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Success! Kar Aung from Burma raised $1,500 to fund brain surgery.

Kar Aung
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Kar Aung's treatment was fully funded on April 1, 2017.

Photo of Kar Aung post-operation

March 13, 2017

Kar Aung underwent brain surgery.

After performing the first surgery, Kar Aung’s doctors explained to his mother that his condition is very complicated. If he underwent the second required surgery, he might lose consciousness or experience complications. Both his parents and our medical partner decided not to proceed with the second surgery, and Kar Aung was discharged from the hospital.

At our medical partner’s clinic, doctors are now treating Kar Aung’s infection with medication. He is slowly improving—he can now move his hands, and his eyes are more focused. Doctors will continue to treat his brain infection.

Kar Aung’s mother says, “We would like to thank all donors and everyone who has helped my child get to this point.”

After performing the first surgery, Kar Aung's doctors explained to his mother that his condition is very complicated. If he underwent the s...

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January 11, 2017

Kar Aung is a one-year-old boy from Burma. One of six siblings, he lives with his mother, father, and older brother on a relative’s farm. His mother hopes that he will become a medic when he grows up.

Hours after Kar Aung was born in September 2015, his mother noticed an abnormal growth on his nose. A few days later, she took him to a private clinic, where the doctors diagnosed Kar Aung with nasofrontal encephalocele. This neural tube defect, resulting from a failure of the neural tube to fully close during fetal development, causes protrusions of the brain through openings in the skull.

Kar Aung and his mother returned to the clinic four times, at great financial cost. Each time, they received medication, but his symptoms never improved. Finally, Kar Aung’s father contacted our medical partner’s care center, Mae Tao Clinic (MTC). In March of 2016, six-month-old Kar Aung and his parents made the long, expensive journey to MTC. Upon examination, Kar Aung was diagnosed with tuberculosis and nasofrontal encephalocele.

“I worried that my son will not be cured, as I have never seen kids like this in my village,” Kar Aung’s mother says. “I will always love him.”

Fortunately, Kar Aung is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on January 13. Our medical partner is requesting $1,500 to cover medications, surgery, transportation, and two weeks of hospital stay. When Kar Aung is fully recovered, he should be pain-free and able to see clearly.

Kar Aung is a one-year-old boy from Burma. One of six siblings, he lives with his mother, father, and older brother on a relative’s farm. Hi...

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Kar Aung's Timeline

  • January 11, 2017
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Kar Aung was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund, our medical partner in Burma.

  • January 16, 2017
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Kar Aung received treatment at Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • January 19, 2017
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Kar Aung's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • March 13, 2017
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Kar Aung's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • April 01, 2017
    FULLY FUNDED

    Kar Aung's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 22 donors

Funded by 22 donors

Treatment
Correction of FEEM
  • Cost Breakdown
On average, it costs $16,764 for Kar Aung's treatment
Subsidies fund $15,264 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$12,229
Medical Staff
$1,332
Medication
$54
Supplies
$795
Travel
$583
Labs
$71
Radiology
$654
Other
$1,046

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.