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Success! Mony from Cambodia raised $648 to fund retinal detachment surgery so she can see again.

Mony
100%
  • $648 raised, $0 to go
$648
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Mony's treatment was fully funded on November 13, 2021.

Photo of Mony post-operation

November 22, 2021

Mony underwent retinal detachment surgery so she can see again.

Mony had a smooth operation and was discharged home to continue healing. She likes to read books, and is excited to have time to read as she recovers. Mony is hopeful she will see more clearly and return to school to pursue her dreams.

Mony’s mother said: “I am so thankful that the doctors were able to save her eye, we want her to have a good life and be successful. We’re grateful we were in good hands. Thank you to the people who donated so that my daughter can have a normal life.”

Mony had a smooth operation and was discharged home to continue healing. She likes to read books, and is excited to have time to read as she...

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October 14, 2021

Mony is a 12-year-old student who is in 8th grade. She has three sisters and her parents work as grocery sellers. In her free time, Mony likes to read books. This has become more difficult for her because about two years ago, the retina of Mony’s right eye detached.

When Mony’s family learned about our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre, they traveled there hoping for treatment. On October 14th, eye surgeons will perform a retinal detachment repair procedure in her right eye. After recovery, she will be able to see clearly again. Now, her family needs help to fund this $648 procedure.

Mony shared, “I hope I can see well again. I want to do well in school and improve my reading and writing.”

Mony is a 12-year-old student who is in 8th grade. She has three sisters and her parents work as grocery sellers. In her free time, Mony lik...

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Mony's Timeline

  • October 14, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Mony was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • October 14, 2021
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Mony received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • October 17, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Mony's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • November 13, 2021
    FULLY FUNDED

    Mony's treatment was fully funded.

  • November 22, 2021
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Mony's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 15 donors

Funded by 15 donors

Treatment
Retinal Detachment Surgery
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $648 for Mony's treatment
Hospital Fees
$67
Medical Staff
$256
Medication
$0
Supplies
$325
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Symptoms of retinal detachment include floaters in the field of vision, flashes of light when moving the eyes or head, and a curtain over the field of vision. Floaters are specks or globs that appear from clumps of citreous gel breaking down. Other symptoms are the appearance of a curtain-like shadow over the visual field, blurred vision, and reduced peripheral vision.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Retinal detachment is a medical emergency; living with retinal detachment can cause permanent loss of vision.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Surgical eye treatment is not readily accessible in Cambodia. The longer the retina remains detached, the lower the chances are of restoring good vision.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Treatment of retinal detachment involves surgery to reattach the retina. There are three main procedures by which this is done: pneumatic retinopexy, scleral buckling surgery, and vitrectomy. In pneumatic retinopexy, air is injected into the middle of the eyeball, which pushes the detached retina to the wall of the eye. This is followed by cryopexy to repair the tear. Scleral buckling surgery involves a piece of silicone material sewn to the outer layer or the eye, relieving the tugging on the retina. In a vitrectomy, vitreous gel is removed from the eye and air, gas, or silicone gel is injected in to flatten the retina. It may take several months for vision to improve.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This surgery is critical to prevent patients with retinal detachment from going blind.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

One possible risk is that the retina cannot be reattached because of scar tissue; if this occurs, the eye will ultimately become blind. The risk of complications from this surgery is small. These complications include bleeding in the eye, increased eye pressure, swelling inside the eye, clouded lens of the eye, double vision, and infection. There is also a risk of needing further surgery if new breaks form in the retina or scar tissue develops.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Patients in need of retinal detachment may travel from across the country to receive free surgical care at CSC, as alternatives are not available and surgical eye specialists are limited.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Retinal detachment requires surgery as treatment; without surgery, vision will continually deteriorate.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Myo

Myo Htay is a 22-year-old who lives with his parents and younger brother in the border region of Burma. His parents work as day laborers at a gold mine, carrying dirt and debris. Myo used to work with his parents but stopped last November when his health deteriorated. Because the gold mine closes during the rainy season, his parents only have work for six months out of the year. The rest of the time they try to live off of their savings. Around six months ago, Myo started to feel tired when he worked. At first he thought he was tired from working too hard. When he continued to feel tired for over a month, he thought that he needed to see a doctor. However, because of their limited funds, he did not want his parents to spend what they had on a trip to a clinic or a hospital. Around the middle of April, his condition worsened. He had difficulty breathing, experienced chest pain, and also heart palpitations. His parents brought him to a nearby hospital where he was diagnosed with a heart disease. The doctor told them to bring him to Yangon for further treatment. After Myo's parents borrowed money, they went to Yangon and took him to two different hospitals. At the last hospital, Myo was admitted for five days as he was unwell at that time. He received a follow-up appointment for two weeks later, but was brought back on April 30th when he developed rapid breathing, heart palpitations, chest pain and oedema (swelling) in both his legs. Myo was readmitted to the hospital, and the doctor told Myo's parents that his surgery would cost 20,000,000 kyat (approx. $11,000 USD). When they told the doctor that they cannot afford to pay for his surgery, a nurse gave them the phone number of an abbot in Yangon. After they called the abbot and told him what the doctor had said, the abbot referred Myo to our medical parter Burma Children Medical Fund for the assistance accessing the cardiac treatment he needs. Currently, Myo is on oxygen. If he does not receive oxygen, he has difficulty breathing as well as heart palpitations. He cannot walk for more than three minutes and if he does, he feels extremely tired. His whole family is worried about his condition. Fortunately, Myo's surgery has been scheduled for May 8th. He will have both valves of his heart replaced. His family needs $1,500 to help with the total cost of his surgery and care. Myo’s mother said, “I would give up everything to save my son’s life. I would sleep on the ground if we had no home to live in. I only wish to see my son getting better.”

62% funded

62%funded
$930raised
$570to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.