Kerstin T ReckerMONTHLY DONOR
Kerstin's Story

Kerstin joined Watsi on March 9th, 2021. One year ago, Kerstin joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Kerstin's most recent donation supported Aye Myat, a 34-year-old man from Burma, to fund a CT scan for a mass in his throat.

Impact

Kerstin has funded healthcare for 15 patients in 6 countries.

All patients funded by Kerstin

Aye Myat is a 34-year-old man from Burma who lives with his wife and father in-law in a village in Karen State. He is a subsistence farmer and part-time day laborer. Aye Myat's father in-law is too ill to work and his wife is a homemaker, so Aye works very hard to support his family. In early November 2021, Aye Myat felt like something was stuck in his throat. When Aye Myat checked in the mirror, he could see a lump bulging from the left side of his upper throat. The following month, Aye Myat received a CT scan at a local hospital in Hpa-An. The lump was found to be noncancerous and surgery at a hospital in Yangon would be required to remove the lump. Due to the civil war in Burma, Aye Myat was worried about traveling to Yangon so he instead asked his relatives to arrange safe passage for him to Mae Sot, Thailand. A doctor at Mae Sot Hospital scheduled Aye Myat to undergo another CT scan to confirm the previous diagnosis before scheduling surgery. This additional scan will help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. The mass does not cause Aye Myat pain, but he feels like there is something constantly stuck in his throat, making it hard to breathe and eat at times. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is helping Aye Myat raise $414 to cover the cost of the CT scan scheduled for February 9th. Aye Myat’s wife said, “I told him not to worry so much about his condition being cancer, but he cannot stop worrying. I can understand how he feels and I also worry about him. I hope that he will hear good news when he receives his CT scan result.”

$414raised
Fully funded

Titus is a 22-year-old motorcyclist and is the sixth born in a family of nine: six boys and three girls. His father earns wages from farming and working in other people’s farms, while his mother takes care of their house and family. They live in a two-roomed iron-built house in their village. Two months ago, Titus was involved in a road accident. He was riding a motorcycle that lost brake power and fell into a ditch. Titus sustained lacerations on his knee and fractured his right patella, and was rushed to a nearby district hospital where he was sutured and discharged home. Three weeks later, when he tried to stretch his leg, his wound opened and an X-Ray imaging of his leg revealed an open patella fracture. The doctor has recommended open reduction and internal fixation surgery and skin grafting to avoid further complications and further wound infection. Currently, Titus is in pain and has to use a walking frame to get around. His parents have desperately searched for a solution, but their socioeconomic status with the family of many children in school with fees has limited the options of helping Titus. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On January 13th, Titus will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. This procedure will relieve him of his pain and he'll be able to use his leg once he recovers. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,145 to fund this procedure. Titus shared, "My biggest hope is to get an opportunity to be treated so that I can go home to better my life.”

$1,145raised
Fully funded

Clement is a small-scale farmer from Kenya. He was born and raised in a small village called Bugar where most of the people living in the area are farmers or find other casual jobs. He is married and has six children: two girls, and four boys. He did not attend school and communicates only in his mother tongue, called Keiyo. His family lives in a small mud house with a thatched roof and grows their food from their small farm, which mostly consists of maize and beans. Last week, Clement sustained a severe injury on his right leg after he was involved in a road traffic accident while going to the market. He was a passenger on a motorcycle that lost control and fell into a ditch leaving him and the rider with severe injuries. They were rushed to a nearby hospital where they received first aid and were later referred to our medical partner's care center for treatment. An X-ray revealed an open right tibia fibula fracture. Quickly Clement was rushed to the operating theatre for surgical debridement of wounds and casting. He was admitted to the hospital and is awaiting fracture surgery. He is unable to walk and is in great pain. Clement likes spending his days on his farm and as the breadwinner of the family, he's now feeling distressed because he can’t provide for them due to his condition. He is worried about the obstacles his family would face if his leg is not treated, having also been diagnosed with arthritis. The family doesn’t have funds to pay for his surgery and he's appealing for support. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On January 6th, Clement will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. This procedure will reduce his pain and help him walk easily again. After complete recovery, he will be able to resume his work and support his family. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,145 to fund his treatment to help him heal. Clement says, “I want to be pain-free and healthy. I hope to be happy again and have a good life. My family needs me the most.”

$1,145raised
Fully funded

Arnold is a 40-year-old married man with three children; aged 15, 10, and 3. He is a truck driver and his wife helps take care of their family and home. Since the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic, his work has decreased. Also, his driving license is currently expired which means that he cannot work as a truck driver until he's able to renew the license. Since last year, Arnold has had a chronic cough. He sought medical care and tested negative for Tuberculosis more than four times; he was frequently put on antibiotics. Late last year, he started noticing a protruding swelling on his neck along with his persistent cough. He again sought medical attention from a health center and was referred to the public hospital. At the hospital, they suspected that he had a goiter and was referred to Partners in Hope (PIH) for thyroid tests since the other facility had no reagents for these tests. At PiH, Arnold was diagnosed with goiter. Doctors recommend that he has his thyroid removed in a procedure called thyroidectomy. A goiter is an abnormal enlargement of the thyroid gland; a butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of the neck. Although goiters are usually painless, a large goiter can cause a cough, irritation and may also cause difficulty in swallowing and breathing. Arnold is afraid that his thyroid might grow bigger if he does not have it removed. It is expected that after surgery, the symptoms will heal and his neck will return to its normal size. Arnold appeals for financial assistance as he is not financially able to pay for the surgery. Arnold says, "My worry is that the goiter might grow bigger. I hope to get treatment before the condition worsens."

$1,015raised
Fully funded