D

Davide Gerbaudo

MONTHLY DONOR

United States

Davide's Story

Davide joined Watsi on September 14th, 2013. Seven years ago, Davide joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Davide's most recent donation traveled 8,600 miles to support Say, a four-year-old boy from Thailand, to fund hernia repair surgery.

Impact

Davide has funded healthcare for 96 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by Davide

Say

Say is a four-year-old boy who lives with his mother, brother, sister, and grandfather in a refugee camp on the border of Thailand. His father returned to Burma to visit his village last year. When Thailand closed its borders because of the COVID-19 outbreak, his father could not come back to the camp. Say's grandfather is an assistant pastor in the camp and he receives his income through donations when he visits his church members for home prayers. Say goes to nursery school while both of his siblings go to primary school. His mother does all the household chores. Every month, their household receives some funding to purchase rations in the camp, which is just enough for their basic needs. They receive free healthcare and education in the camp, but specialized procedures like the care that Say needs are often not possible. In early February 2021, Say developed an inguinal hernia on his right side, which has resulted in swelling and pain. His mother has noticed that since he developed the hernia, his appetite has decreased, as eating more can sometimes cause additional discomfort. Fortunately, on March 25th, he will undergo hernia repair surgery at Mae Sot General Hospital, our medical partner's care center. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund Say's hernia repair surgery. The procedure is scheduled to take place on March 25th and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably. Say's mother said, "When I heard that my son needs surgery, I became so worried because he is the youngest in our family." She is eager for the surgery to be complete and for Say to have healed.

79% funded

79%funded
$1,199raised
$301to go
Vey

Vey is a 34-year-old farmer from Cambodia. Vey has been married for 14 years and has four children, three sons and one daughter. Two of his children attend school, and the other two are not old enough to attend yet. His wife works with him on their farm. Vey lives with his elderly parents, who help care for their grandchildren. In his free time, he likes to help around the house, spend time with his children, help his wife to cook, watch TV, and meet friends for interesting discussions. Two months ago, Vey fell and re-injured his right tibia. He is now suffering from pain that radiates down to his ankle. His ankle is swollen, and dorsiflexion (raising his foot upwards toward the shin) is limited. During his first injury, Vey's family took him to a government hospital for treatment, where doctors secured his tibia by inserting a nail for stability to support healing. The hardware that the government hospital doctors inserted is still in his leg. Now that the bone from the original fracture has healed, the hardware needs to be removed to facilitate healing and minimize the risk of infection. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner, Children's Surgical Centre, can help. On January 15th, Vey will undergo a hardware removal procedure, which will cost $230. This procedure will remove the hardware and be replaced with a cast, which will support healing and help him walk without pain. Vey shared, "I hope that after surgery, my right leg will be free of pain, the wound will heal, and I can walk without pain."

100% funded

$230raised
Fully funded
Min

Min lives with his wife, son, and daughter in a village in Tak Province, Thailand. He moved from Burma to Thailand nine months ago in search of better job opportunities. His daughter is still too young to go to school and his wife and son work as day laborers on a farm, each earning 150 baht (approx. 5 USD) per day. Min had to stop working with his wife and son three months ago because of his condition. Their monthly household income of 3,000 baht (approx. 100 USD) is not enough to cover their daily expenses. Sometimes, they have to borrow money from their relatives to meet their basic needs. Four years ago, Min used to work as a construction worker in Bangkok. One day, he started to experience pain in the left side of his abdomen. He went to a clinic twice and was diagnosed with a kidney stone in his left kidney after receiving an ultrasound. The doctor told him that he would need to undergo laser treatment at a hospital to break up the stone. The next day, Min went to a hospital in Bangkok. He received another ultrasound and underwent laser treatment which he did not have to pay for because he had health insurance at that time. When he returned for his follow-up appointment, he underwent another round of laser treatment, followed by more oral medications to take home. Min was not able to return to the hospital because his father passed away before his next appointment and he had to go back to Burma for the funeral. Before he had a chance to return to Bangkok, his mother also passed away. After spending money on the two funerals, Min did not have enough money to return to Bangkok. He moved back in with his wife and children and started working as a day laborer on a farm with his wife in their village. In May 2019, Min started experiencing pain again in his left lower abdomen. He would also pass small stones about twice a month while urinating. He went to a clinic where he received oral medication as well as an ultrasound. The doctor told him that he has a stone in his left kidney as well as small stones in his urethra. Min went back to the same clinic several times for his follow-up appointments, where he received oral medication each time for his abdominal pain. By September 2019, he was feeling much better and was no longer in pain. He was also no longer passing stones when urinating. Min then stopped going back to the clinic and stopped taking medication. Later in December 2019, Min and his family moved to their current home in Thailand and in May 2020, the pain in Min’s lower abdomen returned. He has pain when urinating and has started to pass small stones again about every two weeks. He went to a local hospital in the beginning of May with his wife, and he received an ultrasound. The ultrasound showed that he now has stones in both of his kidneys in addition to a bladder stone. The doctor referred him to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for treatment, but his family was not able to afford the estimated cost so he returned home. At home, Min told his friend about his condition and his lack of funds to pay for it. His friend told him to seek help at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) and with Watsi's Medical Parter Burma Children Medical Fund. Surgery is now scheduled for August 14th. Min shared, “I had to sell my phone to pay for my treatment [the ultrasounds and oral medications] and my transportation when I sought treatment. For the past few days, we don’t have enough rice and we also don’t have any money to buy more food. So we have to eat rice porridge. I feel so sad for my family.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Aung

Aung is a 15-year-old novice monk from Burma. He stays in the monastery in his village of Hpa-An. His parents own a piece of land where his father and oldest brother grow vegetables and fruits to sell. His family also grows vegetables for their own consumption. Two months ago, Aung developed headaches, and his head increased in size, especially the right side of his head. At that time, his father bought medication from the pharmacy to reduce his headaches. He took it for two days but did not feel better. Later on, his father took him to Hpa-An Hospital where he received a blood test and an x-ray. The doctor told his father to take him to Yangon but his father instead brought him to Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) in Mae Sot, Thailand. On February 25th, Aung arrived at MTC and he was referred to Watsi Medical Partner's Mae Sot Hospital the next day. At MSH, the doctor has recommended a CT scan and also told Aung's father that Aung needs to replace the shunt he received in his head in 2016 that has helped treat his hydrocephalus condition; unfortunately, the shunt is now blocked. The family is hopeful that Watsi supporters may be able to support a shunt procedure as well. Currently, Aung suffers from headaches and the area where he had the shunt inserted into his head is slowly increasing in size. The area of his head that has increased in size is sensitive and he is not able to sleep on his right side. Doctors want Aung to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which x-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This scan will hopefully help doctors further diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $414 to cover the cost of Aung's CT scan and care, scheduled for February 27th. Aung said, "When I lie down and sleep, I can sleep only on one side because the growth hurts if I lay on it." He is hoping to feel better with treatment.

100% funded

$414raised
Fully funded