Matt FinneranMONTHLY DONOR
Matt's Story

Matt joined Watsi on December 25th, 2013. Four years ago, Matt joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Matt's most recent donation traveled 8,500 miles to support Victor, an energetic 8th grader from Kenya, to fund corrective surgery for his birth condition.

Impact

Matt has funded healthcare for 91 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by Matt

When Brandon was one week old, his mother noticed that he had not passed stool since he was born, and his stomach was swollen and painful. His mother took him to a nearby facility for examination, where Brandon was immediately referred to another facility in Nairobi. However, due to financial difficulties, they cannot travel to Nairobi and instead went to a larger, nearby facility. When they arrived, Brandon was examined and given medication for him to pass stool. The medication worked to alleviate Brandon's discomfort, so he was discharged a few days after. However, after a few months, the medication became less effective and Brandon had to be taken to the clinic again. Brandon was admitted as an emergency patient and was given new medications, which were ineffective. His condition worsened. Fortunately, he was then referred to BethanyKids Hospital, a care center of our medical partner African Mission Healthcare (AMH). Upon arrival to BethanyKids, he was examined again and after tests he has been diagnosed with problems in his colon. Brandon now requires a special surgery to finally treat his condition. Brandon is the youngest in a family of five children. His father was working as a security guard and was the breadwinner of the family, but passed away when Brandon was six months old. Brandon's mother does not have a stable job, and it is getting more difficult as work becomes scarce. Without medical insurance to pay for Brandon's procedure, his mother and AMH are requesting $743 to help pay for the expenses. Brandon’s mother appreciates the support, “I am very happy to hear that my son will be treated and grow up as a normal child. I am just requesting for any help so he may be treated.”

$743raised
Fully funded

Eh is a 16-year-old boy who lives with his parents and cousin in the refugee camp in Mae Hong Son Province in Thailand. His family receives 1,180 baht (approx. 39 USD) every month on a food card from the organization The Border Consortium. This amount is not enough to cover their daily needs despite receiving free basic health care and education in the camp. To help make ends meet, Eh’s father works as a security guard in the camp too, earning 800 baht (approx. 27 USD) in a month. In addition to this, Eh’s mother and cousin work as day labourers whenever they find work. Eh also works with them during his summer vacations. In May, Eh climbed up a ladder to lay down and rest in a bamboo hut on stilts. While trying to sit down, one of the bamboo sticks rolled out from under him and Eh fell through the floor of the hut. Putting out his left arm subconsciously to break his fall, Eh ended up landing on that arm. Currently, Eh's arm is in a sling and he is taking pain medication to control the pain. If he moves his left arm or tries to lift his arm, he feels a lot of pain. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Eh will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for May 28th and will cost $1,500. This procedure will help Eh be able to use his arm again and he will no longer be in pain after surgery. Eh shared, “I want to become a literature teacher as it is my favorite subject. After surgery, I hope that I can go back to school with my arm healed."

90%funded
$1,354raised
$146to go

So is a nine-year-old boy who lives with his parents, sister and brother in a village in Tak Province. Since schools closed due to Covid-19, So and his siblings have had to stop studying. So now helps out around the house, watering their garden and helping his mother with preparing meals. His sister works as a dishwasher at a Thai noodle soup shop. His father works at a construction site, and his mother is a homemaker. Their monthly household income is just enough to cover their basic expenses. When So was born, the medic noticed that So had a mass on the right side of his neck. Upon pressing the mass with his finger, So did not react, so the medic assumed the mass was not painful. The medic told So’s parents that the mass was fatty tissue and that they had nothing to worry about for now, but he would need to receive surgery to remove it when he was older. As So grew, the mass also slowly increased in size and became heavier. Currently, the muscles in his neck are stiff and the mass is painful when it is touched. Frequently, he will wake up in the middle of the night in pain after he turns in his sleep, putting pressure on the mass. So underwent a CT scan at the hospital, which indicated that the mass is a lymphangioma, or a noncancerous fluid-filled cyst. The doctor recommended that So undergo a cyst excision procedure to remove the cyst. So told us he's extremely excited to receive surgery and is not afraid to undergo the procedure because he wants to look (even more) handsome afterwards :). However, he and his family need financial support to afford the cost of his care. So will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund. Fortunately, he is scheduled to undergo a cyst excision procedure on April 23rd. Our partner is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. Once recovered, he will be free of pain and will feel more comfortable and confident in his daily life activities and when spending time with his friends. So shared, “I cannot wait to receive surgery and I really want this mass to go away. I am so embarrassed of this mass but once it is gone, I will go back to school and my friends will no longer tease me.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Alex is a 20-year-old high school student from Haiti. He lives with his parents and younger brother in a neighborhood of Port-au-Prince. When he's healthy, he enjoys dancing and playing drums in church. Before his most recent illness, he was in his final year of high school. Alex has a cardiac condition called mitral regurgitation. When Alex was a child, he became infected with rheumatic fever which severely damaged one of his heart valves so that it could no longer pump blood through his body. Four years ago, surgeons in the Cayman Islands repaired Alex's existing heart valve in order to avoid replacing it with an artificial valve. This repaired valve worked well for three years, but then began to have difficulty pumping blood as well. Doctors now need to implant an artificial valve to replace the valve that is no longer working well. Alex will fly to the Cayman Islands to receive treatment. On April 7th, he will undergo cardiac surgery, during which surgeons will remove Alex's damaged valve and implant a mechanical replacement valve. Another organization, Have a Heart Cayman Islands, is contributing $20,000 to pay for surgery. Alex's family also needs help to fund the costs of surgery prep. The $1,500 bill covers labs, medicines, and checkup and followup appointments. It also supports passport obtainment and the social workers from our medical partner, Haiti Cardiac Alliance, who will accompany Alex's family overseas. Alex shared, "I am looking forward to this surgery so that I can get back to attending school and going to church."

$1,500raised
Fully funded