Zainab SheriffMONTHLY DONOR
Zainab's Story

Zainab joined Watsi on September 3rd, 2015. Six years ago, Zainab joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Zainab's most recent donation traveled 6,200 miles to support Soriya, a 49-year-old cookie seller from Cambodia, to fund a mastoidectomy so she can hear clearly.

Impact

Zainab has funded healthcare for 71 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by Zainab

Naw Dah is a 40-year-old woman who lives with her husband, four daughters and three sons in a refugee camp in Northern Thailand. Six of her children attend school in the camp, while Naw Dah looks after her youngest daughter at home. Due to COVID-19 travel restrictions, her husband has had difficulty finding work outside of the camp for the past few months. The family survives on money they receive through a food card each month from an organization called The Border Consortium. Since 2016, Naw Dah has suffered from frequent, painful urinary tract infections. After she received an x-ray at a local hospital in April 2020, she was referred for further treatment and diagnosed with kidney stones. She received treatment in September 2020, but at follow-up appointments, the doctor told her that she still had fragments of the kidney stone, and she returned for multiple x-rays and oral medications. During her most recent follow-up in August 2021, the doctor told her that the stones are now 6mm in size and scheduled her for another ureteroscopy. She is unable to pay for surgery and was referred our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), for assistance accessing treatment. On September 3rd, she will undergo a ureteroscopy and now, she needs help raising $1,500 to fund her procedure and care. Naw Dah shared, "I am a bit scared as I already underwent treatment twice, but I really want to get better. So I put my trust in God and I will go through this pain again so that I will be free from this pain in the future."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Joan is a playful and happy three-year-old girl. She's the third born in a family of four. Their family lives in a rental house in a small town in Kenya. Her father works as a shopkeeper, and her mother is a housewife. Joan's father earns limited wages from the business, especially during the difficult times caused by the COVID pandemic. Having been blessed with four children, Joan's father's income is often not enough to cater to the basic needs of his children and also pay for the health care that Joan needs. Joan was brought to the hospital with recurrent tonsillitis and pain when swallowing for more than a year now. She has difficulty sleeping, and breathing when she sleeps. These symptoms are attributed to enlarged tonsils that are blocking her airways. Her mother also reported that when Joan has an active infection, she is not able to feed well and even has difficulty in breathing during the day. Before they came to Kapsowar Hospital, Joan's mother had been taking her to a health facility for treatment with antibiotics, though they have not been effective. Our surgeons have recommended that Joan’s condition is best treated surgically and have booked her for a tonsillectomy. The surgery will improve her general well-being and bring her peace during the night and aid in proper feeding. Joan's family is requesting any well-wisher to support them so that their daughter can undergo surgery. Joan will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare. Fortunately, she is scheduled to undergo a tonsillectomy on April 23rd. African Mission Healthcare is requesting $420 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Once recovered, she will be able to sleep and breathe peacefully throughout the night. Joan's mother shared, “I want my child to get treated so that she can breathe well and sleep well. Thank you for your support.''

$420raised
Fully funded

Jelly is a 50-year-old woman living in Thailand. She lives with her youngest son, cousin, younger brother, sister-in-law as well as her niece and nephew in Mae La Refugee Camp. In the camp, Jelly and her household receive 1,200 baht (approx. 40 USD) every month on a cash card, to purchase rations. Jelly looks after the household chores, while her cousin and her sister-in-law are teachers at a school, each earning 1,000 baht (approx. 34 USD) per month. Her brother is a famous cook in the camp who earns a few hundred baht cooking for public events. Jelly's niece and her son are students, and her other son studies at a migrant school in nearby Mae Sot. She cannot support him financially and he receives a scholarship to study for free. Jelly loves going to church every Sunday with her family, and also loves to play with her niece and nephew. Three months ago, Jelly was brought to Mae Sot Hospital when she developed blurry vision. At the hospital, an ophthalmologist checked both of her eyes. After the examination, the doctor diagnosed her left eye with a cataract, a condition where the lens in the eye gradually becomes clouded. Currently, Jelly can only ascertain if it is dark or bright outside with her left eye. She is unable to see distant things clearly with her right eye. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund lens replacement eye surgery for Jelly. On February 2nd, doctors will perform a lens replacement, during which they will remove Jelly's natural lens and replace it with an intraocular lens implant. After recovery, she will be able to see clearly. Now, Jelly needs help to fund this $1,500 procedure. Jelly shared, "My blurred vision causes me stress and it is difficult for me to do anything. When I cook, the smoke makes my eyes dry so I cannot see anything and now I am in too much discomfort to cook for my family because of my blurred vision.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Jane is a 70-year-old kiosk owner from Kenya. She is a former civil servant who was released from government duty in 2000. Since then, she has since been running a small kiosk that sells vegetables and other groceries. In March 2019, Jane suffered a fracture on her left distal femur with intraarticular extension, meaning the break crossed into the surface of a joint. To remedy this, she underwent surgery with a locking plate. However, the fracture has not healed properly, which threatens her mobility. Doctors are now recommending a another fracture repair surgery to prevent future complications of her condition, including inability to walk. However, this procedure is costly for Jane. The profit she earns from her small business is not enough to cover her basic needs, let alone her medical bills. Jane has been relying on a small government pension to get by. She separated from her husband over 30 years ago and has since been raising her only son alone. Her son is an adult, but lacks a stable job and works as a casual laborer to make ends meet. Thus, Jane is appealing for financial help. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On November 11th, Jane will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. After recovering, she will no longer have difficulties in walking or be in constant pain. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. Jane shared, “I need this surgery to get back on my feet. I am the one taking care of my grandkids since my son has no job. This procedure will help me be able to go get vegetables from the market so that I can sell and continue my business.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Gabriel is a 46-year-old refugee from South Sudan. He is a father of six children aged between 2-19 years old. Currently, Gabriel and his family are staying in the Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya fleeing civil conflict in their home country. In June 2020, Gabriel had an accident and broke his arm. He underwent surgery in his hometown of Juba in the same month and was discharged home from the hospital. However, his left arm started developing further complications, and he was forced to seek treatment in Kenya after his family left Sudan. Gabriel has chronic osteomyelitis of the left humerus and infected hardware in his arm. Gabriel has undergone 3 surgeries, including humeral debridement, hardware removal, and bone cementing. Doctors recommend another urgent sequestrectomy surgery on his left humerus to remove the infected hardware. If left untreated, he risks impediment of blood circulation within the bone leading to bone death and even amputation. Unfortunately, this procedure is costly for Gabriel and his family. He does not currently have a job, nor any medical coverage. Due to the support of well-wishers, friends, and family, Gabriel has been able to raise some money for his earlier medical and surgical concerns. However, he was forced to postpone his surgery due to lack of funds. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Gabriel receive treatment. He is scheduled to undergo a sequestrectomy on December 2nd at our medical partner's care center. This procedure will cost $1,500, and he appeals for financial help to fund the cost of his care. Gabriel shared, “I am in so much pain and there have been so many surgeries for me. I need assistance on this one.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Johnson is a 2-month-old baby boy from Tanzania. He is the last born in a family of three children and was born with a left clubfoot. His condition is causing worry for his parents. They tried to seek doctor's advice from a local hospital and were referred to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center ALMC/Plaster House. Johnson has been diagnosed with a left positional clubfoot which needs manipulation and casting to correct his foot so that he does not grow up disabled. If this condition is not treated Johnson will have difficulty learning to stand and walk when the time comes. He will also not be able to wear normal shoes and walking will always be difficult for him. Johnson’s father works as bodaboda taxi driver to be able to care for and support his family. They also practice small-scale farming where they grow crops for their own family. Their income is not enough to pay for their basic needs and still afford their son’s treatment cost so they are asking for help. Fortunately, Johnson's family traveled to visit our medical partner's care center where surgeons will perform clubfoot repair surgery on October 9th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $890 to fund Johnson's clubfoot repair. After treatment, he will be able to walk easily when he grows up and develop like any other child. Johnson’s mother shared, “We wouldn’t want our son to grow up disabled. Please help us we since we are unable to afford the treatment cost as our income is not enough.”

$935raised
Fully funded