Laurie WilliamsMONTHLY DONOR
Laurie's Story

Laurie joined Watsi on September 2nd, 2013. Six years ago, Laurie joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Laurie's most recent donation traveled 8,500 miles to support Keziah, a 36-year-old mother from Kenya, to fund treatment to remove a large ovarian cyst.

Impact

Laurie has funded healthcare for 86 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by Laurie

Phyu is a 17-year-old who lives with her parents, husband, and two brothers on the Thai-Burma border. Her father and husband work as day labourers, while her mother looks after her two younger brothers. Phyu used to help on small jobs too, but stopped six months ago when she first felt unwell. Beginning last October, Phyu felt tired, experienced chest tightness, and oedema in both her legs. A few days later, she went to a clinic and was told that she has a problem with her heart. She received medication and a follow-up appointment for the following week. Although she took the medication regularly, she did not feel any better. When she went back to the clinic, it was closed due to an outbreak of COVID-19 in their area. While she waited for the clinic to reopen, the swelling in her legs worsened and she also had difficulty breathing. Eventually, her employer drove her to Phop Phra Hospital, where she was admitted and given oxygen. The doctor at the hospital referred her to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) the next day where she received a number of diagnostic tests. The doctor told her that she has a heart condition and diagnosed her with aortic valve regurgitation. The medical team shared that she needed to undergo surgery and told her to travel to Chiang Mai where they can provide the care she needs. Worried about how her family would afford the surgery, once Phyu arrived at the clinic, a medic referred her to our medical partner Burma Children Medical Fund for assistance accessing the treatment she needs. Currently, Phyu feels tired if she walks far or when she has to do anything strenuous such as carrying water or cleaning her house. If she sleeps on her back, she has difficulty breathing. Although she still has oedema in her legs, the swelling has gone down since she started taking medication from MSH. “When I recover from surgery, I want to work to help increase my family’s income so that we can pay back our debt. I also want to support my brother who is attending a teacher training college in Burma. He is a second-year student now," said Phyu with new hope for her future.

81%funded
$1,226raised
$274to go

Ko Myo lives with his mother in a village in Burma. He used to be a motorcycle taxi driver but stopped working two months ago when his health deteriorated. His mother and wife currently care for him, washing clothes and working in a clothing factory in Yangon, earning income to support their family. With the help of Watsi donors, Ko Myo underwent his second round of laser treatment in January 2020, at Mae Sot Hospital in Thailand, to breakup stones in his left kidney. He was scheduled to undergo a third round of laser treatment however, when the Thai-Burma border closed in March 2020 due to increasing COVID-19 cases, Ko Myo was not able to go back to the hospital. He felt better until the first week of December 2021 when he started experiencing a lot of pain in his waist when he sat for a long time. With the border still closed and without enough money to go to a hospital, Ko Myo sought advice. He then went with our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, in Yangon to a clinic in January 2022 and was able to visit our partner's care center, Shin Par Ku Hospital. The doctor has told him he will need surgery on his left kidney to remove the stone and has scheduled him to have the procedure on February 6th. Currently, Ko Myo has little appetite and experiences pain in the left side of his back. He is eagerly awaiting surgery. He shared, "I pity my wife because she has to work hard and support me. Now, I am so happy that I will receive surgery soon," he said. "One day I want to open my own shop in the market and sew children's clothing."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Grace is a two-month-old baby and the second born in a family of two children. Their family lives in a small rented house in Kenya's capital, Nairobi. Her father is the bread winner of the family but he is not employed formally. He does casual electrical jobs and work is hard to come by. Her mother used to sell clothes before she was expecting her baby. Their family does not have national health insurance coverage and cannot raise the required funds for their daughter’s surgery. Grace has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. Grace was born pre-maturely at Kijabe Hospital and was admitted in the nursery for close monitoring and extra care. After spending two weeks in nursery, she was diagnosed with hydrocephalus. At the time, there was not a neuro surgeon locally who could help and she was not stable enough to be referred to another facility. She has been doing well now, and a shunt surgery is scheduled to happen tomorrow as an urgent surgery to help treat her condition. Without treatment, Grace will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $720 to cover the cost of surgery for Grace that will treat her hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 12th and will drain the excess fluid from Grace's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve her quality of life. With proper treatment, Grace will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young girl. Grace’s mother says, “At first I was shocked when I heard about the condition and found it hard for us, but we believe all will be well.”

$720raised
Fully funded