AUSTIN SHOECRAFTMONTHLY DONOR
AUSTIN's Story

AUSTIN joined Watsi on June 21st, 2014. Five years ago, AUSTIN joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. AUSTIN's most recent donation supported Dora, a future teacher from Tanzania, to fund leg corrective surgery so she can continue schooling.

Impact

AUSTIN has funded healthcare for 61 patients in 11 countries.

All patients funded by AUSTIN

Lah is a 50-year-old woman from Thailand who lives with her husband and her daughter in a refugee camp on the Thai-Burma border. Lah is a homemaker, and her daughter is a middle school student. Her husband cannot work since he was in an accident six years ago. Her neighbor pays for her daughter’s school fees and in return, Lah shares vegetables that she grows with her neighbors. Her family receives about $35 per month on a cash card, but this income is not enough to cover their daily needs. In her free time, Lah loves praying at home and she enjoys going to church every Sunday. Starting from 2018, Lah has been experiencing dizziness, back pain, fatigue, loss of appetite, and lower abdomen pain every day. If she sits for a longer period of time, she has difficulty standing up due to the back pain. Lah cannot walk longer distances because of the pain in her lower abdomen and back. Lah has been diagnosed with myoma uteri, and is advised to undergo a total abdominal hysterectomy. If left untreated, Lah's symptoms will continue to worsen and put her at risk for further health complications in the future. Fortunately, Lah is scheduled to undergo her hysterectomy on June 16th. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Once she is fully recovered, Lah will no longer experience pain in her back and abdomen and will be able to sit and walk without difficulty. Lah said, “I am so happy that my condition is treatable. I will be able to live with my family for a longer time. Now that I know donors may help pay for my treatment, I would like to thank them in advance for helping me. I want to live long, and look after my daughter and my husband. I prayed and God has answered my prayers, so I am very thankful to God and your organization who helped find donors for me.”

91%funded
$1,373raised
$127to go

Ko is a 37-year-old father of five who lives with his wife, three daughters and two sons in a refugee camp in Thailand. His family receives a cash card every month from an organization, but this is not enough to cover their expenses. Therefore, he also works as an agricultural day laborer in a nearby Thai village. In his free time, Ko enjoys playing cane ball and spending time with his friends. On December 11, 2020, Ko slipped and fell onto rocks outside of the camp. When he tried to get up, Ko could tell that his leg was broken. He went to the hospital in the refugee camp run by Malteser International (MI). He was eventually referred to a hospital where he underwent surgery to insert a metal rod into his leg on December 25, 2020. When he went back to the hospital for his follow-up appointment on February 3, 2021, the doctor observed that the surgical wound was infected and he underwent surgery to clean his wound. When the wound still did not heal, the doctor referred him to another hospital, where the doctor told him he would need an additional surgery to remove necrotic tissue and replace the rod in his leg. Currently, Ko is experiencing a lot of pain. It is difficult for him to walk and he is worried about his family in the camp. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Ko will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and finally heal. This procedure will allow Ko to walk and his leg to heal properly. The procedure is scheduled for March 12th and will cost $1,500. Ko shared, “I really want to work to support my family as soon as possible. I cannot imagine what life would be like for my family if my leg never heals.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Patrick has clubfoot of both feet. Clubfoot is a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape, and it causes difficulty walking and even wearing shoes. After he was born, his parents visited the nearest dispensary in their village to take him for treatment, where he was referred to a bigger hospital that would have more resources to treat him. Because Patrick's parents are small scale farmers with minimal income, they decided to return home and save up money so that they could take him to a proper hospital to have his feet corrected. Through a neighbor, Patrick's parents got to know about Watsi's Partner ALMC Plaster House and decided to come and seek treatment for Patrick. Patrick needs to start manipulation and casting, which will help correct his feet. If Patrick does not get this treatment, his learning-to-walk process will be very challenging. It will take a long time for him to be able to stand and walk, and it may be painful. He will not be able to wear normal shoes like other children, and could potentially experience discrimination due to his disability. Fortunately, Patrick traveled to visit our medical partner's care center, Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre. There, surgeons will perform clubfoot repair surgery and begin his treatment on January 15th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $935 to fund Patrick's clubfoot repair. After treatment as he grows, he will be able to walk and play with ease. Patrick’s mother shared, "We wish our son to have his feet corrected but the treatment cost is too high for us to afford. Please help our son.”

$935raised
Fully funded

Maxwell is a 10-month-old from Kenya. His mother shared that he's already a playful and jovial boy together with his twin. Unfortunately, she said, his curiosity accidentally caused him to get a burn on his chest, abdomen, right arm and his feet. If left untreated, he could suffer from long-term tissue damage, prolonged pain, and infections. Maxwell requires a split-thickness skin graft surgery to help heal the burns and reduce the infections. On December 3rd, Maxwell was playing with his twin brother when he pulled down a cup containing hot tea from the table. The hot beverage spilled and burned his body. He was rushed to St Joseph Hospital in their home village of Kangemi and was treated in the emergency phase, and was later referred to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center Kijabe Hospital the additional care he needs. At Kijabe Hospital, Maxwell has had debridement and endoscopy procedures. However, he still requires skin grafting which is scheduled at the end of the week. Since admission, Maxwell has already accrued a bill that his family is working hard to raise, but they are having difficulties. They are requesting Watsi's assistance for his his skin graft surgery. Maxwell has three other siblings and his mother stays at home watching them and taking care of their daily tasks. Their family relies on their father's income for survival and upkeep. Maxwell's father is a taxi driver in Kangemi, who earns a daily allowance depending on the availability of work. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Maxwell receive treatment. On December 17th, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure to The surgery will reduce the chances of infection. Now, Maxwell needs help to fund this $1,185 procedure. Maxwell's mother says, “My baby has been in pain since the unfortunate accident occurred. I know he misses playing with his brother because they are very jovial together. We already have a huge bill that we are unable to afford. We need help with this surgery.”

$1,185raised
Fully funded

Benjamin is a 63-year-old man from Kenya. He is a quiet man who works hard and normally keeps to himself. Two weeks ago, Benjamin sustained an injury on his left hand while coming from his farm. It had rained heavily and Benjamin was rushing home. On his way, he fell on a hard surface and when he stood up, he realized that he could not lift his hand and was feeling pain on his left hand. Benjamin could not access treatment the same day because there’s no health facility near his home. The following morning, Benjamin was accompanied by his wife to a health centre. Because they were not confident of treating him, they just placed a sling on his arm and referred him to a district hospital for further care. Due to lack of finances, Benjamin and his wife returned home to look for money and after three days they were able to go to the hospital. Due to the ongoing medical practitioners strike, no one was there to help them and they finally decided to come to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center called AIC Kapsowar Hospital. The first returned home to look for money to gather for their travel and other expenses. Because of their socioeconomic status, it took them another ten days to raise USD130 through the help of their neighbors. On arrival to our partner hospital, an x-ray was done which confirmed his left humerus fracture. Treatment requires surgery and an implant to fix his fracture. Benjamin was born and raised in a small village called Kamok where most people work in farms or other small unsteady jobs. He has a family and has been blessed with eight children, five girls and three boys. Benjamin never was able to have a formal education so he doesn’t speak Kiswahili, but his local language Marakwet. His family lives in a small mud hut with grass as a roof and they get their food from their small farm, consisting mostly of millet, beans, and vegetables. Benjamin likes spending his days on his farm. He is the breadwinner of the family and now feels distressed because he can’t provide for them due to his condition. He is worried about the obstacles his family would face if his hand will not be treated and also learning that he has arthritis. Their family doesn’t have money to pay for his surgery and his wife shared that this would be "almost impossible" for them. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On September 18th, Benjamin will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. The surgery will help him regain utility of his hand and be free from pain and any other complications arising from untreated fractures. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,016 to fund this procedure. Benjamin shared with us, “I just want not to be in pain anymore and be healthy and happy and have a good life because my family needs me the most.”

$1,016raised
Fully funded