Allan BeaufourUNIVERSAL FUND MEMBER
Allan's Story

Allan joined Watsi on November 7th, 2014. Nine years ago, Allan joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Allan's most recent donation traveled 9,000 miles to support Rosemary, a grandmother from Malawi, to fund stomach surgery.

Impact

Allan has funded healthcare for 115 patients in 14 countries.

Patients funded by Allan

Rosemary is a mother of five children. She lives with her husband, their two youngest children, and 6 grandchildren. Rosemary enjoys chatting with her grandchildren and eating nsima, a porridge made from maize flour and served with local chicken and vegetables. Five years ago, Rosemary started experiencing swelling near her abdomen After visits to different hospitals and clinics, she was diagnosed with an umbilical hernia and was recommended to have surgery. Her symptoms worsened as she delayed treatment and was diagnosed with a hiatal hernia, a condition that occurs when part of the stomach protrudes up into the chest through the diaphragm because of the weakening of surrounding tissues. Rosemary could no longer walk long distances and was experiencing frequent vomiting, loss of appetite, weight loss, heartburn, discomfort, and pain in her chest and abdomen. Rosemary can hardly do anything at home due to worsening pains during activities that add more pressure to the painful area. Rosemary was later taken to Partners in Hope Medical Center and doctors explained the need for a surgical intervention called Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication, a surgery that treats Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD). In GORD, acid from the stomach leaks up into the esophagus (gullet) due to the weakness of the lower esophageal sphincter which leads to failure to close properly. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), can help. On May 7th, Rosemary will undergo surgery that will help relieve her of her symptoms and improve her quality of life. AMH is requesting $1,244 to fund this procedure. Rosemary said, “I can now smile again and look forward to a successful surgery, for me to be well again.”

$756raised
$488to go

Fatma is a 50-year-old mother of seven children aged between four and sixteen. She has faced considerable hardship, being a widow and the sole provider for her family, without a steady income. Fatma resides in Somalia, but also depends on the support of her niece that sells tea in Nairobi, Kenya. Unfortunately, she is unable to afford vital medical treatment. Since 2021, Fatma has been experiencing a persistent bloated feeling and discomfort in her lower abdomen. Initially treated for brucellosis and yellow fever at a local facility without improvement, the growth in her abdomen continued to enlarge, prompting both health concerns and a sense of self-consciousness due to the enlarged mass. She traveled to Kenya to seek medical advice, and further examination in Wajir suggested ovarian cancer, and the need for surgery. However, due to financial constraints, she sought help at our medical partner's care center, AIC Kijabe Hospital. Here, the diagnosis confirmed a large non-cancerous abdominal pelvic mass that needed to be removed through surgery. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping Fatma receive treatment. On March 22nd, surgeons at AIC Kijabe Hospital will perform a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH/BSO) procedure to reduce the risk of ovarian cancer and prevent future surgery for benign ovarian masses. Now, Fatma needs help to fund this $1,260 procedure. Fatma is hopeful as she awaits the surgery that promises relief. She says, “I look like a seven-month pregnant lady because of the growth. It is painful. I hope to get treatment so that this pain can go away.”

$573raised
$687to go

Ko Tin is a 34-year-old man from Burma. He lives with his parents and his younger brother in a village in Yangon Division, Burma. He used to be a driver before his condition got worse but now he has stopped. Currently, Ko Tin is living with his parents who are farmers and support him. The whole family’s income is just enough for their basic expenses and basic health care. Ko Tin has a wife who went to Thailand for work about four months ago but he has lost contact with her. When he has the energy and free time, Ko Tin likes playing football with friends. Ko Tin was diagnosed with a heart condition that requires replacement of the mitral valve, the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. In mid October, Ko Tin experienced fever, cough, body pain, difficult breathing, and severe fatigue when he walks a short distance. After he visited the cardiologist in Yangon Hospital, he was diagnosed with mitral valve regurgitation and doctor recommend that he should receive surgery. Currently, Ko Tin feels tired, coughs often, and is experiencing difficult breathing. Sometimes, he feels pain from his legs and his arms, and he cannot sleep well at night. He will feel extremely fatigued with shortness of breath when he lays down on the floor. He also cannot walk long distances. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Ko Tin. The treatment is scheduled to take place at Pun Hlaing Hospital on December 3rd and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably. Ko Tin said, “I would like to recover as soon as possible. My parents are worried about me, and they have difficulty earning enough money to pay for my treatment. I hope my wife to return, and I would like to live as a happy family.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

David is a 24-year-old male from Kenya. He is the last born in a family of four children raised by his mother. He works at a timber workshop near his home. In June 2020, David was involved in an accident where he was hit from the side by a motorbike. He was taken to the nearest public hospital and received emergency care. An x-ray revealed that he had an open right tibia fracture that needed surgery. Following his initial surgery, he has since had several additional surgeries due to the severity of the injury. In October 2022, he was referred to the care center, AIC Kijabe Hospital, run by our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), for specialized review and care. His doctors quickly realized that he still walks with a limp, and his ankle is stiff with bloody discharge from the incision site. His doctors determined that a deeper examination was needed, and he ended up having a hardware removal surgery. However, the region where the fracture occurred is still severely infected, and he risks losing his right leg due to the infection. The doctors have recommended an additional procedure to remedy the remaining issues and clean the infection. Fortunately, AMH has scheduled David for a second-stage bone transport in hopes of avoiding amputation and helping him walk again. AMH is requesting $1,500 to fund the procedure and provide for David's post-operative care. David says, “I feel exhausted and worried. I am unable to walk despite having several surgeries. I hope this surgery [helps] to save my leg.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded