IndraManoJiMONTHLY DONOR
IndraManoJi's Story

IndraManoJi joined Watsi on August 27th, 2013. Six years ago, IndraManoJi joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. IndraManoJi's most recent donation traveled 4,700 miles to support Benson, a shy toddler from Tanzania, to fund corrective surgery so he can grow up active.

Impact

IndraManoJi has funded healthcare for 128 patients in 14 countries.

All patients funded by IndraManoJi

Benson is a twin two-year-old. His mom shared that Benson is a playful boy but a little shy and quiet compared to his twin brother who is more social and more talkative. Benson’s mother makes a living doing other people’s laundry while his father is a public transport driver commonly known as a “daladala” driver in Tanzania. Their income is not enough to provide for the family's needs and still cover Benson’s needed treatment cost. They are asking for help to support his medical care. Benson was diagnosed with bilateral genu varus. He and his brother were born healthy babies and their growth has been on track until they learned to walk. Benson’s mother started to notice that his legs were not straight as he started to crawl. He took a long time to learn to stand and walk compared to his twin. When he got on his feet and walked, his mother noticed that his legs were bowed outwards. Benson's mother had never taken him to any hospital for help or treatment, she thought he would eventually grow out of it but that has not been the case. His condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, his legs keep bowing outwards, making walking more difficult. One of Benson’s father’s friends advised his parents to seek treatment for him. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Benson. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 7th. Treatment will hopefully restore Benson's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Benson’s mother says, “I would love to see Benson walking normally like his brother but the treatment cost is too high for us.”

61%funded
$543raised
$337to go

Salomy is a sixty-two-year-old farmer, a mother of 6 (3 boys and 3 girls), and a wife to a loving husband who had a stroke in 2010. Salomy is a very responsible woman and able to take care of the family including her grandchildren through small-scale farming and business. She sells Irish potatoes the she grows on her family farm in Malawi. She owns a big farm and used to make lots of produce; unfortunately the productivity has now gone down as she is unable to work or supervise the farm work due to her current health condition. Eight years ago Salomy developed a swelling in the neck and she assumed it would go away with time. When she noticed that the swelling was still growing, she started visiting the nearest health center. At that point then she was able to continue working in her field and do her business as usual. For the past 2 years however, the condition has destabilized her normal life since she cannot breathe properly and she cannot walk a long distance to buy the products she needs to sell. This has been a very challenging part as a breadwinner to sustain the home and provide the required support to her sick husband. Salomy visited a number of hospitals but had no chance to meet a surgeon to discuss how her problem will be solved. A month ago she was talking to a friend who partially knows about Partners in Hope and she asked a relative from Lilongwe to enquire for her. She learned that she could be able to meet the surgeon and traveled all the way from Mzimba to Lilongwe where she is now temporarily lodging at her distant relative’s home just to have her surgery. She met the surgeon who made a diagnosis of goiter and recommended surgical removal of the goiter in a procedure called thyroidectomy. Goiter is an abnormal enlargement of the thyroid gland on the front and sides of the neck. Thyroidectomy, on the other hand, is the surgical removal of the enlarged thyroid gland as treatment for the goiter. Salomy is unable to meet the whole cost of surgery due to her multiple responsibilities and she has no medical insurance. She believes the surgical operation will give her peace of mind, the symptoms will go away and she will continue providing her best support to her family and especially her husband who is unable to do most of the things by himself. The surgery will restore Salomy’s multiple abilities as the main pillar of the family. Salomy says, "My main fear is the responsibilities that I carry as a farmer, a breadwinner, a mother, a wife, and a grandmother. If I go unassisted all these important roles will suffer. When successful, the surgery will not only benefit me but mostly the whole family that I care for."

$1,015raised
Fully funded

Beatrice is a quiet lady in her early 50’s who has been blessed with six children, now ages 14-27. She runs a small grocery at the marketplace to provide for her family. Beatrice's husband doesn’t have a stable job. He does casual jobs across the village such as clearing bushes to meet the needs of his family. Beatrice and her family live in a two-bedroom house constructed with mud. They depend mostly on their daily jobs for food and save a little to pay school fees for their children and bills at the end of the month. A week ago, Beatrice sustained a left arm injury after fainting. Beatrice was brought to Kapsowar Hospital and an X-Ray was done which confirmed a fracture to her left humerus. Beatrice shared that she has a history of fainting and subsequently falling. Beatrice is in pain and she is unable to attend to her normal day-to-day things now. Beatrice is concerned that she can’t cook for her family or run her grocery business due to her injury. Beatrice had a cast applied about a week ago and was discharged to go home to look for funds for her surgery. A week later, Beatrice returned to the hospital with no hope of raising funds for her surgery. Their family is unable to raise the required amount with their low wages only able to afford daily needs like meals and clothing. Fortunately, our medical partner can help. On September 7th, Beatrice will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation procedure. Beatrice will no longer be in pain, she will be able to attend to her grocery business and take care of her family. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $941 to fund this procedure. Beatrice says, “Life has never been the same since I broke my hand. I am worried about my children who need care every day. My hope is to get treated so that I can continue supporting my family.”

$941raised
Fully funded