B

Bradley Buda

United States

Bradley's Story

Bradley joined Watsi on March 19th, 2013. 4 other people also joined Watsi on that day! Bradley's most recent donation traveled 8,300 miles to support Pai, a 45-year-old woman from Burma, to treat uterine prolapse.

Impact

Bradley has funded healthcare for 18 patients in 7 countries.

All patients funded by Bradley

Djouvensley

Meet Djouvensley, a 4-year-old boy from Haiti. “He is an only child and is very close to his mother, and shy around people he doesn’t know,” explains our medical partner, Haiti Cardiac Alliance (HCA). “He hasn’t started preschool yet, in part because of his cardiac condition, but his mother plans to enroll him as soon as he has healed from surgery.” “Djouvensley was born with a cardiac condition called double outlet right ventricle, a birth defect in which both major arteries flow out of the same chamber of the heart, creating circulatory problem,” reports HCA. “This leaves him weak and at risk of death if not corrected.” It is important that Djouvensley’s condition is treated as soon as possible. The treatment for double outlet right ventricle is surgery. Upon looking at the heart to decide the best course of treatment, surgeons will proceed to connect the aorta to the left ventricle and the pulmonary artery to the right ventricle. This will fix the circulatory problem and ensure blood flows through Djouvensley’s heart correctly. An organization called International Children’s Heart Foundation is helping with the costs of the surgery. With their generous subsidy, Djouvensley only needs our help in raising $1,500 for the surgery. After the surgery, doctors anticipate that Djouvensley will no longer experience any cardiac symptoms. He will be able to live a normal life and do the things he enjoys without complication. “We are so thankful to everyone who is helping my son,” shares Djouvensley’s mother. “I can never thank you enough but God will reward you.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Thi

“I am very sad that this has happened to my daughter,” says the mother of Thi, a nine-year-old girl who lives with her mother, sister, and grandmother in Burma. Thi and her mother came to our medical partner, Burma Border Projects (BBP), in search of help for Thi, who was healthy and active until she started experiencing dizziness and vomiting during the spring. “Over the course of several months,” says BBP, “Thi has lost the ability to walk unassisted and to write. Her speech is slow, and she talks with great difficulty. The left side of her face has also been paralyzed.” An MRI confirmed that Thi has a brain tumor, causing swelling in her head and making it difficult for her to control the muscles that move her body. BBP explains, “Thi no longer experiences regular vomiting or dizziness, but her symptoms are quite visible. She is very slow to respond to questions, and her speech is sluggish.” Thi is no longer able to attend school because of her condition. Thi’s mother buys and sells goods to support the family, but her daily earnings are only enough to cover a day’s expenses. In the past, she has had to borrow money from neighbors to pay healthcare costs. Given the family’s financial situation, money to pay for treatment for Thi is unavailable. With $1,485 in finding, Thi can undergo surgery to place a shunt that will relieve the swelling and pressure in her head. BBP shares, “It is hoped that Thi's current symptoms will be alleviated, and that she will be able to return to school following treatment.” Thi’s mother shares that sentiment. “I want her to go back to school and eventually become a preacher,” she says.

100% funded

$1,485raised
Fully funded
Naresh

“The youngest of the family, Naresh loves to play pranks on his older brothers; he is the most active of the bunch and never stays still,” shares our medical partner, Possible. Naresh is a six-year-old boy from Nepal. “Naresh lives with his mother and two older brothers, and his dad is the sole breadwinner of the family and has been working in India for the last two years,” Possible tells us. Naresh currently has a fracture of his upper arm. Possible explains, “Naresh was playing on the second floor when suddenly his feet slipped and he fell to the first floor. He started having pain in his left arm and he has been having difficulty moving his hand, changing his clothes, taking a bath, and even sleeping.” Naresh needs surgery to regain mobility in his arm, and increase his quality of life. With $579, Naresh will receive surgery to repair his arm. In this procedure, the bone fragments are repositioned into their normal alignment, and then held together with special screws and metal plates. Following surgery, Naresh’s arm will be put in a cast and he will stay in the hospital for one to three days to ensure he is healing properly. When Naresh recovers he will have full movement in his arm. Possible reports, “Naresh is looking forward to getting back to school and playing with his friends.” "I am really thankful to our supporters for helping with Naresh’s treatment," his mother shares. "A huge burden has been lifted from my shoulders.”

100% funded

$579raised
Fully funded
Sebastien

Meet two-month-old Sebastian, a cheerful baby boy from Haiti. “Sebastien lives with his mother and father; he is their first child, and also the first grandchild in both families, so he gets a lot of attention from his family,” reports our medical partner, Haiti Cardiac Alliance (HCA). “He is usually a happy baby and rarely fusses. His father works in the construction trades, and his mother worked as a market vendor until Sebastien was born.” Sebastien has severe pulmonary stenosis, a congenital defect that results from abnormal development of the fetal heart during the first eight weeks of pregnancy. “His pulmonary valve is too narrow to allow blood to pass freely through it,” explains HCA. “As a result, blood blacks up into his heart, causing heart failure and putting him at risk of sudden cardiac arrest.” For $1500, Sebastien can travel overseas to receive surgery that will correct the width of his pulmonary valve. University Hospital of Martinique is contributing an additional $7,500 toward his surgery. “A balloon will be inserted into the valve to stretch it open to a near-normal size,” reports HCA. “Following surgery, Sebastien’s pulmonary valve should function normally, and he should not need further intervention.” This cost includes passports, visas, pre-departure diagnostic procedures, airline tickets, food support, calling cards to Haiti, a host family stipend, local expenses, and temporary travel insurance. “The doctors explained to me that Sebastien’s problem is very serious and dangerous,” says Sebastien’s mother. “I’m so happy they will be able to fix it, God willing!”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded