Brooke LoneganMONTHLY DONOR
Brooke's Story

Brooke joined Watsi on October 21st, 2015. Six years ago, Brooke joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Brooke's most recent donation supported Thunchey, a creative high school student from Cambodia, to fund ear surgery so he can hear again.

Impact

Brooke has funded healthcare for 70 patients in 13 countries.

All patients funded by Brooke

Touch is a 31-year-old construction worker from Cambodia. He has been married for 15 years and has one son and two daughters. Touch's daughters are in school, and his son is nine months old and not yet in school. His wife is a factory worker but does not make enough money to support their family's needs. Currently, he and his family live with his mother due to his inability to work. He describes his general health as very poor, especially since his accident. In 2019, Touch was hit by a car and his left tibia was fractured in the accident. His family took him to a government hospital, where they treated him with a skin flap, but the bone was not stabilized and remained unhealed. When Touch returned home, the wound appeared to heal, but he still couldn’t walk. His left knee is very painful, and the wound scars appear infected. Touch now has a knee flexion contracture and can only walk with support. He takes pain medication to ease his symptoms, but it is still too painful for him to walk. When Touch learned about our medical partner, Children's Surgical Centre (CSC), he traveled for four hours seeking treatment. On February 4th, surgeons at CSC will perform knee fusion procedure to help him to walk without pain, secure his left knee, and restore pain-free range of motion in his left knee. Now, Touch needs help to fund this $518 procedure. Touch shared, "I hope that after surgery, my left leg will have no pain, and I can go back to work to support my family."

$518raised
Fully funded

Ko is a 37-year-old father of five who lives with his wife, three daughters and two sons in a refugee camp in Thailand. His family receives a cash card every month from an organization, but this is not enough to cover their expenses. Therefore, he also works as an agricultural day laborer in a nearby Thai village. In his free time, Ko enjoys playing cane ball and spending time with his friends. On December 11, 2020, Ko slipped and fell onto rocks outside of the camp. When he tried to get up, Ko could tell that his leg was broken. He went to the hospital in the refugee camp run by Malteser International (MI). He was eventually referred to a hospital where he underwent surgery to insert a metal rod into his leg on December 25, 2020. When he went back to the hospital for his follow-up appointment on February 3, 2021, the doctor observed that the surgical wound was infected and he underwent surgery to clean his wound. When the wound still did not heal, the doctor referred him to another hospital, where the doctor told him he would need an additional surgery to remove necrotic tissue and replace the rod in his leg. Currently, Ko is experiencing a lot of pain. It is difficult for him to walk and he is worried about his family in the camp. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Ko will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and finally heal. This procedure will allow Ko to walk and his leg to heal properly. The procedure is scheduled for March 12th and will cost $1,500. Ko shared, “I really want to work to support my family as soon as possible. I cannot imagine what life would be like for my family if my leg never heals.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Delvina is an eleven month old baby girl from Tanzania and the youngest of three children in her family. Her parents grow maize and vegetables for the family to eat and sell. Delvina was born a healthy child though her delivery was complicated and after three days at the hospital her family returned home happily with their newborn baby. At six months, Delvina started getting fevers and falling ill often. Their family tried to seek treatment at a local hospital but most of the medication they were using only relieved her for some time. At eleven months, Delvina could not sit by herself nor support the weight of her head and was diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. She needs to undergo an endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) procedure, a surgery to drain the excess cerebrospinal fluid and relieve her of the pressure build-up in her head. This procedure will save her from brain damage and give her a chance to grow and develop like other children. Without treatment, Delvina will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,300 to cover the cost of surgery for Delvina that will treat her hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on February 8th and will drain the excess fluid from Delvina's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve her quality of life. With proper treatment, Delvina will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young girl. Delvina’s mother says: “I would love to see my daughter grow up like her other siblings but for her to have that chance she has to have this needed surgery.”

$1,300raised
Fully funded

Di is a 40-year-old woman from Thailand. She lives with her parents, her husband, her brother, and her two children in Mae La Refugee Camp in Tak Province. Di and her family work hard to make ends meet. Her family runs a small shop selling kitchen utensils. Di's husband is a religious teacher, and he does not earn regular income. Her brother is unemployed, and her parents are retired. Di helps with the family shop while her daughter goes to the community school that is led by volunteers. Her youngest son is too young to go to school. She shared that their family income is enough for family expenses, but they are not able to save any money. Around two years ago, Di was diagnosed with an umbilical hernia. Currently, she experiences pain under her chest and her abdominal around umbilical is swollen and pain. Di is not able to do any household chores because of her condition. The pain worsens after she has meals or constipation, and her stomach will feel as hard as a stone. Fortunately, on January 19th, Di will undergo hernia repair surgery at Mae Sot General Hospital, our medical partner's care center. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund Di's hernia repair surgery. Once completed, the procedure will hopefully allow her to live more comfortably and be well enough to care for her family. Di shared, “Once I am better, I will try my best to take care of my family and my children's education. I want them to study in Thai school. They need to be educated, so I need to be healthy."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

U Win is a 54-year-old man who lives with his wife and youngest son in the Ayeyarwaddy Division in Burma. He has three sons and three daughters, with five of his children already married and working. His 17-year-old son left school because they were unable to pay school fees, and worked as a day laborer until COVID-19 happened. U Win used to work as a day laborer as well, but stopped working around two years ago due to his health condition. His family survives on 60,000 kyat (approx. 60 USD) each month that U Win's three other daughters and another son send them, enough to cover their basic expenses. In January 2012, U Win felt tired, had a headache, suffered from heart palpitations, and a rapid heartbeat. He went to a clinic where the doctor listened to his heart with a stethoscope and checked his blood pressure. U Win was told that he has high blood pressure and that he would need to take oral medication for a long time. He received an injection, oral medication, and another appointment for more medication. After he took the medication, he felt better and he went back to work. However, U Win continued to experience worsening symptoms over the next few years, returning to clinics and receiving the same treatment. He was told at one point to visit a cardiologist, but did not do so until later on. In August 2020, during another clinic visit in Yangon, the doctor diagnosed U Win with an atrial septal defect, and said that he would need to receive surgery to repair this hole in his heart. If not treated, the condition could weaken his heart further and cause lung problems later on. He was unable to receive surgery in November due to an upsurge in COVID-19 cases, and was also told the procedure would cost about 3,000,000 kyat (approx. 3,000 USD). Luckily, U Win’s wife remembered that there is a charity group in Yangon that might be able to help. The group told him about our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, to look for assistance with accessing the treatment he needed. U Win currently experiences chest pain and back pain, has no appetite, and cannot sleep well at night. He appeals for financial support for his cost of care. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On December 20th, U Win will undergo an atrial septal defect closure procedure. Once recovered, his quality of life will significantly improve and he will be able to return to work. Now, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. U Win shared, “I want to get better soon so that I can work for my family again. I am worried about my family’s future because we cannot find work in the village. My son also cannot go to Yangon to find another job because of COVID-19 travel restrictions.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Parani is a young boy from Tanzania. He is now seven years old and the firstborn child in a family of three children. Parani is a very social boy and used to spend time looking after his father's cattle. His parents are small-scale farmers and livestock keepers, and sell milk to supplement their income. Parani has yet to enter school. In 2018, Parani experienced a tragic accident. After a long day, he was warming himself by the fireplace and dozed off, falling on open fire. Parani sustained severe burns on his neck, chest, and abdomen area. He was rushed to the hospital and admitted for two months, but soon his family was unable to afford the high cost of his treatment. Parani's doctors referred him to our medical partner for help with funding. At the time, he had just undergone a surgery that released skin contractures around his neck, which were preventing easy neck movement. Post surgery, his wound took a long time to heal due to multiple infections. Thanks to Watsi donors, he was able to receive funding for a skin graft surgery that covered his wound and accelerated the recovery process. Parani has since healed from this procedure, but still has contractures around his groin area that are limiting his upright gait and cause him to lean forward while walking. With the help of plastic surgery doctors, he has been scheduled for another surgery that will release his left groin contracture. His parents are unable to meet the cost for surgery and ask for your help. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Parani receive treatment. They are requesting $639 to fund his procedure. On October 14th, surgeons at their care center will perform a burn contracture release surgery that will allow him to walk with ease. Parani’s father says, “You have been of great help and support in treating our son for all this period without getting tired, something that has changed his life. He needs to have another surgery which will help him walk with ease. Please help us once more.”

$639raised
Fully funded