tomstit@gmail.comMONTHLY DONOR
tomstit@gmail.com's Story

tomstit@gmail.com joined Watsi on February 7th, 2017. Two months ago, tomstit@gmail.com joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. tomstit@gmail.com's most recent donation supported Tessy, a 4-year-old girl from Kenya, to fund leg surgery so she can walk again.

Impact

tomstit@gmail.com has funded healthcare for 66 patients in 11 countries.

All patients funded by tomstit@gmail.com

Hla is a 40-year-old woman living with her husband and adopted daughter in a refugee camp on the Thai-Burma border. Hla and her family fled their village in Burma, due to fighting in the area. In January, Hla learned that she was pregnant for the first time after ten years of marriage. Then in March, Hla had to flee with her husband and daughter due to the fighting near her village. They moved in with her uncle, who lives in a refugee camp. Once there, she sought prenatal care at a clinic in the camp, where she was told that she had a breech baby, which would require a Caesarean section in order for her baby to be delivered safely. The C-section is scheduled for May 11th at nearby Mae Sot Hospital (MSH). When Hla told a friend that she does not have the money to pay for her hospital stay, her friend referred her to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), for help with paying for her care. Currently, Hla is eight months pregnant and is worried about her condition and the health of her baby. Burma Children Medical Fund is seeking $1,500 to cover the costs of Hla's treatment, and for the safe delivery of her baby. Hla said, "I was very worried when I heard that I will need an expensive C-section. I could not think of anyone to help pay for my surgery, and I felt stressed about giving birth through a C-section. After I heard from BCMF staff that donors could help pay for my surgery, I started to feel so much more relaxed and less worried. I still worry about my baby being born healthy."

90%funded
$1,353raised
$147to go

Pascalina is a beautiful five-year-old girl. She's is the second-born in a family of three children, and is always notably friendly to those around her. Both of Pascalina's parents are small scale farmers, while her father also seeks out casual laboring jobs to further help earn a living. Pascalina was born as a healthy child, however when she reached one and a half her parents became concerned. At that age they had expected her to be able to stand up and walk, yet she could not. Pascalina was diagnosed with bilateral genu valgus. This is a condition typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, Pascalina couldn't stand or walk, as her legs were too weak. Her parents tried seeking treatment for her and used medication, but nothing seemed to help. By the time Pascalina had turned three, despite her feeble ability to stand and walk for a short distances at a time, her parents began to notice that her legs were bent inward forming knocking knees. Last year they visited a local hospital in their village seeking treatment, however were then advised to go to a referral hospital that her parents could not afford. A year later, having not received any treatment, Pascalina’s legs had become so impacted that she was unable to walk or stand without crying due to the pain she felt. A local priest advised her parents to seek care at The Plaster House, in Arusha, Tanzania. There, through internal funding, Pascalina was able to have surgery on both legs to help correct them. However, given the severity of her condition, the first surgery was not enough to fully correct her legs. As a result, she needs another surgery to complete her treatment and her parents are asking for help to fund her care. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 for corrective surgery for Pascalina. The procedure is scheduled to take place on February 11th. With treatment, Pascalina's mobility will hopefully be restored, which will allow her to walk without pain, and play with her siblings and friends like normal. Her risk of having future complications will decrease as well. Pascalina's mother says, "We could not afford treatment for a long time, but since the first surgery, she has improved. We wish to see her continue improving and be like any other normal child."

$880raised
Fully funded

Salomy is a sixty-two-year-old farmer, a mother of 6 (3 boys and 3 girls), and a wife to a loving husband who had a stroke in 2010. Salomy is a very responsible woman and able to take care of the family including her grandchildren through small-scale farming and business. She sells Irish potatoes the she grows on her family farm in Malawi. She owns a big farm and used to make lots of produce; unfortunately the productivity has now gone down as she is unable to work or supervise the farm work due to her current health condition. Eight years ago Salomy developed a swelling in the neck and she assumed it would go away with time. When she noticed that the swelling was still growing, she started visiting the nearest health center. At that point then she was able to continue working in her field and do her business as usual. For the past 2 years however, the condition has destabilized her normal life since she cannot breathe properly and she cannot walk a long distance to buy the products she needs to sell. This has been a very challenging part as a breadwinner to sustain the home and provide the required support to her sick husband. Salomy visited a number of hospitals but had no chance to meet a surgeon to discuss how her problem will be solved. A month ago she was talking to a friend who partially knows about Partners in Hope and she asked a relative from Lilongwe to enquire for her. She learned that she could be able to meet the surgeon and traveled all the way from Mzimba to Lilongwe where she is now temporarily lodging at her distant relative’s home just to have her surgery. She met the surgeon who made a diagnosis of goiter and recommended surgical removal of the goiter in a procedure called thyroidectomy. Goiter is an abnormal enlargement of the thyroid gland on the front and sides of the neck. Thyroidectomy, on the other hand, is the surgical removal of the enlarged thyroid gland as treatment for the goiter. Salomy is unable to meet the whole cost of surgery due to her multiple responsibilities and she has no medical insurance. She believes the surgical operation will give her peace of mind, the symptoms will go away and she will continue providing her best support to her family and especially her husband who is unable to do most of the things by himself. The surgery will restore Salomy’s multiple abilities as the main pillar of the family. Salomy says, "My main fear is the responsibilities that I carry as a farmer, a breadwinner, a mother, a wife, and a grandmother. If I go unassisted all these important roles will suffer. When successful, the surgery will not only benefit me but mostly the whole family that I care for."

$1,015raised
Fully funded