Larry Pupkiewicz
Larry's Story

Larry joined Watsi on April 26th, 2013. 6 other people also joined Watsi on that day! Larry's most recent donation supported Leang Hor, a construction worker from Cambodia, to fund a hardware removal surgery.

Impact

Larry has funded healthcare for 17 patients in 8 countries.

All patients funded by Larry

Shalo is a nine-month-old infant from Ethiopia living with an imperforate anus. An imperforate anus is a type of anorectal malformation, where the malformed rectum threatens to complication normal bowel movements. An anorectal malformation is discovered upon birth, and is often accompanied with spinal or heart complications as well. Depending on the severity of the malformation, those with an imperforate anus can have chronic constipation, or in more serious cases, may need an emergency colostomy. Shalo was one who needed to have an emergency colostomy due to obstruction of his bowels. Since then he has been unable to independently pass stool, and is exposed to further colostomy complications such as leakages, infection, or obstruction. Shalo is the third child born to his family. His father works as a laborer, and makes approximately $2.40 per day. Since birth, Shalo has needed full time care, and his mother has stayed at home to take care of him and his siblings. With the reduced income, saving for the needed procedure has been difficult. “All I need is my boy to get the treatment and be healed,” says Shalo’s mother. “Then I can get back to my work and help support my family too.” Shalo needs a posterior sagittal anorectoplasty to surgically reposition the rectum and anus and better allow for regular bowel movements. After the surgery, a colostomy opening will be created to allow recovery from the anorectoplasty. Then, two to three months later, a colostomy closure will be done to complete the process. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, tells us that for $1,500, Shalo can have the posterior sagittal anorectoplasty and colostomy closure he needs. The total cost includes the antibiotics, imaging, and inpatient stay. After his recovery, he is expected to be able to independently pass stool and allow his mother to return to work.

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Three years ago, Asiimwe, a 44-year-old husband and father from Uganda, began to feel pain in his left groin. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF), explains that Asiimwe went to a hospital in July of 2015 and was diagnosed with an inguinal scrotal hernia. A hernia occurs when an organ or fatty tissue bulges out through a weak spot in the muscle or tissue surrounding it. Although surgery was advised, Asiimwe was unable to afford it, having used his money to pay for his children’s schooling. “The pain from his hernia is on and off,” says AMHF. “Sometimes it becomes so severe that Asiimwe can’t bend over. He can’t do work or lift heavy items.” Asiimwe is a married father of nine children. His work includes motorcycle transport and small-scale farming--planting and selling tomatoes and maize. However, with his condition it is difficult for him to work in the fields. His wife does not have a paying job, but digs to produce food for the family. Surgery is not financially feasible for Asiimwe, but without it the hernia may become strangulated, a life-threatening state in which the hernia cuts off blood flow to the intestine. $220 will fund the necessary surgery to treat Asiimwe’s inguinal hernia, during which the hernia sac is either pushed back out of the way or cut off. This operation will also eliminate the risk of strangulation and the money will cover not only the surgery itself, but also the hospital stay Asiimwe will need to recover. Once he has healed, Asiimwe hopes to expand his fields so that he can produce enough food and earn enough income to support his family. “Thank you for your kindness to the poor,” shares Asiimwe.

$220raised
Fully funded

Panha is a 25-year-old man with a love for music. He also “enjoys helping his wife at home and watching movies on TV,” shares our medical partner in Cambodia, Children’s Surgical Centre (CSC). In recent months, Panha has been dealing with lingering pain from a serious accident. While driving his motorcycle this past December, “Panha had a head-on collision with another moto,” CSC explains. “The accident caused an open left tibia fracture, a closed left femur fracture, and a finger and wrist fracture in his left hand.” Although his leg was put in a cast immediately after the crash, Panha’s wrist and finger injuries were not diagnosed at the time. As time went on, he noticed that he was having trouble using his left hand, and was experiencing pain in his wrist. He traveled two hours with his wife to another hospital, where he learned of his undiagnosed fractures. In order to regain basic function in his left hand, Panha needs to undergo a procedure known as open reduction and internal fixation surgery on his left hand and wrist. In this two-part operation, doctors will first move the fractured bone back to its proper place, then will insert a device to keep the bone in place. Panha cannot afford this surgery on his salary as an enlistee in the military. But we can help him out. $405 will cover the operation he needs, as well as physical therapy after his surgery. CSC will also check to make sure Panha’s leg is healing properly. Panha looks forward to regaining use of his hand. “I hope after surgery I can hold things with my hand and my arm won't feel so painful," he tells us.

$405raised
Fully funded

“I only want to say thank you, I am so grateful that you will help me again,” says Khin Shwe, a 38-year-old mother from Thailand. Khin Shwe was a previous patient with our medical partner, Burma Border Projects (BBP), and Watsi donors funded a total abdominal hysterectomy to remove Khin Shwe’s uterus after doctors diagnosed her with a uterine myoma. Unfortunately, since that operation, she developed an ovarian mass—necessitating removal of her left ovary through an oophorectomy procedure. “In July, after her first operation, Khin Shwe could still feel the mass in the right side of her abdomen. Now, the mass is 19 cm by 23 cm—it is so large it can be seen through her abdomen and is causing her a lot of physical discomfort,” explains BBP. Along with being painful, the mass is causing Khin Shwe to lose weight quickly. “I want to eat a lot, but I cannot, my abdomen becomes even bigger when I do—it is so uncomfortable for me, I feel stuffed all the time and I cannot sleep well at night,” she describes. Since Khin Shwe returned from BBP’s clinic in Burma, she has been staying with her daughter, who works at a factory, and her husband—a security guard at a local factory. BBP continues, “It is painful for her when she sits down and stands up, she only walks a little and slowly. At home, she can cook rice and clean a little, but she cannot carry anything. She just prepares the curry for when her husband and daughter return from work.” For $1,500, Khin Shwe will undergo a second oophorectomy. This time, doctors will remove her right ovary and the painful, growing tumor. Funding will also cover a seven-day hospital stay, transportation to BBP’s hospital clinic and food throughout her recovery. BBP adds, “After surgery, Khin Shwe will be able to go back to see her father in Burma,” who recently suffered a stroke. “She will be able to help her mother take care of him.” “When I arrived at the clinic, the midwife encouraged me and told me that the organization that helped me before will be able to help me again. I am so thankful that I will get a new life,” shares Khin Shwe. “When I am healthy I will go back to see my father—I know that it will be the last time. I pray for my father—I was so confused I had to think about my father’s condition and my condition so I couldn’t do anything. I couldn’t get treatment because I had to take care of my father.” Let’s help end to Khin Shwe’s medical issues so she can care for her children and her father.

$1,500raised
Fully funded