Charles B DePue IIIMONTHLY DONOR
Charles' Story

Charles joined Watsi on September 9th, 2014. Seven years ago, Charles joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Charles' most recent donation traveled 8,800 miles to support Dom, a traditional pottery maker from Cambodia, to fund hip replacement surgery so she can walk again.

Impact

Charles has funded healthcare for 88 patients in 13 countries.

All patients funded by Charles

Poe is a 45-year-old man who lives with his wife in a hut in a village in Myawaddy Township in Burma. Poe and his wife are agricultural day labourers, but he had to stop working two to three months ago, when his condition worsened. The income she earns is usually just enough to cover their daily expenses, but if she cannot find work, they have to borrow money to make ends meet. Around seven years ago, Poe got bamboo splinters in his left foot while working on a farm. He was able to pick out the splinters and applied traditional medicine to his foot, which healed. A little while later, he developed pain where he had the splinters before and went to a nearby clinic. A nurse checked his foot but told him that she could not find anything wrong with his foot. The nurse gave him pain medication and Poe went back home. After he took the medication, he felt better. Six or seven months later, his pain returned, and he also developed an infection. When he went back to the clinic, the nurse checked his foot and told him to go to a hospital since he signs of a severe infection. The nurse also gave him medication. He then went to Myawaddy General Hospital, where he had the ulcer cleaned with an antiseptic solution and was given medication. When he went home, he felt better. Two years ago, the pain and ulcer returned but in a larger area then previously. He went back to Myawaddy General Hospital, where he received an x-ray. He was told that his foot was infected due to his previous injury. His foot was cleaned again with an antiseptic solution, and he was given antibiotics. After he took the medication, he felt better again. Just a few months ago, Poe’s foot started to hurt again. However, he was not worried about his foot because the last time his foot had hurt, he had had the ulcers drained. When the pain and swelling increased in his foot, he was no longer able to work. Although he wanted to go to the hospital, he did not have enough money to go this time since he was not working. His brother then told him to go to Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH) in nearby Mon State since it is more affordable. When Poe arrived at MCLH at the end of November, he was admitted after the doctor examined his foot. He received another x-ray and was told that the ulcers and an infection had spread to multiple areas. He was also told that because of how advanced his condition is, his foot could never heal fully, and the only option at this point was to amputate his foot. “I’ve been to many hospitals and clinics already,” said Poe. “The doctor told me that if I amputate my foot my condition will no longer return. So I am happy to go ahead with the procedure.” Currently, Poe’s left ankle and feet is swollen and painful. The pain is worse at night and when the temperature drops. He has multiple ulcers in his foot with discharge and he feels extremely uncomfortable. Some areas of his foot are itchy and painful while he has lost sensation in the top of his foot and areas around his ankle. Cannot put any weight on his left foot due to the pain and has to be pushed in a wheelchair since he arrived at MCLH. He's hopeful about feeling better soon and getting back to working. Poe shared, “In the future I want to buy one or two cows to breed and rear them to earn an income. I also want to grow and sell vegetables."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Alamunyaki is an 11-year-old boy and the fourth born in a family of five children. Alamunyaki is a very social and hard-working boy. He has not had the chance to join school due to his parent’s financial challenges. There is hope for Alamunyaki joining school because one of his uncles has offered to take him and support him in school next year. It is also Alamunyaki’s uncle who decided to seek treatment for his nephew who has burn contracture on his right hand from the elbow all the way down to the wrist and fingers, making it impossible for him to hold things with the hand. Alamunyaki’s parents are small scale farmers of maize and vegetables, which they mostly use for their own consumption and sell what they can of the harvest in order to get money to buy other commodities. They also have a few goats which Alamunyaki and his siblings help their parents in grazing. Alamunyaki was involved in a fire accident when he was two years old. He was at the fireplace with his siblings warming themselves while their mother was preparing dinner. Alamunyaki was dressed in his traditional maasai clothing which caught fire by accident. Alamunyaki sustained a severe burn and needed to be taken to the hospital but due to his parent’s financial constraints they couldn’t take him and treated him at home using herbal and traditional medicines. The skin around the burns has contracted making it impossible for him to use his right hand. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping Alamunyaki receive treatment. On March 3rd, surgeons at their care center will perform a burn contracture release surgery to he will be able to use his. Now, their family needs help to fund this $639 procedure. Alamunyaki’s uncle says: “I would like my nephew to go to school next year but I understand it’s not going to be easy if he does not have his right hand correct. Kindly help him because his parents cannot afford the cost.”

$639raised
Fully funded

Myo is a 16-year-old boy from Burma. He lives with his parents and four brothers in northern Rakhine State. Myo is a student in grade nine and his four brothers also go to school. However, they have been unable to study since the Covid-19 pandemic shut all schools. Myo’s parents are day laborers, and their family's combined income is just enough to cover their daily expenses since Myo and his brothers’ schooling is free. To survive with limited income, they forage for vegetables and fish. If they fall ill, they use traditional medicine, which is more affordable then going to a clinic or a hospital. Myo was diagnosed with a heart condition that involves a malformation of the mitral valve, which is the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. Currently, Myo cannot walk long distances or climb stairs because of his tiredness. Sometimes, he cannot breathe very well. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Myo. The treatment is scheduled to take place on February 7th and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably. Myo shared, “I am worried about my health and I feel sorry for my parents. Because of my health problems, my father had to work more days to earn more money. Also, my mother cannot work because she accompanies me and has to take care of me. I hope my school will reopen soon so that I can go back to school. One day I hope that I can become a teacher. I want to teach because there are not enough teachers in my village.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded