Carolyn Clarke
Carolyn's Story

Carolyn joined Watsi on March 12th, 2013. 1,770 other people also joined Watsi on that day! Carolyn's most recent donation traveled 6,900 miles to support Su, a 12-year-old girl from Burma, to fund surgery to remove her spleen.

Impact

Carolyn has funded healthcare for 227 patients in 18 countries.

Patients funded by Carolyn

Thaw is a two-year-old boy from Burma. He lives with his parents and elder sister in Zee Kone Village, but his family migrated to Thailand four months ago to seek better job opportunities. His father works as an agricultural day labourer, while his mother is a homemaker. Thaw’s elder brother and sister take turns working as agricultural day labourers. Thaw’s mother carefully manages their income, and their combined family income is enough to cover their daily basic expenses. Thaw receives free healthcare services at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC). On 2 July 2021, Thaw was born through emergency caesarean section. His mother noticed on the following day, while cleaning Thaw’s body, that he was born with a worrying condition that makes it challenging to go to the bathroom. Thaw’s mother immediately informed the doctor, who then referred Thaw to hospital in Ayeyarwady Division. Unfortunately, due to a lack of facilities, he did not receive the necessary treatment at this hospital. He was subsequently recommended to go to Yangon Hospital. However, due to financial limitations, Thaw’s mother could not afford to take him to Yangon Hospital, leading her to cease efforts to seek Thaw’s treatment. Fortunately, Thaw was able to defecate through a fistula however Thaw began to experience troubling symptoms, including at present, Thaw is passing stool through the fistula, experiencing constipation with bowel movements occurring every four or five days, with a distended abdomen. Thaw has been diagnosed with imperforate anus with fistula and his doctors recommend a colostomy. A colostomy is a surgery that creates an opening for the colon through the abdomen. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1500 to fund Thaw's surgery at Mae Sot General Hospital scheduled January 31st. Once completed, this procedure will hopefully alleviate him symptoms. Thaw’s mother expressed her concerns saying, “I want my son to have a healthy, long life. I was always worried about him, and he couldn’t receive treatment due to lack of money. Now, with the help of BCMF and donors, he can undergo surgery. Thank you."

$788raised
$712to go

Su is a 12-year-old boy from Burma who lives in an Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) camp with his family. Su had to discontinue his studies while in fourth-grade, and his family was forced to leave their home because of the conflict in Burma. Su’s grandparents are his primary caregivers as his parents divorced, got remarried and moved away. His half-brother, uncle, aunt, and infant cousin also live with the family. Su’s grandmother and aunt take care of their home, while his grandfather, uncle and half-brother work as day laborers. Su initially noticed signs of his condition in January, when he felt pain on the left side of his mouth, and had a slight swelling on the left side of his face. One month later, he was taken to the clinic by his aunt, where it was discovered that he had three cavities on the left side of his mouth. The doctors removed the decayed tooth on the top jaw but left the lower two as the swelling was significant. Su stayed in hospital for one week to recover, while receiving antibiotics. He was released from the clinic once the pain and swelling had decreased, but shortly after, the symptoms resurfaced, more intense than before. Presently, the left side of Su’s face is significantly swollen, and he feels acute pain. He has difficulty eating and can only chew from the right side of his mouth. He cannot lay down on the left side due to the swelling and pain, which gets worse at night. Su also feels pain in his neck when he drinks or swallows food. Su needs to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which X-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This will help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Su's family is however unable to raise the required funds needed for the imaging procedure. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $414 to cover the cost of Su's CT scan and care, scheduled for March 25th. Su is keen to return to school when his condition is treated. He loves to paint and draw in his free time and would like to be an artist someday. Su's grandfather is worried about his condition, but hopeful about his future. He says, “Whatever he wants to do in his future, I will support him fully, as his parents are gone.”

$414raised
Fully funded

Aung is a nine months old baby boy from Burma. He lives with his parents, grandparents, aunt, uncle, and two elder sisters. His father works as a day laborer, while his mother takes care of the household. They also run a small farm where they grow rice for both their family to eat and to earn an income. However, their monthly earning is insufficient to cover their basic living costs and Aung's medical expenses. As a result, they are indebted. Aung was born at home with the assistance of a midwife. Neither the midwife nor the mother noticed any abnormalities at that time. However, the day after his birth, Aung's grandmother observed swelling in his left foot and genitals, as well as a mass on his right flank. Last May, Aung and his mother sought treatment at the public hospital in Yangon, where he was admitted. There, he underwent tests, including hormone evaluations, along with multiple X-rays of his chest, abdomen, pelvis, and both legs. The doctor informed his mother that a rare congenital condition was suspected, and that amputation might be necessary if there were any changes in his leg color or when he reached six months of age to prevent complications. Oral medications and bi-weekly follow-up appointments were provided. Over time, Aung's leg and scrotum swelling worsened. However, due to ongoing conflict near their village and financial constraints, Aung's parents were unable to attend further follow-up appointments. Doctors now want Aung to undergo an MRI, an imaging procedure that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to produce images of bodily organs. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $968 to cover the cost of Aung's MRI and care, scheduled for January 26th. Aung's mother expressed, "I hope to witness my son's full recovery. His condition brings me immense sorrow, and I do not know why this has happened to him. I would like to extend my heartfelt gratitude to BCMF and the donors for helping my son. Once he receives complete treatment, my wish is for him to excel in his education and achieve success in life."

$526raised
$442to go

Residing in Kampong Thom province alongside her parents, two brothers, and two sisters, Sine's family earns their livelihood from the nearby rice paddies. Sine's favorite food is Khmer noodle soup, and she finds she loves Cambodian Studies. During her free time, she engages in reading and enjoys playing with her siblings. When she grows up, she wants to attend a prestigious university and ultimately pursue a career as a doctor. Sine was born with a hairy nevus - a type of birthmark characterized by a darkly pigmented, often raised patch of skin covered with hair. These birthmarks can vary significantly in size and appearance, ranging from small and barely noticeable to larger and more prominent. Hairy nevi are present at birth and are caused by an overgrowth of pigment cells in the skin. While most hairy nevi are harmless, larger ones may carry a slightly increased risk of developing into skin cancer, particularly melanoma. As Sine has gotten older, her insecurities around her birthmark have led to her missing a lot of school. In the pursuit of a solution, Sine and her mother traveled to Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre, the care center of our medical partner, Children's Surgical Centre (CSC) for treatment. The doctors at CSC devised a treatment plan for Sine. On November 15th, 2023, Sine is scheduled for a partial removal of the nevus, with a follow-up in six months for additional planning and removal. Skilled surgeons at CSC will conduct the initial operation, employing skin grafting from her scalp to excise part of the nevus. This intervention aims to restore Sine's confidence, enabling her to resume regular school attendance, and to minimize her future health risks. CSC is requesting $726 to help fund the cost of this transformative procedure for Sine. Her mother shared, "I hope she can feel better and will want to play with her friends."

$726raised
Fully funded

Nageli is an 11-year-old girl, living in a small, remote village in Ngorongoro, Tanzania. She is a diligent student, currently attending primary school. While she aspires to become a nurse, she and her family - her parents and two siblings - live within the confines of a Maasai society, so that her family’s sustenance and income revolve around livestock husbandry. When Nageli was five years old, her mother entrusted her to retrieve a flask of hot tea from the kitchen. On her way back to her mother, Nageli stumbled, spilling the hot tea onto her neck. Due to their village's remoteness, and the absence of a nearby health center, the family administered first aid at home. Because proper wound care wasn't available, Nageli endured a prolonged healing process. While traditional remedies were employed, her wound persisted for three to four months. During an outreach visit to their village, a team from our medical partner encountered Nageli, and informed her parents about a potential treatment for their daughter’s condition. With the aid of their church community, Nageli and her father undertook the journey to our medical partner's facility, hoping to find a solution for the burn scar contractures that have developed, stiffening Nageli's neck, and limiting her neck's range of motion. Fortunately, African Mission Healthcare is helping Nageli receive treatment. On August 16th, surgeons will perform a burn contracture release surgery to ease the stiffness in Nageli's neck, which will improve her range of motion. Now, her family needs your help to fund this $639 procedure. Nageli says: “I wish to walk and have fun again with my friends while going for long walks to fetch water and firewood.”

$639raised
Fully funded