Eric's Story

Eric joined Watsi on December 3rd, 2014. Six years ago, Eric joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Eric's most recent donation traveled 8,600 miles to support Htoo, a 12-year-old girl from Thailand, to fund mass removal surgery.

Impact

Eric has funded healthcare for 79 patients in 11 countries.

All patients funded by Eric

Samuel is a 53-year-old fisherman. He is a father of two children aged 18 and 16 years old. He separated from his wife 5 years ago, and has been taking care of the children since the separation. In December 2020, Samuel was pricked by a poisonous thorn on his foot, which left a wound running from his foot to ankle that has become severely infected. He is in pain and unable to walk comfortably. The wound threatens his mobility and could result in amputation if not urgently attended to. Initially, Samuel tried treating the wound with herbs, but there was no improvement. He visited a nearby mission facility for a checkup and dressing, where doctors treated and washed the wound, but it continued to worsen. On April 1st, Samuel was driven by a well-wisher to our medical partner's care center Kijabe Hospital and upon review, doctors recommended an urgent debridement and skin grafting surgery. However, the cost of care is difficult for Samuel to afford. He had been depending on support from the local missionaries to pay for his previous medical bills and medication. Samuel appeals for financial support. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Samuel receive treatment. On April 2nd, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure to clean off the wound and prevent further infection. Now, Samuel needs help to fund this $1,185 procedure. Samuel shared, “This wound is worsening by the day. I currently limp but I might lose the leg if I don’t get some surgical intervention. My fishing venture cannot even pay for the surgery.”

$1,185raised
Fully funded

Su is a 16-year-old girl from Burma. She has three siblings. Su’s mother is a home maker, and her older brother works as a day labourer. Su and her youngest sister are students and this year Su is in grade seven. Her family's combined monthly income is around 200,000 kyat (approx. 200 USD) per month, which is just enough for their daily expenses, but not enough to pay for basic healthcare. When she has free time, Su loves to play football with her friends at school and she likes to be the goalkeeper. She also loves to read books and watch movies. Su plans to continue her studies as soon as she finishes her treatment. Su was diagnosed with a heart condition that involves a malformation of the mitral valve, the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. Currently, Su still feels tired, but not as much as before she started taking her medication. When she feels more tired, her breath quickens. Su has stopped attending school since she got sick. Although she wants to go back to school, her mother worries for her as her school is a little far and she normally walks there. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Su. The treatment is scheduled to take place on February 12nd and, once completed, will hopefully allow her to live more comfortably. Su's mother shared, “Su really wants to go to school but I worry that the long walking distance from our house to her school will make her tired and worsen her condition. So, I asked her to stay home for a while until she can get treated.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Herrieth is a one-month-old beautiful girl and the firstborn to her young parents who recently graduated from college. Herrieth’s father graduated as a clinical officer, while her mother graduated as a nurse. Unfortunately, both parents have not been able to get an employment opportunity yet. They now help each other make a living through a small business of selling fish in order to be able to raise and take care of their baby. Herrieth was born with a bilateral clubfoot, which her parents were informed is treatable, but due to financial challenges they couldn’t afford the treatment cost. If not treated, Harrieth will not be able to walk properly as she develops and her chances of growing up with disability will be very high. Her parents got to know about Watsi's medical partner and the possibility for their daughter to have her feet corrected, thus they are asking for help. Fortunately, Herrieth's family traveled to visit our medical partner's care center, Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre and The Plaster House. There, surgeons will perform clubfoot repair surgery on January 12th and provide critical follow-up care. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $935 to fund Herrieth's clubfoot repair. After treatment, as she grows older, she will be able to walk easily, run, and play. Herrieth’s mother says: “We would love to see our daughter lead a normal life without the challenges that come along with being disabled. Please help her.”

$935raised
Fully funded

Celina is a young girl from Tanzania. She is the firstborn in her family who already loves school and has made so many friends. She does not know how to read and write yet, but she is very excited to be in school learning new songs and games. When she was one year old, Celina got into a fire accident. Her mother was preparing a traditional beans and maize dish, and during the process Celina fell with her left hand landing in the cooking pot. She was rushed to the hospital to receive treatment, but after the wound healed she had severe contractures on her left hand. When she was almost two years old, Celina received a contracture release surgery on her wrist. However, she still has contractures on her fingers and now needs surgery to release her fingers so that she can use her hand. Currently, she is not able to hold things or do many other things on her own. Celina's parents are not able to pay for her needed surgery. To make a living, her mother sells second-hand clothes, while her father trades in vegetables in the local market. The family appeals for financial support for her cost of care. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Celina receive treatment. On December 11th, surgeons at their care center will perform a burn contracture release surgery to allow Celina to be able to utilize her hand with ease, and become more independent especially now that she has started school. Now, she needs help to fund this $874 procedure. Celina’s mother shared, "Please help my daughter be able to get this treatment. She is growing up now and I really would like for her to learn to do a lot of things on her own."

$874raised
Fully funded

Joseph is a 10-month-old baby boy and the last born in his family to his mother who has eight other children. His father is polygamous with two wives, and the second wife has five children making them a large family of fourteen children. Four children in his family have been able to join school, but the rest have not had a chance to join yet. Joseph's older siblings who do not go to school help their parents look after their herd of five cows and five goats. Both parents depend on small-scale farming of maize, beans and vegetables for their food and are able to sell a goat once in a while to be able to get money to buy other commodities. Joseph was born at home earlier this year with the help of midwives since their nearest local hospital is a long distance from home. At birth , the midwives noticed Joseph had a swell with an open wound along his spine and advised his parents to take Joseph to hospital and seek medical care. They were able to get a small amount of money and took Joseph to a local hospital where he had his wound dressed and were referred to Watsi's Medical Partner ALMC Hospital. At the hospital, Joseph's parents were informed that their son would need to undergo surgery to help correct his Spina Bifida. Without treatment Josep was in danger of getting his spine infected, which could lead to him losing limb movement making him permanently disabled or even lead to death in case of a serious infection. Through Watsi donors' incredible support, Joseph was able to have this life-saving surgery. Unfortunately, he has since acquired hydrocephalus which is putting him in danger of brain damage due to the fluids accumulating in his head, increasing head size and pressure. His parents cannot afford the treatment cost thus they are asking for help. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,300 to cover the cost of surgery for Joseph that will treat his hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on October 12th and will drain the excess fluid from Joseph's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve his quality of life now and in the future. With proper treatment, Joseph will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young boy. Joseph’s mother says, “After my son had his first surgery he was so well, but now his head is increasing in size and he is vomiting a lot accompanied with fevers. Please help save my baby.”

$1,300raised
Fully funded

Bu is a 53-year-old man who lives with his wife, two sons and two daughters in a refugee camp in northern Thailand. He and his family fled there from Karen State, Burma, due to conflict in their area. Every month, Bu's household received 1,514 baht (approx. 50 USD) as part of their camp rations. Bu's oldest son works on farms outside of the camp as a seasonal day laborer. He makes 1,100 baht (approx. 37 USD) per month. The rest of Bu's three children are students, and his wife is a homemaker. Despite receiving free primary health care services and schooling in the camp, Bu's family is struggling to make ends meet every month. Bu started to suffer from back pain and fever in 2015. He also experienced slight discomfort and a burning sensation while urinating. When he went to the camp's clinic, run by Malteser International (MI), he received oral medications. For a few months, his symptoms and pain disappeared, but later on, they returned. Whenever the pain would worsen, Bu would receive more medication from the camp's clinic. On 2 July 2020, when Bu's symptoms worsened, he went back to the clinic to received more medication. Noting that he kept returning to the clinic with severe symptoms, Bu was referred to Mae Sariang Hospital for further treatment. At the hospital, he received a blood and urine test, as well as a kidney, ureter, and bladder (KUB) x-ray. The doctor informed him that he has a stone in his left kidney. The doctor then referred him to Suandok Hospital in Chiang Mai for further treatment. On 29 July 2020, Bu saw the doctor at Chiang Mai Hospital. The doctor told him that he needed to undergo an intravenous pyelogram (IVP), a type of diagnostic test that uses an injection of contrast material to evaluate the kidneys, ureters, and bladder. Once he underwent the IVP, the doctor diagnosed him with a type of kidney stone called a staghorn stone. Bu was then scheduled to receive surgery to remove the kidney stone on 16 August 2020. Unable to pay for his treatment, MI referred Bu to Burma Children Medical Fund for assistance accessing surgery. Currently, Bu experiences back pain and a burning sensation while urinating. He sometimes experiences headaches and cannot breathe well because of the severe pain. In his free time, his favorite thing to do is to help with household chores and grow vegetables for his family. Now, Burma Children Medical Fund needs your help in funding the cost of Bu's $1,500 surgery. Bu shared, “I still experience back pain and a burning sensation while urinating. Sometimes due to the pain, I have a headache and I have difficulty breathing. But I am very excited that I will be free from this prolonged pain after surgery."

$1,500raised
Fully funded