Meet another patient

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Malik from Tanzania raised $775 for brain surgery.

Malik
100%
  • $775 raised, $0 to go
$775
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Malik's treatment was fully funded on October 17, 2016.
April 17, 2017

Malik is recovering well.

Malik underwent successful brain surgery, treating his congenital hydrocephalus. Doctors inserted a shunt to relieve the pressure on his brain caused by the accumulation of fluid. Malik will now be able to sit up on his own. He is also at a much lower risk of cognitive and developmental delays than he was before.

Unfortunately, our medical partner was unable to take an update photo of Malik.

Malik underwent successful brain surgery, treating his congenital hydrocephalus. Doctors inserted a shunt to relieve the pressure on his bra...

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August 28, 2016

Malik was born in Tanzania on April 11, 2016. He is the first child to his parents. When Malik was born, a large part of his head was softer than usual. Malik’s mother thought with time it might become normal, but when her son turned a month old, the size of his head slowly started to increase. She took him to the hospital and she was referred to another hospital, where he was diagnosed with hydrocephalus, or an accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. Lack of money to travel for further management of hydrocephalus forced Malik’s parents to just stay at home.

They eventually heard of the Plaster House, a Watsi partner, though word of mouth. That was when they decided to bring their son for treatment. Malik’s vision is already blurred, but he feeds well. He still has no trunk control due to the size of his head. Malik needs surgery to prevent further brain damage, but his parents are unable to afford the high cost.

Malik’s mother is currently not working at all due to Malik’s condition. His father runs a small business of selling vegetables and fruits. They are all living at Malik’s parents’ house also getting some support from their parents. The little that they earn is not enough to cover the cost of surgery which Malik badly needs.

“I just wish my baby will get well and grow up like other children,” said Malik’s mother.

Malik was born in Tanzania on April 11, 2016. He is the first child to his parents. When Malik was born, a large part of his head was softer...

Read more

Malik's Timeline

  • August 28, 2016
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Malik was submitted by Esupat Kimerei, Rehab Surgery Project Assistant Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Tanzania.

  • August 29, 2016
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Malik received treatment at Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre (ALMC). Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • September 22, 2016
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Malik's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • October 17, 2016
    FULLY FUNDED

    Malik's treatment was fully funded.

  • April 17, 2017
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    We received an update on Malik. Read the update.

Funded by 4 donors

Funded by 4 donors

Treatment
Hydrocephalus alone
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Symptoms of hydrocephalus include an enlarged head size, irritability, abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain, and increased intracranial pressure. Cognitive development can be affected, and damage to the optic nerve can cause blindness.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

In young children, hydrocephalus affects brain development, cognition, and vision. In older children and adults, hydrocephalus also causes headaches.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

The burden of infant hydrocephalus in East Africa is significant, with more than 6,000 new cases estimated per year. The majority are caused by neonatal infection and vitamin deficiency, and should thus be preventable. In East Africa, the single most common cause of hydrocephalus is infection, usually via neonatal meningitis or ventriculitis. Neonatal sepsis is common and is exacerbated by the lack of skilled perinatal care for the majority of births in Africa.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Hydrocephalus patients are usually treated within a few days of arriving at the hospital. Fortunately, our medical partner can accept many patients who would otherwise go home if they could not afford the surgery cost. Treatment involves inserting a shunt into the brain to route cerebrospinal fluid to another part of the body. One month after surgery, the patient returns for a follow-up appointment.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This surgery is lifesaving. The patient will no longer be at risk of cognitive and vision damage. Surgical treatment for hydrocephalus can restore and maintain normal cerebrospinal fluid levels in the brain.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This condition is treatable, though the outcome depends on how quickly the disease is identified and treated.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality care centers in the region. Hospitals lack adequate resources and expertise to treat this condition. With about one neurosurgeon per 10,000,000 people in East Africa, initial treatment for hydrocephalus is often unavailable.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Surgery is the only option.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Victor

Victor is a student and the oldest of six in his family who live together in a grass thatched house. His parents are farmers in the village, and they grow maize and beans for their family’s upkeep. Victor was born with a complete absence of fingers on his left hand, which has forced him to learn how to do all tasks with his right hand including cooking and laundry. On March 11th, 2021, eighteen-year-old Victor was injured in a motorcycle road traffic accident. He was a passenger when the motorcycle slid on mud and fell. He sustained an injury on his lower leg, and his leg was placed in a cast shortly after the accident. A few weeks later, his condition worsened and his wounds started having signs of infection. His parents brought him to the hospital, where doctors conducted an X-ray which revealed a left tibia-fibula fracture. Victor is in pain and unable to walk. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On March 25th, Victor will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. After healing, Victor will be able to walk again and engage in his normal activities. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $1,014 to fund this procedure and his family has been able to contribute $100. Victor is a diligent student, and he scheduled his surgery to begin after he sits for his final exams. He says, “I would have wished to undergo the surgery as soon as possible but I am sitting for my exams this coming week. My prayer is that I won’t be in so much pain so that I can sit for my exams comfortably.” Victor’s mother is appealing to anyone reading his son's story to help her raise money for a successful surgery.

75% funded

75%funded
$764raised
$250to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Victor

Victor is a student and the oldest of six in his family who live together in a grass thatched house. His parents are farmers in the village, and they grow maize and beans for their family’s upkeep. Victor was born with a complete absence of fingers on his left hand, which has forced him to learn how to do all tasks with his right hand including cooking and laundry. On March 11th, 2021, eighteen-year-old Victor was injured in a motorcycle road traffic accident. He was a passenger when the motorcycle slid on mud and fell. He sustained an injury on his lower leg, and his leg was placed in a cast shortly after the accident. A few weeks later, his condition worsened and his wounds started having signs of infection. His parents brought him to the hospital, where doctors conducted an X-ray which revealed a left tibia-fibula fracture. Victor is in pain and unable to walk. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On March 25th, Victor will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. After healing, Victor will be able to walk again and engage in his normal activities. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $1,014 to fund this procedure and his family has been able to contribute $100. Victor is a diligent student, and he scheduled his surgery to begin after he sits for his final exams. He says, “I would have wished to undergo the surgery as soon as possible but I am sitting for my exams this coming week. My prayer is that I won’t be in so much pain so that I can sit for my exams comfortably.” Victor’s mother is appealing to anyone reading his son's story to help her raise money for a successful surgery.

75% funded

75%funded
$764raised
$250to go