S

Salil Doshi

UF MEMBER

United States

Salil's Story

Salil joined Watsi on November 7th, 2014. Two years ago, Salil joined the Universal Fund and became the 607th member to automatically support a new Watsi patient every month. Since then, 2,354 more people have joined! Salil's most recent donation traveled 8,300 miles to support Khin Wint, an 18-month-old baby girl from Burma, to fund a CT scan after brain surgery.

Impact

Salil has funded healthcare for 28 patients in 10 countries.

All patients funded by Salil

Khin Wint

Meet Khin Wint, an 18-month-old baby girl from Burma. She lives in a village with her mother, siblings, and extended family. Her father has been living and working in Thailand for the past two years, sending money back to his family twice a year. While this income covers the daily needs of the family, it is not enough to cover any extra unforeseen costs—including healthcare. This has become a problem for the family because Khin Wint recently underwent surgery for a rare birth defect known as encephalocele. This means that part of Khin Wint’s skull failed to close completely while she was in utero, and so a portion of her brain and its membranes protruded from between her eyes. Prior to surgery, Khin Wint’s encephalocele had been growing steadily in size and was painful to the touch. Fortunately, through the aid of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), Khin Wint was able to receive an operation to remedy her encephalocele on April 3 of this year. She received Watsi funding for that [surgery](https://watsi.org/profile/b1f990acf80c-khin-wint). Now, however, Khin Wint has a fever. She needs to undergo a CT scan in order to determine whether the fever is due to excess fluid building up in the aftermath of the procedure. If this is the case, the doctor will insert a shunt to drain liquid away from the head and towards other parts of Khin Wint’s body, where the fluid can be safely absorbed. With your help, we can cover the cost of this vital test, set to take place on April 4. $693 will pay for Khin Wint’s CT scan, in addition to her three-day hospital stay and roundtrip travel to the medical center. "I am happy that my daughter has received surgery,” Khin Wint’s mother shares, “but I am still worried about her recovery.” Let’s help put those worries to rest by ensuring that Khin Wint’s doctor has all of the information necessary to oversee her safe recuperation.

83% funded

83%funded
$580raised
$113to go
Bagonza

Bagonza is a 34-year-old married father of five children who lives in Uganda. He and his wife are farmers. However, in the past two years, he has been incapable of farming due to pain from an inguinal hernia. An inguinal hernia is a protrusion of the intestines through a weak region in the abdominal muscles. Its presence makes coughing, bending at the waist, or lifting heavy objects very painful. Bagonza first began experiencing pain and swelling from the hernia ten years ago. He says he lived with this condition for so long because he lacked money for treatment. Due to the pain, he became unable to lift heavy items, dig, or do any straining. His wife was the only one supporting the family, and she did not earn enough money to pay their children's school fees. Bagonza came to our medical partner's care center, Holy Family Virika Hospital, after encouragement from a friend who knew about Watsi. At the hospital, he was diagnosed with a reducible right inguinal hernia and was advised to have surgery. Without treatment, he was at risk of strangulation of the hernia, which might result in loss of life. On November 30, Bagonza underwent hernia repair surgery. During the surgery, the doctor pushed the protruding tissue back into the abdomen and sewed together the weakened muscle with a synthetic mesh. Over time, muscle tissue will grow into and around the mesh to strengthen the area. Watsi's medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $249 to fund this procedure. Funding for Bagonza also covers the costs of a three-day hospital stay, pain medicine, antibiotics, and blood tests. After surgery, Bagonza hopes to work hard and put his children back in school.

100% funded

$249raised
Fully funded
Laraha

Laraha is a 15-year-old boy who lives with his family in Tanzania. He is the fourth of ten children, and he loves singing traditional songs and dancing. Laraha has been herding cattle ever since he was a little boy and has never attended school. Recently, Laraha has been experiencing some knee pain after long days of herding cattle. He usually feels pain in the evenings when he is relaxing. It has also become difficult for him to run because his legs bow inwards and his knees knock when he runs. Laraha’s condition—known as genu valgus—is part of the normal growth and development of the legs and typical resolves on its own by age seven or eight. However, in some children, underlying bone disease prevents straightening of one or both legs and contributes to the strain of the involved knee joints. To improve his gait and reduce the risk of developing osteoarthritis at a young age, Laraha needs corrective surgery known as an osteotomy. During the surgery, doctors will remove a wedge of bone from each upper leg and attach pins, a rod, or a metal plate and screws to close the gap and straighten the leg. Laraha’s parents raise livestock and earn just enough to cover the family's basic needs. With such a large family to support, coming up with enough cash for Laraha’s corrective surgery has been difficult. $940 pays for Laraha's surgery as well as three pre- and post-surgical consultations, three days of hospital care, physiotherapy, medicine, and a three-month-stay at The Plaster House for recovery and rehabilitation. “I hope my legs will be straight like before so that I can continue to herd cattle,” shares Laraha.

100% funded

$940raised
Fully funded
Sao

"I am unhappy that I have right ear pain, and it is difficult to communicate with other people," shares Sao, a 39-year-old wife and mother. She works as a cook and cares for her parents in her home in Cambodia. “For two years, Sao has experienced discharge from her right ear every day as well as hearing loss,” our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre (CSC), tells us. “She has been treated with antibiotics at another hospital, but her condition did not improve.” Doctors at CSC have discovered a cholesteatoma—an abnormal skin growth located behind the eardrum—in Sao’s right ear. A cholesteatoma initially develops as a cyst after chronic ear infections or perforation of the eardrum. Over time, the cyst sheds layers of old skin that collect within the ear. Without treatment, a cholesteatoma can grow large enough to cause hearing loss, dizziness, or facial paralysis. Treatment for Sao is a mastoidectomy, a surgical procedure in which doctors remove the diseased cells in the hollow, air-filled spaces in the skull behind the ears. The cells—known as mastoid air cells—are diseased as a result of the chronic ear infections that spread to the skull structures near Sao’s right ear. Doctors will also remove the cholesteatoma that has grown behind her right eardrum. $809 pays for surgery for Sao as well as two hearing tests, one night in the hospital, one day of inpatient post-operative care, and three outpatient follow-up visits in the month following surgery. “Sao’s ear discharge and pain will stop after the surgery,” says CSC. Sao’s uncle, who accompanied her to the appointment at CSC, looks forward to a successful procedure for his niece. "I hope after the operation is done, Sao's ear discharge will stop, and she can have good hearing and health,” he shares.

100% funded

$809raised
Fully funded