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Success! Yohannes from Ethiopia raised $1,293 to fund corrective surgery for a birth condition.

Yohannes
100%
  • $1,293 raised, $0 to go
$1,293
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Yohannes's treatment was fully funded on March 31, 2021.

Photo of Yohannes post-operation

April 11, 2021

Yohannes underwent corrective surgery for his birth condition.

Yohannes’ corrective surgery proceeded as planned and he is recovering well. Once fully healed, he will be able to use the bathroom comfortably and also, his mom hoped, he’ll have healthy relationships in the future.

Yohannes’ mom shared, “Most of all, I am so happy for the successful operation. My hospital stay was good. The treatment and care by the staffs are very good. For my boy, I look forward to a good educational opportunity and I will work hard for it.”

Yohannes' corrective surgery proceeded as planned and he is recovering well. Once fully healed, he will be able to use the bathroom comforta...

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February 18, 2021

Yohannes is a 13-month-old toddler from Ethiopia who loves eating noodles and playing with his mom and with other children. Yohannes’ only family is his mother, who lives in Addis Ababa. She used to work as a domestic worker, but after experiencing labor abuse she is temporarily staying at a charity organization.

Yohannes was born with hypospadias, a congenital abnormality that causes urinary dysfunction. Without treatment, he will continue to experience uncomfortable symptoms and will be at risk of infertility.

Fortunately, Yohannes is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on February 22nd. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,293 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care.

Yohannes’ mother is excited for him to undergo the surgery, saying “I pray for my child to grow healthy and become somebody.”

Yohannes is a 13-month-old toddler from Ethiopia who loves eating noodles and playing with his mom and with other children. Yohannes’ only f...

Read more

Yohannes's Timeline

  • February 18, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Yohannes was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Ethiopia.

  • February 22, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Yohannes's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • February 23, 2021
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Yohannes received treatment at BethanyKids Myungsung Christian Medical Centre (BKMCM). Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • March 31, 2021
    FULLY FUNDED

    Yohannes's treatment was fully funded.

  • April 11, 2021
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Yohannes's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 27 donors

Funded by 27 donors

Treatment
Hypospadias
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $1,293 for Yohannes's treatment
Hospital Fees
$1,126
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$40
Supplies
$0
Labs
$65
Other
$62
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Hypospadias is a congenital defect in which the opening of the urethra is on the underside of the penis. The urethra is the tube that drains urine from the bladder. In males, the opening of the urethra is normally at the end of the penis. Symptoms of hypospadias vary. This condition may cause genital malformation and urinary dysfunction. It can lead to infections, social stigma, and infertility.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If this condition is not repaired, it can lead to urinary dysfunction, genital malformation, infertility, and increased risk of urinary tract infections.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Hypospadias is one of the most common birth defects in boys. It is the most frequent congenital urological anomaly, occurring in 1–3 per 1,000 live births.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After surgery, the patient is monitored closely and discharged from the hospital after five days. Stitches will be removed during a follow-up appointment.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The urethra will be corrected, improving urinary function.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This is a low-risk procedure, and the impact of this surgery lasts a lifetime. If the patient has complicated hypospadias, he may need to undergo further surgery. Follow-up visits with a urologist may also be needed, particularly when patients reach puberty.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality care centers in the region. Hospitals lack adequate resources and expertise to treat this condition.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Surgery is not required for mild cases. Otherwise, there is no alternative.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Naw Kwee

Naw Kwee Moo is a 54-year-old woman from the Karen region in Burma, who lives with her husband and their family in a refugee camp. Of her children, three daughters and three sons still live in the refugee camp along with them near the Thai-Burma border. Naw Kwee is a homemaker and her husband is currently too ill to work. Five of their children go to school in the camp, four other children have moved away, and her second oldest son graduated from a post-secondary program in May 2020. He worked as an agricultural day laborer at a nearby Thai village until mid-December 2020. Due to Covid-19 travel restrictions, he was no longer allowed to leave the camp. Naw Kwe’s household receives a monthly cash card to purchase basic rations. Although they receive free education and basic health care in the camp, they shared how hard it is to make ends meet. Starting four years ago, Naw Kwee often went to the camp’s hospital run by Malteser International (MI) Thailand to receive treatment for urinary tract infections (UTI). Most of the time, she would feel better after taking medication, but she was no longer able to work as an agricultural day laborer because of her pain. Over the next few years, she was diagnosed with chronic UTI. “I think my condition was caused from consuming dirty water,” she said. “When I worked as a day laborer, we had no access to clean water.” Naw Kwee received antibiotics through an intravenous (IV) line at the camp’s hospital. When her condition did not improve, a doctor at the camp’s hospital referred her again to Mae Sariang Hospital in March 2020. There she received a urine test and an x-ray of her kidneys, ureters and bladder. She was finally diagnosed with a right kidney stone. After multiple visits, the doctor at Mae Sariang Hospital referred her to Chiang Mai Hospital (CMH) for further treatment. However, Naw Kwee could not travel to CMH for a while due to travel restrictions after the outbreak of Covid-19. Finally, last June medical staff from her camp were able to bring Naw Kwee to Chiang Mai. During her appointment, the doctor scheduled her to undergo an intravenous pyelogram on July 16th, 2020. After she received a diagnostic test, she returned to CMH for her follow-up appointment on November 19th, 2020. During her appointment, she received more tests and it was at her next appointment Naw Kwee was told she needed to undergo multiple rounds of laser treatment to break up the stone in her kidney. She received her first round of laser treatment on February 11th, 2021. Two days later, she developed a fever and could only pass a bit of urine. She also started to experience severe back pain and other troubling symptoms. MI staff took her back to the hospital where she received an ultrasound. The nurse shared with her that after her laser treatment, the stones had broken up and many of them where now stuck in her ureter, creating a blockage. She now needs emergency surgery to remove the stones. Our Medical Partner Burma Children Medical Fund is seeking $1,500 to support her surgery and finally relieve her of her painful condition.

78% funded

78%funded
$1,172raised
$328to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.