Priska PederneraUNIVERSAL FUND MEMBER
Priska's Story

Priska joined Watsi on October 13th, 2016. Seven years ago, Priska joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Priska's most recent donation traveled 9,000 miles to support Rosemary, a grandmother from Malawi, to fund stomach surgery.

Impact

Priska has funded healthcare for 93 patients in 11 countries.

Patients funded by Priska

Rosemary is a mother of five children. She lives with her husband, their two youngest children, and 6 grandchildren. Rosemary enjoys chatting with her grandchildren and eating nsima, a porridge made from maize flour and served with local chicken and vegetables. Five years ago, Rosemary started experiencing swelling near her abdomen After visits to different hospitals and clinics, she was diagnosed with an umbilical hernia and was recommended to have surgery. Her symptoms worsened as she delayed treatment and was diagnosed with a hiatal hernia, a condition that occurs when part of the stomach protrudes up into the chest through the diaphragm because of the weakening of surrounding tissues. Rosemary could no longer walk long distances and was experiencing frequent vomiting, loss of appetite, weight loss, heartburn, discomfort, and pain in her chest and abdomen. Rosemary can hardly do anything at home due to worsening pains during activities that add more pressure to the painful area. Rosemary was later taken to Partners in Hope Medical Center and doctors explained the need for a surgical intervention called Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication, a surgery that treats Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD). In GORD, acid from the stomach leaks up into the esophagus (gullet) due to the weakness of the lower esophageal sphincter which leads to failure to close properly. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), can help. On May 7th, Rosemary will undergo surgery that will help relieve her of her symptoms and improve her quality of life. AMH is requesting $1,244 to fund this procedure. Rosemary said, “I can now smile again and look forward to a successful surgery, for me to be well again.”

$514raised
$730to go

Noah is a 3-year-old boy from Tanzania. He is the second-to-last child in a family of 4 children. His family resides in a remote village known in Simanjiro, Tanzania. Noah’s mother is a homemaker and also assists her husband with agricultural activities, given that farming is their primary source of sustenance and income. Noah takes pleasure in helping others and enjoys solving puzzles alongside his friends. When Noah was merely eight months old, he was crawling around the house and ventured into the kitchen alone, just as his mother was occupied with washing chores. Inadvertently, he encountered a pan which slipped from the stove, causing hot water to spill onto the left side of his body, resulting in severe burns on his left armpit and elbow. Noah’s parents swiftly transported him to the nearest medical facility for urgent treatment. After receiving initial first aid, he was subsequently discharged with instructions for proper wound care. Despite these efforts, his wounds took two months to fully heal. Even after healing, noticeable damage to the skin remained on his left axilla (armpit) and elbow, which subsequently restricted the range of motion in his left arm, leading to his discomfort while crawling. The gravity of the situation became apparent to Noah’s parents, who were initially unaware of the necessity for further medical intervention to enhance their son’s quality of life. Noah was diagnosed with burn scar contractures affecting his left axilla and elbow. The contractures tighten the skin around the arm such that he is unable to use his hand without discomfort. Recognizing the significance of their son’s well-being, Noah’s parents humbly seek assistance to ensure he receives the requisite treatment to enhance his quality of life. Fortunately, our medical partner African Mission Healthcare (AMH) is helping Noah receive treatment. On August 14th, surgeons will perform a burn contracture release surgery to enable him to use his hand with ease and improve his quality of life. AMH needs help raising $874 to fund the procedure. Noah’s father says, “We are excited for his treatment as this condition has made him less interactive with his peers, and we are hopeful for a positive outcome from the treatment."

$874raised
Fully funded

Ko Tin is a 34-year-old man from Burma. He lives with his parents and his younger brother in a village in Yangon Division, Burma. He used to be a driver before his condition got worse but now he has stopped. Currently, Ko Tin is living with his parents who are farmers and support him. The whole family’s income is just enough for their basic expenses and basic health care. Ko Tin has a wife who went to Thailand for work about four months ago but he has lost contact with her. When he has the energy and free time, Ko Tin likes playing football with friends. Ko Tin was diagnosed with a heart condition that requires replacement of the mitral valve, the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. In mid October, Ko Tin experienced fever, cough, body pain, difficult breathing, and severe fatigue when he walks a short distance. After he visited the cardiologist in Yangon Hospital, he was diagnosed with mitral valve regurgitation and doctor recommend that he should receive surgery. Currently, Ko Tin feels tired, coughs often, and is experiencing difficult breathing. Sometimes, he feels pain from his legs and his arms, and he cannot sleep well at night. He will feel extremely fatigued with shortness of breath when he lays down on the floor. He also cannot walk long distances. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Ko Tin. The treatment is scheduled to take place at Pun Hlaing Hospital on December 3rd and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably. Ko Tin said, “I would like to recover as soon as possible. My parents are worried about me, and they have difficulty earning enough money to pay for my treatment. I hope my wife to return, and I would like to live as a happy family.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Janet is an 18-year-old student and the second of three children in her family. Her parents do not have regular employment but do work whenever they can get it at a neighboring flower farm. Janet was doing well in her early years, but in 2020, she began falling, and started experiencing headaches, with symptoms similar to epilepsy. Sometimes her eyes were affected, causing blurred vision. She began falling more frequently, and she was admitted to Kenyatta National Hospital, where a brain tumor was diagnosed. Janet had a successful craniotomy (brain surgery). Following the surgery, she developed a limping gait, had difficulty talking, and experienced non-typical body movements. Over time, she seems to have improved as she continues with therapy. Janet started experiencing new symptoms just a few weeks ago. She began crying at night but could not explain her problem. Eventually, it was determined that her left hand was not straightening out and it was suspected that Janet may have fallen and broken her hand without knowing it. An x-ray showed a closed fracture dislocation of the left elbow. Janet's mother was advised to bring her to our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), and their care center. The surgeon has recommended an Open Reduction Internal Fixation (ORIF). This surgery will hopefully mend Janet's elbow. If not treated, Janet will continue to have pain. She may not be able to use her hand, and the fracture may develop malunion, or a permanent deformed healing. Fortunately, surgeons at AMH can help. On September 5th, Janet will undergo surgery. AMH is requesting $1,049 to fund this fracture repair procedure. Unfortunately, the family is not in a position to meet this cost. “My daughter does not even understand what is going on because of her other condition, but I plead for her support so that she can be able to use her hand in the future,” said Janet’s mother.

$1,049raised
Fully funded

Moringe is a 13-year-old boy from a Maasai family in Tanzania. Moringe is the seventh child of his mother and comes from a large family. His father, a livestock keeper, works hard to support his children and family. The Maasai community in Kiteto primarily relies on livestock farming, and Moringe’s father is a respected cattle breeder. Unfortunately, Moringe is currently facing a debilitating physical condition that severely affects his mobility and hampers his ability to walk long distances. In 2022, Moringe began to experience pain in his feet. Shortly after, his knees began to bow inward, leading to the development of a condition commonly known as knee knocking or Genu Valgus. This condition often stems from an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often occurs because of contaminated drinking water. Morinfe's condition affects his daily activities and restricts his participation in important community events and educational opportunities. Due to limited financial resources and the high cost of medical care, Moringe's family hasn't been able to get Moringe the support he needs. Thankfully, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, can help. African Mission Healthcare is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Moringe. The procedure is scheduled for June 6th, and treatment will hopefully restore Moringe's mobility, allow him to participate in the activities he's missed out on, and decrease his risk of future complications. Moringe says, "I hope this chance I got will help change my life for the better. I hope when I go home, I will be able to do most of my activities without feeling any pain in my leg."

$880raised
Fully funded