Kacey CaunanMONTHLY DONOR
Kacey's Story

Kacey joined Watsi on May 24th, 2019. Two years ago, Kacey joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Kacey's most recent donation supported Benson, a shy toddler from Tanzania, to fund corrective surgery so he can grow up active.

Impact

Kacey has funded healthcare for 32 patients in 7 countries.

All patients funded by Kacey

Benson is a twin two-year-old. His mom shared that Benson is a playful boy but a little shy and quiet compared to his twin brother who is more social and more talkative. Benson’s mother makes a living doing other people’s laundry while his father is a public transport driver commonly known as a “daladala” driver in Tanzania. Their income is not enough to provide for the family's needs and still cover Benson’s needed treatment cost. They are asking for help to support his medical care. Benson was diagnosed with bilateral genu varus. He and his brother were born healthy babies and their growth has been on track until they learned to walk. Benson’s mother started to notice that his legs were not straight as he started to crawl. He took a long time to learn to stand and walk compared to his twin. When he got on his feet and walked, his mother noticed that his legs were bowed outwards. Benson's mother had never taken him to any hospital for help or treatment, she thought he would eventually grow out of it but that has not been the case. His condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, his legs keep bowing outwards, making walking more difficult. One of Benson’s father’s friends advised his parents to seek treatment for him. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Benson. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 7th. Treatment will hopefully restore Benson's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Benson’s mother says, “I would love to see Benson walking normally like his brother but the treatment cost is too high for us.”

61%funded
$543raised
$337to go

Kenneth is a moto-taxi driver hailing from Marakwet County in Kenya. Kenneth completed his secondary school education in 2014 but did not proceed to college due to a lack of funds. He lives in a single-roomed rental house and he depends on his low-paying job to pay rent and provide daily needs for his family. During the afternoon on Saturday, November 6th, Kenneth was involved in a hit-and-run road traffic accident with a motorbike when he was headed home from his daily hustle. He sustained injuries on his leg including a fracture of the left femur which was confirmed after doing an X-Ray. Kenneth was brought by his brothers to our medical partner's hospital where his fracture was immobilized and he was admitted to the surgical ward. He is currently unable to use or move his leg. He is also in immense pain. This road accident has been extremely tough for Kenneth and his family since he has been the only breadwinner. Now he is worried about the struggles his family might face if he is not treated. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On November 9th, Kenneth will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. This surgery will rid him of the pain and restore his ability to use his leg. He is seeking financial support to help him undergo the surgery. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,145 to fund this procedure. Kenneth says, “I want to receive treatment [and] walk again so that I can be well and continue supporting my family.”

$1,145raised
Fully funded

Beatrice is a quiet lady in her early 50’s who has been blessed with six children, now ages 14-27. She runs a small grocery at the marketplace to provide for her family. Beatrice's husband doesn’t have a stable job. He does casual jobs across the village such as clearing bushes to meet the needs of his family. Beatrice and her family live in a two-bedroom house constructed with mud. They depend mostly on their daily jobs for food and save a little to pay school fees for their children and bills at the end of the month. A week ago, Beatrice sustained a left arm injury after fainting. Beatrice was brought to Kapsowar Hospital and an X-Ray was done which confirmed a fracture to her left humerus. Beatrice shared that she has a history of fainting and subsequently falling. Beatrice is in pain and she is unable to attend to her normal day-to-day things now. Beatrice is concerned that she can’t cook for her family or run her grocery business due to her injury. Beatrice had a cast applied about a week ago and was discharged to go home to look for funds for her surgery. A week later, Beatrice returned to the hospital with no hope of raising funds for her surgery. Their family is unable to raise the required amount with their low wages only able to afford daily needs like meals and clothing. Fortunately, our medical partner can help. On September 7th, Beatrice will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation procedure. Beatrice will no longer be in pain, she will be able to attend to her grocery business and take care of her family. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $941 to fund this procedure. Beatrice says, “Life has never been the same since I broke my hand. I am worried about my children who need care every day. My hope is to get treated so that I can continue supporting my family.”

$941raised
Fully funded

Yin is a 62-year-old woman who lives with her husband, daughter, son in-law, and granddaughter in a refugee camp on the Thai-Burma border. She is a homemaker, and she loves cooking and cleaning around her house. In her free time, Yin loves to play with her granddaughter. Her husband is retried, and her son in-law is unemployed. Yin’s family receives 800 baht (approx. 27 USD) on a cash card every month to purchase rations. This income is just enough for their daily needs, but they cannot afford to pay other costs like healthcare. Currently, Yin has limited vision and can only make out if it is dark or light outside with her right eye. The vision in Yin’s left eye is starting to blur, and she cannot see far with her left eye. She is worried that she will lose vision in both of her eyes. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund lens replacement surgery for Yin. On June 8th, doctors will perform a lens replacement, during which they will remove Yin's natural lenses and replace them with an intraocular lens implant in each eye. After recovery, she will be able to see clearly. Now, she needs help to fund this $1,500 procedure. Yin shared, "Before my vision started to blur, I used to make and sell mohinga [a type of Burmese noodles]. With the money that I earned from selling mohinga, I was able to buy vegetables for my family. However, when the vision in my right eye vision became blurred, I could no longer make mohinga anymore. I hope that my vision will be restored after I complete my treatment.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Ku is an 11-year-old student from Thailand. Ku lives with his mother, four brothers and a sister in a refugee camp. All of his siblings also go to school, except for his oldest brother, who used to work with their mother as agricultural day labourers. However, since the outbreak of Covid-19 in 2020, they have not been able to leave the camp easily to find work. Ku's father works as a day labourer outside of the camp, but has also been unable to find consistent work due to the pandemic. Ku's family receives some financial support from an external organisation, but it is not enough to cover their expenses, and they shared that they often borrow rice or money from their neighbors. In March 2021, Ku and his friends were playing tag that led him to have a bad fall. Ku had taken off his sandals and left them at the top of a hill. When he ran up the rocky hill to fetch his sandals, he slipped and stuck out his left hand to break his fall, breaking his wrist. Currently, Ku’s left hand and forearm are very painful. He cannot bend his wrist and can only move his fingers slightly. Before his accident, Ku was able to prepare his own meals and set up his mosquito net at night. But now, he needs someone to help him do these tasks. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Ku will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for March 10th and will cost $1,500. This procedure will help Ku use his left hand again and live pain-free. He will be able to cook his own meals again and set up his mosquito net by himself. Now, he and his family need help raising money for this procedure. Ku's mother shared, "After he receives treatment, I want Ku to continue his studies until he graduates and becomes a medic."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Naw Kwee Moo is a 54-year-old woman who lives with her husband, three daughters and three sons in Mae Ra Ma Luang Refugee Camp in Thailand. She and her family fled to the camp in 2006 from Burma. Today, Naw Kwe is a homemaker and her husband is too ill to work. Five of their children go to school in the camp, four other children have moved away, and she proudly shared that her second oldest son graduated from a post-secondary program in May 2020. Naw Kwe’s family receives 2,030 baht (approx. 68 USD) in a month on a cash card to purchase rations for basic food needs. Although they receive free education and primary health care in the camp, Naw Kwee’s family struggles to make ends meet each month. Four years ago, Naw Kwee started going to the camp’s hospital run by Malteser International (MI) Thailand to receive treatment for urinary tract infections (UTI). Most of the time, she would feel better after taking medication, but she was no longer able to work as an agricultural day labourer. Over the next few years, when she increasingly sought treatment for UTIs, she was diagnosed with chronic UTI. When her condition did not improve after taking antibiotics, a doctor at the camp’s hospital referred her to another hospital in March 2020, where she was diagnosed with a right kidney stone. In June 2020, after a delay due to COVID-19, Naw Kwee was able to get to Chiang Mai Hospital for further treatment. There, doctors confirmed her earlier diagnosis, in addition to hydronephrosis, a condition where the kidney swells due to a build-up of urine. Currently, Naw Kwee takes pain medication whenever she experiences pain or discomfort in the right side of her back from her kidney stone. The pain will usually only last for a day before it disappears, but she feels weak. Sometimes she also has cloudy urine and a mild fever. Her appetite has decreased, but she tries to eat as much as she can. Naw Kwee will need to undergo multiple rounds of laser treatment to break up the stone in her kidney. Her first round of shockwave lithotripsy will be on February 11th. Naw Kwee will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, who requests $1,500 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Once recovered, she will be free of pain and will be able to resume weaving and sewing, which she enjoyed doing before having this condition. Naw Kwee shared, “I’m desperately trying to stop the pain in my back from returning. Because of the pain, I can’t even do household chores properly. I can’t sleep well and sometimes I have difficulty breathing. Once I recover, I’ll no longer feel stressed because of this pain. I’ll be able to enjoy my days even though I have some problems related to aging.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded