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Success! Jackson from Tanzania raised $880 to fund mobility-restoring surgery helping him to walk easily.

Jackson
100%
  • $880 raised, $0 to go
$880
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Jackson's treatment was fully funded on April 8, 2022.

Photo of Jackson post-operation

April 19, 2022

Jackson underwent mobility-restoring surgery helping him to walk easily.

Jackson’s surgery went well and he had both of his legs successfully corrected. He has a full cast of both legs and is on bed rest while he heals from treatment. Through this surgery, Jackson will finally be able to walk with ease and resume his studies. He’s excited to enjoy playing sports without any challenges due to disability.

Jackson told us, “I thank God my surgery went well, and I am doing fine. I would also like to thank you for helping treat me.”

Jackson’s surgery went well and he had both of his legs successfully corrected. He has a full cast of both legs and is on bed rest while he ...

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March 22, 2022

Jackson is a fifteen-year-old student and the last-born child to his mother. He has a large family, as is common in the Maasai community where he lives. Jackson is a very hard-working boy both at home and at school. He is social and self-driven. He shared that most boys his age don’t like school or don’t get the chance to attend school, but not Jackson! His favorite subjects are Physics, Swahili, and History. He wishes to be a teacher in the future to help educate his community. Jackson is a big football fan, but he had to stop playing because his legs started hurting and it has gotten difficult for him to walk.

Jackson was diagnosed with Bilateral Genu Varus, where both of his legs are curving outwards. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, he experiences pain and difficulty walking.

Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Jackson. The procedure is scheduled to take place on March 22nd. Treatment will hopefully restore Jackson’s mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications.

Jackson says, “My legs have made walking very difficult due to the pain. I would like to walk to school without difficulty and enjoy playing sports and helping my parents.”

Jackson is a fifteen-year-old student and the last-born child to his mother. He has a large family, as is common in the Maasai community whe...

Read more

Jackson's Timeline

  • March 22, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Jackson was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare.

  • March 22, 2022
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Jackson received treatment at Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre (ALMC) in Tanzania. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • March 28, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Jackson's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • April 8, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Jackson's treatment was fully funded.

  • April 19, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Jackson's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 14 donors

Funded by 14 donors

Treatment
Fluorosis - Genu Valgus / Varus
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $880 for Jackson's treatment
Hospital Fees
$831
Medical Staff
$15
Medication
$11
Supplies
$0
Labs
$23
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients with genu valgum (or "knock-knees") have knees that bend inward and cause an abnormal walking gait. Patients with genu varum (or bowleggedness) have knees that bend outward and cause knee or hip pain and reduced range of motion in the hips.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

The patient's mobility is hindered, which can prevent the patient from making a living through physical labor. The patient may also develop arthritis later in life.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

In the United States, supplemental fluoride is added to the water to improve dental health. However, in areas of northern Tanzania, there is too much naturally-occurring fluoride in the water, which causes bone curvature.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After surgery, the patient will stay in the hospital for 4-5 days. During this time, the surgical wound will be monitored for swelling and infection. The patient will complete physiotherapy to help him or her walk or move the limbs. A series of X-rays will be performed over several months to monitor the healing process.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The bones and joints will be aligned, and long-term disability will be prevented.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This procedure is not risky, but it is time-consuming. The rehabilitation process can take several months.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Care is not easily accessible. Most patients live in remote, rural areas and are identified through mobile outreach. The pediatric surgical program at Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre was started to meet the large burden of pediatric disability in the region.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. Although some cases can heal on their own, the patients submitted to Watsi require dedicated treatment.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Dennis

Dennis is the first born in a family of four children. When he finished high school, he was reluctant to join college because of his condition. He currently is not able to work because he gets easily tired and cannot carry heavy loads. He joined college just recently but has been out of school for the past two months. Now that he is at home, he helps his mother who picks tea for a living. He does not have a health insurance coverage and cannot raise the required amount of money to cater for his hospital bill. In 2019 while he was sitting for his national school exams, Dennis experienced sharp pain in his esophagus. He took a glass of water, and the pain went away for a few weeks. The pain used to occur roughly two times in a month and a glass of water would help a lot. Late last year, the pain worsened. He was not in a position to swallow food. He went to a herbalist and was given some medication to use for some time. When the dose was over, the pain was still persistent, and he still could not swallow food normally. He was then referred to Kijabe Hospital by a friend where he was examined and given some medication to use. He didn't feel better and decided to go back to the herbalist for different medication but there was no change. Later he finally returned to Kijabe Hospital and scans and tests revealed that he has Achalasia. He is scheduled for a heller's myotomy which is a curative laparotomy surgery for his condition. Now he needs $1,074 to pay for the surgery. Dennis says, "I feel very sad. If I was healthy, I would be able to work well and be comfortable with myself.”

58% funded

58%funded
$629raised
$445to go
Josephina

Josephina is a young woman from Tanzania. She is the last-born child in a family of seven children, and lives with most of her siblings and both parents. Her parents are small-scale farmers who depend on agriculture to meet their basic needs. Though times have been hard, they are trying to manage. Josephina is hard-working and enjoys helping her mother with home chores like cooking, cleaning dishes, and washing clothes. She completed her primary school education, but unfortunately, she has not been able to continue with further studies because of financial challenges. In 2011, as she was helping her mother in the kitchen, her dress caught fire, burning her around the thighs. She was taken to the hospital where she received treatment for the open wounds. All the wounds healed, leaving her pain free for some time. She has now developed contractures and has pain and discomfort. Josephina came to our health center seeking treatment, but her parents cannot afford to pay for it. They appeal for support. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Josephina receive treatment. On October 19th, surgeons at their care center will perform a burn contracture release surgery to help her be pain free and live a comfortable life. Now, her family needs help to fund this $874 procedure. Josephina’s mother says, “My child has had to endure pain for a while because we did not know that her condition can be treated. We hope that she won’t have any pain after this.”

46% funded

46%funded
$406raised
$468to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Dennis

Dennis is the first born in a family of four children. When he finished high school, he was reluctant to join college because of his condition. He currently is not able to work because he gets easily tired and cannot carry heavy loads. He joined college just recently but has been out of school for the past two months. Now that he is at home, he helps his mother who picks tea for a living. He does not have a health insurance coverage and cannot raise the required amount of money to cater for his hospital bill. In 2019 while he was sitting for his national school exams, Dennis experienced sharp pain in his esophagus. He took a glass of water, and the pain went away for a few weeks. The pain used to occur roughly two times in a month and a glass of water would help a lot. Late last year, the pain worsened. He was not in a position to swallow food. He went to a herbalist and was given some medication to use for some time. When the dose was over, the pain was still persistent, and he still could not swallow food normally. He was then referred to Kijabe Hospital by a friend where he was examined and given some medication to use. He didn't feel better and decided to go back to the herbalist for different medication but there was no change. Later he finally returned to Kijabe Hospital and scans and tests revealed that he has Achalasia. He is scheduled for a heller's myotomy which is a curative laparotomy surgery for his condition. Now he needs $1,074 to pay for the surgery. Dennis says, "I feel very sad. If I was healthy, I would be able to work well and be comfortable with myself.”

58% funded

58%funded
$629raised
$445to go