Matt's Story

Matt joined Watsi on December 25th, 2013. Seven years ago, Matt joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Matt's most recent donation traveled 8,700 miles to support Naylah, a three-year-old girl from Tanzania, to fund corrective surgery for her legs.

Impact

Matt has funded healthcare for 130 patients in 14 countries.

Patients funded by Matt

Naylah is a three-year-old girl from Tanzania. She is the fourth child in a family of five children. She has a twin and they are very close to each other. Naylah and her four siblings are raised by a single mother as their father abandoned them. She has found a means to earn a living by cooking and selling fried fish by the roadside. However, the money she makes is not enough to cover all their expenses. Naylah was diagnosed with bilateral genu varus. Her legs began bowing outward, impacting her mobility. Several factors could cause this condition, such as growth disorders, vitamin deficiencies, or excessive fluoride found in contaminated drinking water. As a result, Naylah feels pain while walking and gets tired easily, spending less time playing with her siblings. Her mother is unable to find treatment for her due to their financial situation. A well-wisher who saw Naylah informed them about our medical partner's care center, Kafika House, where they can seek treatment for free. He also provided transportation money to get to the facility. Doctors examined Naylah and determined they can provide surgery and care for her. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery and treatment for Naylah at Kafika House. The procedure is scheduled to take place on May 28th. The treatment will hopefully restore Naylah's mobility, allow her to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease her risk of future complications. Naylah’s mother says: “I hope my daughter gets treatment. It will be good for Naylah and her twin to grow older enjoying life together. I hope this treatment will make her legs better.”

$240raised
$640to go

Ko Tin is a 34-year-old man from Burma. He lives with his parents and his younger brother in a village in Yangon Division, Burma. He used to be a driver before his condition got worse but now he has stopped. Currently, Ko Tin is living with his parents who are farmers and support him. The whole family’s income is just enough for their basic expenses and basic health care. Ko Tin has a wife who went to Thailand for work about four months ago but he has lost contact with her. When he has the energy and free time, Ko Tin likes playing football with friends. Ko Tin was diagnosed with a heart condition that requires replacement of the mitral valve, the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. In mid October, Ko Tin experienced fever, cough, body pain, difficult breathing, and severe fatigue when he walks a short distance. After he visited the cardiologist in Yangon Hospital, he was diagnosed with mitral valve regurgitation and doctor recommend that he should receive surgery. Currently, Ko Tin feels tired, coughs often, and is experiencing difficult breathing. Sometimes, he feels pain from his legs and his arms, and he cannot sleep well at night. He will feel extremely fatigued with shortness of breath when he lays down on the floor. He also cannot walk long distances. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Ko Tin. The treatment is scheduled to take place at Pun Hlaing Hospital on December 3rd and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably. Ko Tin said, “I would like to recover as soon as possible. My parents are worried about me, and they have difficulty earning enough money to pay for my treatment. I hope my wife to return, and I would like to live as a happy family.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Faith is a 24-year-old woman from the Rift valley in Kenya who has had epilepsy since 2018. On December 15th, 2023 she had a convulsive episode and fell on an open flame in her kitchen. She sustained third degree burns on her right arm and was rushed to the nearest hospital. She was admitted for three days and received IV fluids, pain medication, and wound care before going home. Since her injuries did not improve, she went to Kapsowar Hospital and was diagnosed with third degree burns from her right elbow to her hand. She had no sensation in her forearm and fingers, no range of motion of the wrist and elbow, and was experiencing discharge and swelling. She also had exposed tendons and blood clots. Faith was scheduled for a procedure to remove the dead tissue from her arm, then for amputation of her second, third, fourth and fifth fingers in order to salvage the hand. At this point, it was determined she needed a further procedure and skin graft of her arm, along with major reconstruction in order to promote healing. Faith is the youngest in a family of six children. She could not finish her schooling due her epilepsy. Her parents are farmers working on two acres of land growing maize, beans and potatoes to provide for the needs of their children. Faith is not insured since she is over age and not covered by parents’ insurance. Her parents are unable to afford Faith's surgery and they thought she would be covered by the insurance. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $1,089 to fund Faith's surgery. Faith said, “I have been in a lot of pain especially when having daily dressing changes, please help me so that I get well soon and be free from this pain.”

$461raised
$628to go

Aung is a nine months old baby boy from Burma. He lives with his parents, grandparents, aunt, uncle, and two elder sisters. His father works as a day laborer, while his mother takes care of the household. They also run a small farm where they grow rice for both their family to eat and to earn an income. However, their monthly earning is insufficient to cover their basic living costs and Aung's medical expenses. As a result, they are indebted. Aung was born at home with the assistance of a midwife. Neither the midwife nor the mother noticed any abnormalities at that time. However, the day after his birth, Aung's grandmother observed swelling in his left foot and genitals, as well as a mass on his right flank. Last May, Aung and his mother sought treatment at the public hospital in Yangon, where he was admitted. There, he underwent tests, including hormone evaluations, along with multiple X-rays of his chest, abdomen, pelvis, and both legs. The doctor informed his mother that a rare congenital condition was suspected, and that amputation might be necessary if there were any changes in his leg color or when he reached six months of age to prevent complications. Oral medications and bi-weekly follow-up appointments were provided. Over time, Aung's leg and scrotum swelling worsened. However, due to ongoing conflict near their village and financial constraints, Aung's parents were unable to attend further follow-up appointments. Doctors now want Aung to undergo an MRI, an imaging procedure that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to produce images of bodily organs. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $968 to cover the cost of Aung's MRI and care, scheduled for January 26th. Aung's mother expressed, "I hope to witness my son's full recovery. His condition brings me immense sorrow, and I do not know why this has happened to him. I would like to extend my heartfelt gratitude to BCMF and the donors for helping my son. Once he receives complete treatment, my wish is for him to excel in his education and achieve success in life."

$968raised
Fully funded