Hermann SchwärzlerMONTHLY DONOR
Hermann's Story

Hermann joined Watsi on July 3rd, 2013. Five years ago, Hermann joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Hermann's most recent donation traveled 3,900 miles to support Victor, a three-year-old boy from Tanzania, to fund corrective surgery.

Impact

Hermann has funded healthcare for 69 patients in 13 countries.

All patients funded by Hermann

Meet Nahashion: a playful, four-year-old boy in kindergarten. Nahashion is the only child in his family. His mother gave birth to Nahashion when she was very young, so she had to drop out of school to take care of her baby. His father is a maize farmer, but he also does odd-jobs like working on other peoples’ farms to supplement his maize farm. Both parents did not finish primary education (eight years), which poses difficulty when trying to find better paying jobs. The young family lives in a rental house in a small town. After giving birth to Nahashion, his mother was told by a doctor that her child had hypospadias, a disease causing urinary dysfunction. She was very worried about it because it was the first time she heard about such a case. Without treatment, Nahashion will continue to experience uncomfortable symptoms and will be at risk of infertility when he grows up. A few months afterwards, she started searching for treatment and could not find a specialist in the many hospitals she visited. Finally, Nahashion traveled with his parent's many miles from their hometown to arrive at Kapsowar Hospital, where he was seen by a visiting surgeon. They had heard about the specialist after hearing an advertisement on the radio of the urology clinic that is taking place at Kapsowar. Fortunately, now Nahashion is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on June 24th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is requesting $631 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. Nahashion’s mother is optimistic and strong. She says, “I am really not sure what is going to happen, but I am confident that my child will be able to proceed well after the surgery.”

$631raised
Fully funded

Delvina is an eleven month old baby girl from Tanzania and the youngest of three children in her family. Her parents grow maize and vegetables for the family to eat and sell. Delvina was born a healthy child though her delivery was complicated and after three days at the hospital her family returned home happily with their newborn baby. At six months, Delvina started getting fevers and falling ill often. Their family tried to seek treatment at a local hospital but most of the medication they were using only relieved her for some time. At eleven months, Delvina could not sit by herself nor support the weight of her head and was diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. She needs to undergo an endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) procedure, a surgery to drain the excess cerebrospinal fluid and relieve her of the pressure build-up in her head. This procedure will save her from brain damage and give her a chance to grow and develop like other children. Without treatment, Delvina will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,300 to cover the cost of surgery for Delvina that will treat her hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on February 8th and will drain the excess fluid from Delvina's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve her quality of life. With proper treatment, Delvina will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young girl. Delvina’s mother says: “I would love to see my daughter grow up like her other siblings but for her to have that chance she has to have this needed surgery.”

$1,300raised
Fully funded

Jane is a 70-year-old kiosk owner from Kenya. She is a former civil servant who was released from government duty in 2000. Since then, she has since been running a small kiosk that sells vegetables and other groceries. In March 2019, Jane suffered a fracture on her left distal femur with intraarticular extension, meaning the break crossed into the surface of a joint. To remedy this, she underwent surgery with a locking plate. However, the fracture has not healed properly, which threatens her mobility. Doctors are now recommending a another fracture repair surgery to prevent future complications of her condition, including inability to walk. However, this procedure is costly for Jane. The profit she earns from her small business is not enough to cover her basic needs, let alone her medical bills. Jane has been relying on a small government pension to get by. She separated from her husband over 30 years ago and has since been raising her only son alone. Her son is an adult, but lacks a stable job and works as a casual laborer to make ends meet. Thus, Jane is appealing for financial help. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On November 11th, Jane will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. After recovering, she will no longer have difficulties in walking or be in constant pain. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. Jane shared, “I need this surgery to get back on my feet. I am the one taking care of my grandkids since my son has no job. This procedure will help me be able to go get vegetables from the market so that I can sell and continue my business.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Margreth is a six-year-old girl and the second-born child in a family of six children in Tanzania. She is a hard-working girl despite being young and not being able to straighten her left hand after being involved in a fire accident two years ago. Margreth helps look after her younger siblings when her parents are out working on the farm. Her parents say she has not had a chance to join school in fear of discrimination due to her disability. Her parents are small-scale farmers and livestock keepers. They depend entirely on what they harvest from the farm for a living and sometimes they are able to sell milk from their cattle. In 2018, Margreth was sitting around the fireplace warming herself with her siblings when her Maasai clothing caught fire. Margreth panicked and started running crying for help when her grandmother and mother came to her rescue and put the fire out by taking her clothes off. She had sustained severe burns around her belly and the left hand. She was rushed to the district hospital where she was admitted for six months for treatment. The cost of her treatment made her parents sell almost all of their cattle in order to settle the bill. She healed but now she is unable to straighten her left hand which is limiting her in carrying out her daily life activities. She needs to have her hand-corrected, but her parents can’t afford the cost thus they are asking for support. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Margreth receive treatment. On October 12th, surgeons at their care center will perform a burn contracture release surgery so she will be able to utilize her hand with greater ease. Now, her family needs help to fund this $874 procedure. Margreth’s mother says: “Life would be easier for our daughter if she is able to have this surgery. Our problem is that we can’t afford the treatment cost. If it’s possible please help our daughter.”

$874raised
Fully funded