Sergio Pantoja
Sergio's Story

Sergio joined Watsi on November 5th, 2014. 56 other people also joined Watsi on that day! Sergio's most recent donation traveled 8,800 miles to support Long, a security guard from Cambodia, to fund nerve repair surgery.

Impact

Sergio has funded healthcare for 25 patients in 7 countries.

All patients funded by Sergio

Zin Nwe lives in Burma with her parents, her brother and sister, and her adopted 3-year-old daughter. She is 33 years old. This past February, Zin Nwe began to feel severe abdominal pain. It was so debilitating that she returned home in order to rest and took some painkillers to cope with the pain. Upon feeling slightly better, she returned to work. However, in March, she couldn’t walk and came back home once again. She was having difficulty breathing and it was painful to sleep on her stomach. She was tossing and turning all night worrying about her condition and feeling guilty about being unable to work. Treatment was never sought in Burma because of the expensive costs in which Zin Nwe could not afford to pay. One of her friends had been to Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) before and suggested that she visit. Upon arrival, Zin Nwe received an ultrasound test and a blood test. A midwife confirmed that she has a uterine myoma, a noncancerous growth in the uterus, and would require surgery. As she does not have money for the surgery, Zin Nwe was referred to Watsi's medical partner, Burma Border Projects (BBP), for assistance. Zin Nwe is a strong, hard working, and independent woman. $1,500 covers all of Zin Nwe's medical expenses, including pre-surgery visits, hospitalization, out-patient visits, and transportation to the hospital. After treatment, Zin Nwe is eager to return to work, continue to support her family, and relax by gardening and planting vegetables near her home. She wants to be able to continue to afford school fees so that her daughter can one day be a bright and educated woman.

$1,500raised
Fully funded

“Like most children, Sandra was born normally and this was a great joy to her mother,” says our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). Sandra and her mother live together in a rental house in Kenya. When Sandra turned five months old, she became sick. "She cried most of the time, at times would throw up after feeding and her head size was increasing at a greater rate than the body was. Sandra’s mother knew something was not right and she sought for help in the nearest clinic," AMHF says. When Sandra was diagnosed with acquired hydrocephalus, her mother remembered it to be the worst day of her life. “I was hysterical and couldn’t think rationally—everything slowed down,” says Sandra’s mother. Sandra is now 11 months old and needs treatment for her condition. Acquired hydrocephalus is a condition where an abnormal amount of cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain’s cavities. It could be caused by a tumor, injury, or meningitis. The clinic that made the diagnosis suggested a shunt operation to relieve the pressure in Sandra’s brain. “Operating a small kiosk and having no one to look to, Sandra’s mother, who is a single parent, is not able to raise the needed funds,” explains AMHF. With $615, Sandra will undergo surgery where a shunt will be placed to divert the excess fluid in her brain to her abdomen where it can be reabsorbed into her body. Depending on the particulars of her case, she may also receive an endoscopic third ventriculostomy, where a small hole is made in the floor of the third ventricle of the brain and the excess fluid is drained through there. “Life’s roughest storms prove the strength of our anchors,” says Sandra’s mother. “I have faced many storms in my life, and my anchors have grounded my with hope and strength.” Let’s help Sandra grow up healthy!

$615raised
Fully funded

38-year-old Dah lives in Burma with her husband, her 18-year-old niece, and her three children. Our medical partner, Burma Border Projects (BBP), says that both Dah’s niece and 13-year-old daughter are in school. To support the family, Dah’s son earns a modest income working as a hunter. This past August, Dah felt a palpable mass in her abdomen caused by ovarian cysts. When her symptoms persisted, Dah initially sought medical care locally, but her condition was misdiagnosed and left untreated. Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled masses that develop within the uterus. BBP explains that without treatment, “Dah's abdomen is growing bigger everyday and she suffers from back pain. She did not want to seek treatment for her condition in Burma, because she knows that she would not be able to afford the medical costs.” For $1,500, Dah will receive a total abdominal hysterectomy--removing her uterus, cervix, and painful masses during a single operation. This treatment will alleviate Dah’s immediate symptoms and prevent her condition from recurring in the future. “Following surgery for ovarian cysts, Dah will no longer have bloating of her stomach and back pain,” BBP states. “After recovering, she will be able to commence looking for work in a local clinic.” Burma Children's Medical Fund, an organization that facilitates the transportation and treatment of Burmese people at Thai hospitals, is subsidizing this surgery by $1,421. "I want to get surgery for my condition so I don’t have to worry about that anymore," Dah shares. "When I have recovered from that, I would like to start working in a clinic and helping people. My first priority now is to get healthy and feel better. Then, I can continue with my dreams.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded