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Adrian Hon

MONTHLY DONORCEO of Six to Start

United Kingdom   •   mssv.net

Adrian's Story

Adrian joined Watsi on September 20th, 2016. Four years ago, Adrian became the 2364th member to automatically support a new Watsi patient every month. Since then, 4,112 more people have become monthly donors! Adrian's most recent donation traveled 6,200 miles to support SreyNeng, a seventh grader from Cambodia, to fund neck surgery.

Impact

Adrian has funded healthcare for 49 patients in 9 countries.

All patients funded by Adrian

Wai

Wai is a 14-year-old student from Thailand. He temporarily lives with his grandparents and great grandmother in Huay Ka Lote Village in Thailand, but Wai usually lives with his parents across the border in Burma. He came to visit his grandparents during his school break in mid-March 2020 after completing seventh grade, however, he was unable to return to his parents and home when Thailand closed it borders due to COVID-19. His parents are subsistence farmers and they also raise a few chickens, pigs, and goats to sustain their livelihood. When they need money to buy clothes or pay for healthcare, they sell some of their livestock. Meanwhile, his grandparents look after a landowner’s garden and land for 2,000 baht (approx. 67 USD) per month. The income that Wai’s grandparents earn from the landowner is just enough for their daily expenses. Wai is diagnosed with cataract and currently he has lost most of the vision in his right eye and is only able to see light. His right eye also looks red. Aside from that, he has no other symptoms and his eye does not hurt. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund lens replacement surgery for Wai. On June 16th, doctors will perform a lens replacement, during which they will remove Wai's natural lens and replace it with an intraocular lens implant. After recovery, he will be able to see clearly. Now, he needs help to fund this $1,500 procedure. “I want to become a farmer when I grow up and follow in my parent’s footsteps, but I also want to become a nurse if I receive a chance to do so. I overheard my parents say that they don’t have enough money to continue supporting my studies once I graduate from grade eight, so I’m not so sure whether I’ll be able to continue my studies after next year,” said Wai.

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Htay

Htay is a 45-year-old woman who lives with her husband and three daughters in Thae Phyu Village in Burma. Htay and her husband run a small shop selling betel nut and general groceries beside their home, however she has been unable to work due to her heart condition for the past year. Htay’s oldest daughter used to work at a factory in Yangon, but moved back home last year when Htay became too ill to wok. She now helps out at Htay’s shop while also helping with household chores. Htay’s other two daughters are students; one is in grade 10 and the other is in grade four. After she gave birth to her last daughter, Htay began to experience frequent pain in her chest and headaches. Whenever she would lay down, she also felt like she could not breathe well. She then went to Htantabin General Hospital in Yangon where she received an electrocardiogram (ecg). Later, the doctor told her that she has arthritis and Ischemic heart disease, a condition where an organ does not receive enough blood and oxygen. She was given medication and returned home. Htay said, “This medication seemed to help my condition and I continued to buy it from the pharmacy.” In February 2020, Htay’s condition deteriorated again; she felt like she could not breathe and that she was exhausted all the time. Htay and her husband went to Thiri Sandar Hospital in Yangon where she received x-rays and an echo. After checking her results, the doctor told her that she has a large hole in her heart and that she would need to have it closed surgically. Currently, Htay has difficulty breathing, mostly at night, and she feels tired especially when she uses the upstairs. She also has a rapid heartbeat. Htay told us, “I am worried about my condition and I am very sad whenever I think about it. But now I am happy to have found someone to help support my treatment. Once I have fully recovered, I will build a new shop [made of bamboo] because my old shop is starting to fall apart. I will also go back to working with my husband and I will support my children so that they can become educated people.”

80% funded

80%funded
$1,201raised
$298to go
Gideon

Gideon is 6-year-old playful boy. Five days ago, Gideon came to the hospital with a complaint of pain in his right hand, which looked like an obvious fracture due to the deformed and swollen appearance of his arm. He was unable to lift his hand. Gideon sustained the fracture while he was playing with his friends in school. Accompanied by his mother, they walked over 16 miles to get to our hospital to see a doctor and get treated. After the doctor's assessment, Gideon was admitted for skin traction to limit movement and reduce his pain and swelling. Now he has been scheduled for Open Reduction and External Fixation (OREF) surgery on Friday, March 20th. Gideon is the second born in a family of three children. He was born and raised in a small village called Kipkaner where most of the inhabitants work on farms or perform other low-income jobs. His parents did not attend school, so they don’t speak Swahili nor English. The family lives in a small mud hut with grass as a roof. His family gets sustenance from their small farm and consists mostly of millet, sorghum and seasonal fruits like mangos. Gideon likes to spend his days looking after her grandmother's goats. He feels that his grandmother will find it hard to take care of her goats when he is sick. Gideon is in severe pain. He has a hard time sleeping. The family is requesting for financial support for their child to undergo surgery. Gideon’s father says, “I want my son to get back to his normal life. It is paining to see him lay in bed without help.”

78% funded

78%funded
$602raised
$161to go
Ma Ni

Ma Ni is a 30-year-old woman from Burma. In her free time, she likes to pray to Buddha. She and her husband work as government officers. Together they earn 414,000 kyat (approx. $414 USD) per month, which is not enough for any safety net after they pay their bills for utilities and other household expenses. One day in July 2019, Ma Ni stood up from her desk at work and had pain in her hip joints. She had to push her hand against her hips to help her walk. She did not think there was anything seriously wrong so she did not seek medical attention. However, two weeks after this incident, when she was going to work, she slipped and fell in front of her house. Right away her hips started to hurt and two weeks later, the pain gradually became severe. Her condition worsened day by day, although she visited several hospitals and had taken medications. Currently, Ma Ni has a lot of pain in her hips. She cannot walk for more than two minutes or the pain becomes unbearable. She does not feel comfortable when she lays down and has problems sleeping from the pain. She also needs help going to the bathroom and taking a shower. Fortunately, Ma Ni learned about Watsi's medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF). At BCMF's care center, surgeons can perform a total hip replacement to relieve Ma Ni of her pain and allow her to walk easily. Treatment is scheduled for December 17th, and Ma Ni needs help raising $1,500 to pay for this procedure. Ma Ni said, "I had to send my son to my mother’s place in Mawlamyine and my husband also had to ask for leave. [When fully recovered] I want to take back my son from my mother and send him to school. I will support him in whatever he wants to become when he grows up.”

81% funded

81%funded
$1,221raised
$279to go
Gibson

Gibson is a young playful boy from Being the firstborn in a family of two, he loves helping his mother around the kitchen and playing football. When he was two years old, Gibson suffered extensive burns on his left upper body after hot boiling beans spilt on him while playing with his friend in the kitchen. He was taken to the hospital and spent a long time healing. He healed with contractures on his left axilla and had a partial burn contracture release. The surgical site developed infections and he had skin grafting done but unfortunately failed and had a repeat surgery. He was reviewed by visiting surgeons and had skin flap surgery recommended to allow blood circulation. Without treatment, Gibson will be at risk of long term complications on his left hand.Gibson's parents are peasant farmers who rely on the few harvests they get to make ends meet. They are not able to consolidate sufficient funds for their child's surgery. The appeal for financial assistance. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Gibson receive treatment. On September 26th, surgeons at their care center will perform a burn contracture release surgery. Once treated, he will be able to stretch his hand with ease and reduce further infections on the wound. Now, he needs help to fund this $832 procedure. Gibson’s father says, “The doctors have advised on one more surgery to make my son even better but am unable to afford the cost, if it’s possible kindly help us.”

100% funded

$832raised
Fully funded
Mee

Mee is a 53-years-old woman who lives with her husband and two daughters who are studying in grade nine and six at a local high school. Mee’s husband is a carpenter and she is a homemaker. Their income is not enough to cover their expenses. About ten years ago, Mee had joint pain and swollen knees. She went to Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) where she received blood test and vital signs. The results showed Mee has hypertension as well as arthritis. She also found out that she has a goiter related problem. She received one month worth of medication for all three conditions. Since then, Mee went back to MTC every month for follow-up appointment and to received medication. After three years of taking medication, Mee was told that she does not need to take medication for goiter anymore. Up until now, Mee has been going back to the same clinic for regular medication for her goiter. Meanwhile, Mee feels like her goiter has grown bigger. One day, she happened to meet a health worker in her village who told her to go and seek treatment at MTC. So Mee, along with her friend, went to MTC. From there, she was told to go to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for further investigation. Mee then went to MSH the following day and she received blood tests and an ultrasound. With the results, the doctor confirmed Mee has a goiter. He said Mee needs to undergo surgery because oral medication or injection would not decrease the size of her goiter. Currently, Mee cannot sleep well but she can eat well. Sometimes, when she carries heavy things, she feels pain in her neck.

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded