at Maua Methodist Hospital in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • July 23, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Eliphas's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • December 2, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Eliphas's treatment was fully funded.

Treatment
ORIF (IM Nailing)
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $1,130 for Eliphas's treatment
Hospital Fees
$298
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$186
Supplies
$646
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The common symptoms include: extreme pain; inability/difficulty in using limbs; deformity of a limb. This procedure corrects a severe, poorly aligned fracture where the ends of affected bones are far apart. Such a fracture may occur anywhere in the body (leg, hip, arm, jaw, etc.), usually as a result of trauma.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

A non-union leads to chronic disability, pain, and inability to work.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Car/motorcycle/taxi accidents are the number one cause of this type of condition. Work-related accidents and violence are others. Yes, it is more common largely because African roads are among some of the most dangerous in the world.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Please refer to the AMH treatment process document.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Curative. An ORIF fixes the broken bone restoring it to complete function and thus, enabling the patient to be able to work and have a productive and high-quality life.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Medium surgical risk but most trauma patients are young and tolerate the procedure well. Overall, the risk of surgery is less than the risks of the alternative (traction), or doing nothing. There is a risk of the metal becoming infected, which would require antibiotics and perhaps removal of the hardware and a second surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality orthopedic centers in developing countries. In the developed world, any patient would go to their local hospital and get this procedure. Often patients have received initial care for a fracture at another hospital and may have been placed in “traction.” “Traction” involves placing the affected limb in a cast under tension for prolonged periods to try to re-align the bones. Those who have funds try to make their way to a regional/referral hospital or hospital that is well known for higher-quality care. Most patients seen in Watsi Medical Partner's Care Centers who are in need of an ORIF are mainly patients who have been not been helped in other hospitals. Usually, those hospitals lack adequate resources and expertise to treat them.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Traction is an alternative for some—but not all—cases. And traction requires a patient to be in the hospital, immobile, for months—leading not only to lost wages but risk of bedsores, blood clots, and hospital-acquired infections.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

William

William is a small-scale farmer from Kenya. He is a married man with twelve children. Some of his oldest children are married while others are still in school. William and his family live in a semi-permanent house. He has been a long-term potato farmer who has been growing them mainly for sale. His family has worked on their farm and it has contributed a lot to their income. Through the limited income William makes, he has been able to provide for his children's basic needs. William has medical insurance that he has been using throughout all his visits for inpatient and outpatient services for his medical procedures. In May 2019, when William was walking along the road, he was hit by a motorbike and he fell down, thus injuring his lower limb. Immediately, he was taken to a facility where he was admitted and surgery was done.  All was well up to last year when he started feeling unwell and decided to visit our partner's hospital. He presented with a lot of pain, he had a wound that was discharging pus, and his affected limb was swollen. An x-ray was recommended and it found that he had a non-union on his fractured bone and he had to be admitted for hardware removal, as it was already infected. He went to the operating theater for infected hardware removal and antibiotic nailing was done in order to treat his infection.  Since the nail was not stable, a patella tendon-bearing cast was applied in order to immobilize his non-united fracture. He has been in and out of the hospital for frequent check-ups, change of dressing, and casts. The wound has not improved and at some time after the antibiotic nailing, he went to the operating room for debridement and vacuum-assisted closure of the wound to help in healing and daily dressing change has been done in a health facility near his home. He also suffered eye problems in between and can barely see at the moment. On Monday when he came for review, his wound was not well and had a foul smell. His hardware needs to be removed, the non-union has to be taken down and an ORIF procedure will be done for stability. He was prepared for admission, but then it was realized that he had exhausted his inpatient insurance limit. In order to save his leg, it is vital to perform the surgery immediately. William has no alternative way of paying for his procedure, which is very complex. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On December 7th, William will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. When treated, William will be able to walk normally and he will continue with farming to provide for his family. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1145 to fund this medical care. William says, "Spending most of the time in the hospital has been quite challenging. I cannot work or supervise my work as I did before because of my fractured limb. I am really looking forward to getting better in order to stabilize my family again. Please help me."

56% funded

56%funded
$642raised
$503to go
Chit Htun

Chit Htun is a 21-year-old man from Burma who lives with his mother, two sisters and a brother. His mother is a homemaker, while Chit Htun and his siblings are students. They are supported financially by two aunties and Chit Htun's former teacher. Chit Htun was born with spina bifida as well as hydrocephalus. When Chit Htun was just over a month old, he had a shunt inserted in his brain to control hydrocephalus. In October 202, Chit Htun fell down the stairs in his home and hit his head during the fall. Since that time, he has been experiencing headaches and dizziness with occasional loss of consciousness. Chit Htun's mother brought him to a hospital in Yangon, where he received a CT scans showing that the original shunt was in place. A second shunt was inserted to help with the loss of consciousness, but the headaches and dizziness continued to be a problem. In October 2022, Chit Htun had a seizure, accompanied by nausea and vomiting. Chit Htun's mother brought him to Mae Sot Hospital, where he received a CT scan on November 28th, 2022 with the help of Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF). The doctor diagnosed Chit Htun with severe chronic hydrocephalus and suspected shunt malfunction. BCMF is now fundraising $1,500 to help cover the cost of surgery to replace Chit Htun's current shunt. Chit Htun's mother shared, "My son and I have been in Mae Sot for the past two months and we are homesick already. I hope that he will receive surgery soon and recover from his symptoms."

49% funded

49%funded
$738raised
$762to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

William

William is a small-scale farmer from Kenya. He is a married man with twelve children. Some of his oldest children are married while others are still in school. William and his family live in a semi-permanent house. He has been a long-term potato farmer who has been growing them mainly for sale. His family has worked on their farm and it has contributed a lot to their income. Through the limited income William makes, he has been able to provide for his children's basic needs. William has medical insurance that he has been using throughout all his visits for inpatient and outpatient services for his medical procedures. In May 2019, when William was walking along the road, he was hit by a motorbike and he fell down, thus injuring his lower limb. Immediately, he was taken to a facility where he was admitted and surgery was done.  All was well up to last year when he started feeling unwell and decided to visit our partner's hospital. He presented with a lot of pain, he had a wound that was discharging pus, and his affected limb was swollen. An x-ray was recommended and it found that he had a non-union on his fractured bone and he had to be admitted for hardware removal, as it was already infected. He went to the operating theater for infected hardware removal and antibiotic nailing was done in order to treat his infection.  Since the nail was not stable, a patella tendon-bearing cast was applied in order to immobilize his non-united fracture. He has been in and out of the hospital for frequent check-ups, change of dressing, and casts. The wound has not improved and at some time after the antibiotic nailing, he went to the operating room for debridement and vacuum-assisted closure of the wound to help in healing and daily dressing change has been done in a health facility near his home. He also suffered eye problems in between and can barely see at the moment. On Monday when he came for review, his wound was not well and had a foul smell. His hardware needs to be removed, the non-union has to be taken down and an ORIF procedure will be done for stability. He was prepared for admission, but then it was realized that he had exhausted his inpatient insurance limit. In order to save his leg, it is vital to perform the surgery immediately. William has no alternative way of paying for his procedure, which is very complex. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On December 7th, William will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. When treated, William will be able to walk normally and he will continue with farming to provide for his family. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1145 to fund this medical care. William says, "Spending most of the time in the hospital has been quite challenging. I cannot work or supervise my work as I did before because of my fractured limb. I am really looking forward to getting better in order to stabilize my family again. Please help me."

56% funded

56%funded
$642raised
$503to go