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Trisha

Australia   •   Born on April 4

Trisha's Story

Trisha joined Watsi on January 24th, 2016. 18 other people also joined Watsi on that day! Trisha's most recent donation traveled 6,600 miles to support Salim, an 18-year-old student from Kenya, to fund a hearing treatment and a hearing device.

Impact

Trisha has funded healthcare for 58 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by Trisha

Di

Di is a 40-year-old woman from Thailand. She lives with her parents, her husband, her brother, and her two children in Mae La Refugee Camp in Tak Province. Di and her family work hard to make ends meet. Her family runs a small shop selling kitchen utensils. Di's husband is a religious teacher, and he does not earn regular income. Her brother is unemployed, and her parents are retired. Di helps with the family shop while her daughter goes to the community school that is led by volunteers. Her youngest son is too young to go to school. She shared that their family income is enough for family expenses, but they are not able to save any money. Around two years ago, Di was diagnosed with an umbilical hernia. Currently, she experiences pain under her chest and her abdominal around umbilical is swollen and pain. Di is not able to do any household chores because of her condition. The pain worsens after she has meals or constipation, and her stomach will feel as hard as a stone. Fortunately, on January 19th, Di will undergo hernia repair surgery at Mae Sot General Hospital, our medical partner's care center. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund Di's hernia repair surgery. Once completed, the procedure will hopefully allow her to live more comfortably and be well enough to care for her family. Di shared, “Once I am better, I will try my best to take care of my family and my children's education. I want them to study in Thai school. They need to be educated, so I need to be healthy."

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
U Win

U Win is a 54-year-old man who lives with his wife and youngest son in the Ayeyarwaddy Division in Burma. He has three sons and three daughters, with five of his children already married and working. His 17-year-old son left school because they were unable to pay school fees, and worked as a day laborer until COVID-19 happened. U Win used to work as a day laborer as well, but stopped working around two years ago due to his health condition. His family survives on 60,000 kyat (approx. 60 USD) each month that U Win's three other daughters and another son send them, enough to cover their basic expenses. In January 2012, U Win felt tired, had a headache, suffered from heart palpitations, and a rapid heartbeat. He went to a clinic where the doctor listened to his heart with a stethoscope and checked his blood pressure. U Win was told that he has high blood pressure and that he would need to take oral medication for a long time. He received an injection, oral medication, and another appointment for more medication. After he took the medication, he felt better and he went back to work. However, U Win continued to experience worsening symptoms over the next few years, returning to clinics and receiving the same treatment. He was told at one point to visit a cardiologist, but did not do so until later on. In August 2020, during another clinic visit in Yangon, the doctor diagnosed U Win with an atrial septal defect, and said that he would need to receive surgery to repair this hole in his heart. If not treated, the condition could weaken his heart further and cause lung problems later on. He was unable to receive surgery in November due to an upsurge in COVID-19 cases, and was also told the procedure would cost about 3,000,000 kyat (approx. 3,000 USD). Luckily, U Win’s wife remembered that there is a charity group in Yangon that might be able to help. The group told him about our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, to look for assistance with accessing the treatment he needed. U Win currently experiences chest pain and back pain, has no appetite, and cannot sleep well at night. He appeals for financial support for his cost of care. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On December 20th, U Win will undergo an atrial septal defect closure procedure. Once recovered, his quality of life will significantly improve and he will be able to return to work. Now, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. U Win shared, “I want to get better soon so that I can work for my family again. I am worried about my family’s future because we cannot find work in the village. My son also cannot go to Yangon to find another job because of COVID-19 travel restrictions.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Josphat

Josphat is a baby boy from Kenya. Josphat was born with an anorectal malformation, which caused him to not be able to pass stool at all. Eager to see their third-born child treated, his parents immediately came to Kijabe Hospital. The physicians reviewed him and recommended him to first go through a colostomy, which is a procedure where the end of the colon is brought through an opening in the abdominal wall. Though they were not able to source funds for the surgery initially, a member of parliament ended up funding the entire procedure. Next, for the second surgery, a PSARP was performed with the support of Watsi donors. Josphat has successfully recovered from this surgery and is now scheduled for his third and final surgery. This surgery entails closure of the colostomy, enabling Josphat to pass stool normally and preventing future complications. Josphat’s father is a gardener in different people’s homes, and his mother is not working because she provides care for Josphat as he recovers. With no other source of income, Josphat’s parents are not able to raise extra money to pay for his surgery and are requesting financial help. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $650 to cover the cost of a colostomy closure for Josphat. The surgery is scheduled to take place on October 19th and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably and confidently. Josphat’s mother shared with gratitude, “Having received help from this program before, I am again requesting for your financial support for my son and his health.”

100% funded

$650raised
Fully funded
Immanuel

Immanuel is a 2-year-old child from Kenya and the last born in a family of four. His parents are both casual laborers who earn an average of $3 per day. His mother washes clothes while his father works in construction sites where they earn a daily wage. Immanuel’s parent’s income is inconsistent since they depend on the availability of work. In mid-June this year, Immanuel was playing in the kitchen as his mother prepared supper for the family. He dipped his left hand into a boiling pot of potatoes when his mother stepped out to fetch more firewood for the broth. He let out a loud scream which made his mother rush back to the kitchen only to find him burnt and in pain. Immanuel suffered burns on his chest and left arm. He is not healing well and he is prone to infection. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Immanuel receive treatment. On September 21st, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure. This treatment will help clean his wounds and cover them with skin so as to reduce the risk of infection and improve his healing. Now, Immanuel needs help to fund this $1,185 procedure. Immanuel's mother shared, “For over two months now we have tried to source help for my baby to get this needed treatment. Unfortunately, we have been unsuccessful. The wounds are refusing to heal and his elbow has become immobile and stiff. This might affect him now and in the future, if something is not done soon.”

100% funded

$1,185raised
Fully funded
Suzana

Suzana is a kindergartener from Tanzania. She is five years old and the only child to her single mother. She was born a healthy child and has been developing well until earlier this year in March. Her mother started noting her dragging her right leg when walking and lacking strength mostly on the right side of her body. Previously she could run and play freely. She would walk to her kindergarten school with her friends with ease. However, she started having difficulties in all these activities, which made her mom worried.  Suzana’s mother is a single mother working as a cleaner at a local university to make a living. Her husband left them when Suzana was just two years old. Her mom shared that it has not been easy for her to support Suzana on her own and things are now even harder given Suzana’s condition. It took Suzana’s mother a few months to be able to save some money and take Suzana to Arusha district hospital where she was referred to Watsi's Medical Partner ALMC hospital for a diagnosis. At ALMC hospital, Suzana was diagnosed with hydrocephalus which has caused a tumor in her head. She needs to have surgery to help drain the fluids accumulating and thereafter have the tumor excised if possible. Her mother is unable to afford the treatment cost and she is asking for help and support. Suzana has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. As a result of her condition, Suzana has been experiencing general weakness on her right side of the body and dragging her legs. Without treatment, Suzana will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $802 to cover the cost of surgery for Suzana that will treat her hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on June 17th and will drain the excess fluid from Suzana's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve her quality of life. With proper treatment, Suzana will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young girl. Suzana's mother shared, “I would love to see my daughter walk well again, resume school and be able to get back to normal. The cost of the surgery is something I can’t afford. Please find a place in your hearts and help my daughter."

100% funded

$802raised
Fully funded
Ree

Ree is a 44-year-old man who lives with his wife, two sons, and his daughter in Mae Ra Ma Laung Refugee Camp in Thailand. Ree and his family used to live in a village in Hpa-pun Township in Karen State, Burma. However, due to conflict between armed groups in his area, they fled to the refugee camp in 2006. Every month Ree’s family receives 1,244 baht (approx. 42 USD) from The Border Consortium (TBC), an organization that provides support to refugees in camps. He also works as a caregiver for the elderly in the camp, for the organization Catholic Office for Emergency Relief and Refugees. He earns 1,100 baht (approx. 37 USD) each month for this. All of his children go to school in the camp while his wife works as a cook at one of the schools. On March 14, 2020, Ree slipped and fell on his right forearm while he was carrying a heavy load. When he got up, he was not able to move his right hand and he thought he had broken his forearm. Ree did not seek help at the camp’s medical centre and instead wrapped traditional herbal medicine onto his right forearm. As time passed, Ree could still not use his right arm and the pain in his arm did not go away. Eventually, on May 10th, he went to the camp’s hospital, run by Malteser International Thailand (MI). At the hospital, he was diagnosed with a fractured right forearm that had not healed properly. He was referred to the local Mae Sariang Hospital and received an x-ray on May 12th. The result indicated that he had fractured one of the two bones in his forearm. The doctor at the hospital then referred Ree to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center Chiang Mai Hospital (CMH) for further management and treatment. The following day, MI staff brought Ree to CMH. Once he met with the doctor, the doctor told him that he will need to receive surgery for his arm to heal properly. Currently, Ree is still in pain and his right arm is sore and not in use. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Ree will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for May 21st and will cost $1,500. His arm will no longer be in pain and he hopes he will be able to go back to his old job helping the elderly in the refugee camp. While smiling he said, “I have been struggling to do tasks for the past month without using my right hand which is hard as I am right handed. I cannot wait to use my right arm again!”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded