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Success! Tariku from Ethiopia raised $1,500 for life-changing anorectal surgery.

Tariku
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Tariku's treatment was fully funded on March 19, 2016.

Photo of Tariku post-operation

August 8, 2016

Tariku received life-changing anorectal surgery.

Tariku underwent a successful posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP), followed by a colostomy closure three months later. The surgeries both went very well and Tariku can now pass stool on his own. This combination of procedures will greatly improve his life, as he is no longer at risk of colostomy related complications such as irritation, leakage, and infection. With time, he should heal completely and have no further complications from his previous malformation.

“I am so happy and thankful for the surgery done to my baby,” Tariku’s mother said. “I am sure that I will tell him about these good deeds you did for him when he grows up. Now he can be as normal as other children. God bless your vision and work.”

Tariku underwent a successful posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP), followed by a colostomy closure three months later. The surgeries b...

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February 19, 2016

Tariku is a ten-month-old little boy from Ethiopia. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF), introduces Tariku: “Tariku is very active and loves to play and laugh with his parents. He is a beautiful baby.

Unfortunately, Tariku was born with an anorectal malformation. An anorectal malformation is a congenital birth defect in which the rectum develops abnormally, making bowel movements difficult and often putting the patient at risk for spinal or heart complications as well.

Depending on the severity of the malformation, emergency colostomies are sometimes necessary to avoid a bowel obstruction. This was the case with Tariku, who received his colostomy bag at just three days old. Since then he has been unable to independently pass stool, and is likely to undergo further colostomy complications such as leakages, infections, or obstruction if his condition is not addressed.

Furthermore, Ethiopia, Tariku’s home, is located in a region whose weather patterns are significantly affected by El Niño; the country is currently experiencing its worst drought in 50 years. Tariku’s family is one of the many who are having difficulty harvesting crops during the drought. Subsequently, with already limited finances, they are unable to afford further treatment for Tariku.

“His father and I don’t have the money to cover our son’s expenses,” Tariku’s mother shares. “I hope I will see my baby’s condition treated and see him be healthy.”

Tariku needs a posterior sagittal anorectoplasty to surgically reposition his rectum and anus and allow for regular bowel movements. While Tariku recovers from the anorectoplasty, another colostomy opening will be created. Then, two to three months later a colostomy closure will be done to complete the process.

With $1,500, this will be possible for Tariku. The funds will also include his antibiotics, imaging, and inpatient stay. After his recovery, Tariku is expected to be able to independently pass stool and live a normal and healthy childhood.

Tariku is a ten-month-old little boy from Ethiopia. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF), introduces Tariku: “T...

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Tariku's Timeline

  • February 19, 2016
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Tariku was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare.

  • February 20, 2016
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Tariku received treatment at BethanyKids Myungsung Christian Medical Centre (BKMCM) in Ethiopia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • March 11, 2016
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Tariku's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • March 19, 2016
    FULLY FUNDED

    Tariku's treatment was fully funded.

  • August 8, 2016
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Tariku's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 27 donors

Funded by 27 donors

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Thidar

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$910raised
$589to go
U Tin

U Tin is a 36-year-old man, living with his mother on the western coast of Burma. U Tin’s mother is retired and helps with household chores. U Tin works in a photo studio, printing photos and wedding invitations. Through this, his monthly income is just enough to pay for their basic living expenses. One year ago, U Tin started to experience pain in his lower left abdomen. Thinking that the pain would go away, U Tin relied on traditional medicine and pain medication. In February, the pain increased, but U Tin could not afford to seek treatment at a hospital. Instead, he purchased more pain medication from a pharmacy, which helped ease his discomfort somewhat. However in April, the pain became so severe that he could no longer work. He borrowed money from his friend, and went to a hospital. The doctor examined him, and diagnosed him with an inguinal hernia. When the doctor told him the surgery would cost 1,200,000 kyat (approx. $1,200 USD), U Tin told the doctor he could not afford to pay such a sum, and he returned home still feeling unwell. A few days later, U Tin told his neighbour about his problem, and she suggested that he seek treatment at Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH), where care is more affordable. He followed his neighbour’s advice, and went to MCLH, where the doctor confirmed his diagnosis and the need for surgery. When U Tin explained that he could not afford to pay for the surgery, the doctor referred him to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, for assistance in accessing the treatment he needs. Currently, U Tin is experiencing severe pain, and he cannot sit or stand for any length of time. Fortunately, he is now scheduled for surgery on May 24th, and Burma Children Medical Fund is requesting $807 to cover the cost of U Tin's hernia repair treatment. U Tin said: “I would like to recover. I am worried that I will not be able to work and take care of my mother. When I recover, I will go continue to work [at the shop] and pay back the money I borrowed from my friends.”

50% funded

50%funded
$407raised
$400to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Thidar

Thidar is a 30-year-old woman who lives with her son, husband, parents in-law, brother-in-law, and sister-in-law in Burma. She, her husband, and her mother-in-law grow rice, beans, and sesame on their farm. During her free time, Thidar enjoys growing flowers and vegetables around her house. Ten years ago, after Thidar gave birth to her son, she began to experience troubling symptoms. These included chest pains and a rapid heartbeat. When visiting a clinic, medics determined that she has a heart condition. To help her condition and alleviate her symptoms, Thidar took medication regularly. However, she ran out of oral medication at the start of this year. This was a problem because medics at her local clinic were protesting against the February 2021 coup, so the clinic was closed. She also could not go to a different clinic because the military had many checkpoints around the nearest town at the time, and she was too scared to pass them. Months later, after experiencing exhaustion, a rapid heartbeat, painful and swollen joints, and a loss in appetite, Thidar was able to seek medical care and receive medication. Following the advice of a medic at the clinic, she eventually visited a hospital. There, she received an X-rays scan and an echocardiogram, which determined that Thidar has a heart disease requiring surgery. Due to financial constraints, she and her husband could not fund the needed procedure and had to return home with Thidar still experiencing the same troubling symptoms as before. Fortunately, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is helping Thidar finally receive treatment. On July 22nd, surgeons will perform double valve replacement cardiac surgery. This procedure will hopefully alleviate her symptoms and allow her to live more comfortably and confidently. Now, Thidar and her family need help funding this $1,500 procedure. Thidar says, “I feel very sad and I want to cry because I have no money to pay for my surgery cost. My mother and husband had to borrow money with interest [to pay for some of my medical fees]. I am also worried that I cannot work and support my son. Now, I am very happy that my surgery cost will be supported. I am thankful to all the donors and the organization.”

60% funded

60%funded
$910raised
$589to go