Aaron HeiseMONTHLY DONOR
Aaron's Story

Aaron joined Watsi on March 5th, 2015. Seven years ago, Aaron joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Aaron's most recent donation traveled 8,200 miles to support Jane, a loving and hard-working mother from Philippines, to fund a thyroidectomy so she can finally feel herself again.

Impact

Aaron has funded healthcare for 85 patients in 13 countries.

All patients funded by Aaron

Steph lives with his parents and younger brother in a village in Burma. Steph's father works at a nursing home, where his brother also volunteers. Steph is a driver, and his mother is a homemaker. In his free time, Steph likes to grow vegetables and help to repair cars for others in his village. In July 2021, Steph felt pain in the right side of his abdomen, which he was able to treat with medicine from a local pharmacy. Last month, however, his pain returned while he was delivering supplies. He shared with us that he was unable to safely drive home due to nearby military conflict, and was trapped away from home and in pain for two weeks. When Steph finally made it to the hospital, he learned he needed surgery to remove several gallbladder stones. The stones interfere with Steph's breathing and cause severe abdominal pain. He also has jaundice and difficulty sleeping. Fortunately, his doctor was able to schedule a cholecystectomy to remove the stones on February 3rg. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) is requesting $1,487 to fund his surgery. Once recovered, Steph will be pain-free and able to return to work and enjoying time with his family. Steph shared,"I prayed every day that I would get a donor to cover the cost of my surgery, and I feel like my prayers have been answered. I am so happy! I would like to say thank you so much to all the donors. I will never forget what you have done for me, and I hope that one day I can help and volunteer to drive [BCMF] staff in Burma.”

$1,487raised
Fully funded

Nyo is a 58-year-old woman. She and her husband are agricultural day laborers, but Nyo had to stop working two years ago due to poor vision. Since COVID-19 led to lockdowns in April 2020, her husband only receives work from his employer when there is a worker shortage so their income has been very limited. Nyo shared that she likes to meditate with prayer beads and listen to the news about her homeland Myanmar and music on the radio. Nyo is experiencing a cataract in her right eye. She can only see shadows, and the vision in her right eye is worsening. As a result, she cannot do household chores, and her husband has to help her to eat and guide her to the bathroom. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), is helping Nyo receive treatment. On January 4th, doctors will perform a lens replacement, during which they will remove Nyo’s natural lens and replace it with an intraocular lens implant. After recovery, she will be able to see clearly. BCMF is requesting $1,500 to fund Nyo’s procedure. Nyo shared, “If I can’t work or I can’t see, I will have to beg to eat because my husband cannot work. My husband and I were so happy to learn that an organization will help pay for the cost of my treatment. We are thankful to the donors and BCMF.” Nyo added, “When I have money, I want to open a small dry foods shop in my house. This way, when my husband and I are no longer able to continue to work as day laborers because of our age, we can chose a way to earn extra money while staying at home.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Isaack is an energetic 21-year-old from Kiambu County in Kenya. He is the fourth born in a family of seven. His mother works as a housewife and his father works as a small businessman and lives in western Kenya. Isaack works on construction sites and enjoys playing football during his free time. Last Sunday, Isaack was playing football with his friends when he bumped into a fellow player and fell. Instantly they knew his injury was serious because his tibial shaft assumed a C-like shape and begun to swell. Isaack was brought to Nazareth Hospital. The fracture was stabilized with a splint. Isaack was instructed to go home and await for potential surgery while the swelling went down. Upon review by the surgeon, an implant is recommended to ensure he heals. When Isaack was informed of the money required for surgery he asked the surgeon if there was any other treatment option because he had no way to raise the funds necessary and his family was not in a position to contribute to his bill. The surgeon explained that the nature of the fracture requires surgery for proper healing and referred him to the Watsi-AMH program. If not treated the fracture on Isaack’s left leg may heal with a deformity leading to reduced functionality of his left lower limb, thus affecting his mobility, which is an important for allowing him to work and earn money to support himself and his family. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner AMH can help. On September 2nd, Isaack will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. If treated, the fracture on Isaack’s left leg will heal without any deformity and allow him to walk with ease. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,049 to fund this procedure. Isaack remarked, “I look forward to the day I will be able to play on the football field again and go to work with ease so that I can fend for myself as I am used to.”

$1,049raised
Fully funded

James is former motorbike taxi driver from Kenya. He's married and is the father of two children 13 and 6 years old. James' wife is works part-time on a rice farm in their hometown. The family currently lives in a rental house paid for by their local church pastor. In November 2017, James was in a motorbike accident. Due to the accident, he lost his job, and he shared that his life became one revolving around experiencing pain and constant hospital visits. He underwent surgery on his broken leg in a nearby health facility in his hometown. Following the procedure he had a challenging recovery due to infections, causing him sleepless nights and visits to different healthcare facilities. James was finally referred to our medical partner's care center Kijabe Hospital where he underwent several treatments in May. James returned home but later came back to the hospital with a wounded leg that was in bad shape with an exposed bone. The doctors originally admitted James for repair surgery, but determined he needed a below-knee amputation which took place in mid-June. James still experiences a lot of pain, so the surgeon recommend he undergo another round of intense debridement in the amputated area to remove his damaged tissue and help him to finally heal. James has national health insurance, which supported his two major surgeries, but his coverage has been depleted and will not support the care he needs now. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping James receive treatment. On June 25th, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure to prevent the spread of infection and speed up his recovery. Now, James needs help to fund this $1,185 procedure. James wishes to be free from pain, “I, unfortunately, lost my leg due to a sudden amputation, and I am still in shock. I will never be able to use both legs again. I am still in a lot of pain and the wound needs another procedure for me to be well. I need to get out of the hospital and figure out how to take care of my family with my current condition.”

$1,185raised
Fully funded