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Success! Moe from Thailand raised $1,500 to fund heart surgery.

Moe
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Moe's treatment was fully funded on December 31, 2017.

Photo of Moe post-operation

February 13, 2018

Moe underwent heart surgery.

Moe feels relieved that her surgery went well. She feels much better than she did before treatment. She no longer experiences uncomfortable symptoms, and her appetite has returned.

Moe said, “Thank you very much for helping me and I can return to my work soon and can support my father again.”

Moe feels relieved that her surgery went well. She feels much better than she did before treatment. She no longer experiences uncomfortable ...

Read more
December 15, 2017

“After I receive surgery I will be able to go back to working in Bangkok to save money for my family,” shares Moe, a 32-hear-old woman.

For the past 10 years, Moe has worked in Thailand as a domestic worker. She lives in her employer’s house and works six days a week. She sends the money she earns home to Burma to support her father and younger brother’s family. For this reason, she has not been able to save up any money for medical expenses. This has been a major problem lately.

Four years ago, Moe started to feel unwell. She felt unusually fatigued and experienced occasional heart palpitations. In October of 2017, however, she had an especially frightening episode of heart palpitations and decided to visit a hospital in Bangkok.

There, she received a diagnosis of mitral stenosis, meaning that a valve in her heart is not opening properly, which inhibits blood flow. If left untreated, this condition can lead to blood clots and heart failure.

There is a surgical procedure that can correct the problem in Moe’s heart. However, she has been very anxious because she knows she cannot pay for it. She is also worried about how her family would survive without her income if she were to pass away.

But there is hope for Moe. When we raise $1,500, we will be able to sponsor her operation on January 5, as well as her lab tests, medications, and 10-day hospital stay.

“One day, it is my hope to move back to Burma to be with my family,” shares Moe. With your help, Moe will soon be healthy enough to be able to make that dream a reality.

“After I receive surgery I will be able to go back to working in Bangkok to save money for my family,” shares Moe, a 32-hear-old woman. ...

Read more

Moe's Timeline

  • December 15, 2017
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Moe was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • December 22, 2017
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Moe's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • December 31, 2017
    FULLY FUNDED

    Moe's treatment was fully funded.

  • January 9, 2018
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Moe received treatment at Lampang Hospital in Thailand. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • February 13, 2018
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Moe's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 9 donors

Funded by 9 donors

Treatment
MV, AV Repair and Valves Replace
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $20,349 for Moe's treatment
Subsidies fund $18,849 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$6,171
Medical Staff
$2,559
Medication
$284
Supplies
$8,334
Travel
$1,091
Labs
$76
Radiology
$1,300
Other
$534
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients may experience excessive sweating, extreme tiredness and fatigue, irregular heartbeat, rapid breathing or shortness of breath, chest pain, lightheadedness, or loss of consciousness.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients cannot do labor work—even doing household chores may tire them. Adults will be unable to care for their families, and children will be unable to play or attend school. As the condition progresses, patients may become unable to eat.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Patients cannot afford to go to the hospital. Many people rely on medications provided by dealers who are not authorized pharmacists.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Damaged valves are repaired and replaced during open heart surgery.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This surgery saves lives. Children will return to school, and adults will return to working and caring for their families.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Potential side effects include bleeding, infection, fever, swelling, inflammation, arrhythmias, damage to surrounding organs, stroke, and death. Heart surgery is more likely to be life-threatening for patients who are very sick before the surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many of our medical partner's patients live in remote areas. They cannot afford or access treatment because it is only available in large cities.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If left untreated, this heart condition will become life-threatening for patients.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.