Karijn van der HeijMONTHLY DONOR
Karijn's Story

Karijn joined Watsi on December 13th, 2014. Seven years ago, Karijn joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Karijn's most recent donation traveled 4,700 miles to support Jade, an 18-month-old baby girl from Haiti, to fund cardiac surgery.

Impact

Karijn has funded healthcare for 81 patients in 14 countries.

All patients funded by Karijn

Charity is a 28-year-old woman from Kenya. She is the eldest in her family and is now married and has a newborn baby who is two months old. Her husband works as a clerk at a local dairy factory, where he earns enough to feed their family. Charity was working at the same factory, but was laid off from her job due to the COVID-19 pandemic. She is not currently working and spends her time at home taking care of her child. Since August 2020, when Charity was pregnant, she started experiencing pain in her upper abdomen that radiated to the back. Charity had visited several different health centers but showed no improvement, and later decided to come to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center Nazareth Hospital. She underwent a scan, which showed that she has a large gallstone. The doctor recommended that she undergo a cholecystectomy. Without treatment, Charity's condition may become more complicated and cause her gall bladder inflammation, or a blocked bile duct or pancreatic duct. However, Charity is unable to meet the cost of her care and appeals for financial support. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare. is helping Charity receive treatment. She is scheduled to undergo a cholecystectomy on March 9th at our medical partner's care center. Surgeons will remove the gallbladder due to the gallstone causing pain and possibly infection. This procedure will cost $788, and she and her family need help raising money. Charity shared, "The pain is too much at times and I feel some relief when I vomit. I am hoping to get support so that I can be well and be at peace to nurse my baby."

$788raised
Fully funded

Naw Kwee Moo is a 54-year-old woman who lives with her husband, three daughters and three sons in Mae Ra Ma Luang Refugee Camp in Thailand. She and her family fled to the camp in 2006 from Burma. Today, Naw Kwe is a homemaker and her husband is too ill to work. Five of their children go to school in the camp, four other children have moved away, and she proudly shared that her second oldest son graduated from a post-secondary program in May 2020. Naw Kwe’s family receives 2,030 baht (approx. 68 USD) in a month on a cash card to purchase rations for basic food needs. Although they receive free education and primary health care in the camp, Naw Kwee’s family struggles to make ends meet each month. Four years ago, Naw Kwee started going to the camp’s hospital run by Malteser International (MI) Thailand to receive treatment for urinary tract infections (UTI). Most of the time, she would feel better after taking medication, but she was no longer able to work as an agricultural day labourer. Over the next few years, when she increasingly sought treatment for UTIs, she was diagnosed with chronic UTI. When her condition did not improve after taking antibiotics, a doctor at the camp’s hospital referred her to another hospital in March 2020, where she was diagnosed with a right kidney stone. In June 2020, after a delay due to COVID-19, Naw Kwee was able to get to Chiang Mai Hospital for further treatment. There, doctors confirmed her earlier diagnosis, in addition to hydronephrosis, a condition where the kidney swells due to a build-up of urine. Currently, Naw Kwee takes pain medication whenever she experiences pain or discomfort in the right side of her back from her kidney stone. The pain will usually only last for a day before it disappears, but she feels weak. Sometimes she also has cloudy urine and a mild fever. Her appetite has decreased, but she tries to eat as much as she can. Naw Kwee will need to undergo multiple rounds of laser treatment to break up the stone in her kidney. Her first round of shockwave lithotripsy will be on February 11th. Naw Kwee will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, who requests $1,500 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Once recovered, she will be free of pain and will be able to resume weaving and sewing, which she enjoyed doing before having this condition. Naw Kwee shared, “I’m desperately trying to stop the pain in my back from returning. Because of the pain, I can’t even do household chores properly. I can’t sleep well and sometimes I have difficulty breathing. Once I recover, I’ll no longer feel stressed because of this pain. I’ll be able to enjoy my days even though I have some problems related to aging.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Herrieth is a one-month-old beautiful girl and the firstborn to her young parents who recently graduated from college. Herrieth’s father graduated as a clinical officer, while her mother graduated as a nurse. Unfortunately, both parents have not been able to get an employment opportunity yet. They now help each other make a living through a small business of selling fish in order to be able to raise and take care of their baby. Herrieth was born with a bilateral clubfoot, which her parents were informed is treatable, but due to financial challenges they couldn’t afford the treatment cost. If not treated, Harrieth will not be able to walk properly as she develops and her chances of growing up with disability will be very high. Her parents got to know about Watsi's medical partner and the possibility for their daughter to have her feet corrected, thus they are asking for help. Fortunately, Herrieth's family traveled to visit our medical partner's care center, Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre and The Plaster House. There, surgeons will perform clubfoot repair surgery on January 12th and provide critical follow-up care. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $935 to fund Herrieth's clubfoot repair. After treatment, as she grows older, she will be able to walk easily, run, and play. Herrieth’s mother says: “We would love to see our daughter lead a normal life without the challenges that come along with being disabled. Please help her.”

$935raised
Fully funded

Ivan is a three-year-old boy from Tanzania. He loves playing with his friends, and doesn’t like staying indoors - sometimes, his mother has to force him to rest when he wants to play. Ivan is unable to use his right hand after being involved in a fire accident earlier this year in April. Ivan was outside playing with his friends, and his mother had put a pot of beans cooking on the stove. When it started raining, Ivan came back running into the house and slipped on the wet floor. His right hand went into the pot, burning him badly. Ivan's family took him to the hospital right away for treatment. It took time for his wounds to heal but eventually, they did. However, the burns healed with contractures, which make him unable to straighten his fingers and limit movement around his wrist. Ivan has been scheduled to have surgery, but his parents are unable to afford the treatment cost. Both of his parents have a small business of making and selling local soap, and they also make a living by selling fish. Their income is small, and they do not earn enough for Ivan's cost of care. They appeal for financial support. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Ivan receive treatment. On December 11th, surgeons at their care center will perform a burn contracture release surgery to allow Ivan to use his hand with ease. Once healed, he will be able to use his hand to care for himself, and learn to write when he starts school. Now, he needs help to fund this $874 procedure. Ivan’s mother shared, “Please help my son to get this treatment so that he can be able to write when he starts school. I am not able to afford his needed treatment, please help us."

$874raised
Fully funded

Yin Yin is a 27-year-old woman from Thailand. She lives with with her husband, her sister-in-law, her sister-in-law’s husband, her niece and her niece’s two small boys. Her husband, who is the only one supporting her financially, works as a cleaner at a shopping mall. In her free time, she likes to read Burmese novels. Three years ago, when Yin Yin worked as a cleaner in Bangkok, she felt tired, had no appetite, had memory loss and frequent urination. She was brought to a hospital where she was told she has a blood clot in the back of her head. She had it removed surgically, which her employer lent her money for. On December 6th and 8th, Yin Yin had two seizures. She and her husband sought treatment at Mae Tao Clinic, where she was admitted. She does not remember what happened but was given medication and told to come back if she felt unwell. On January 14th, however, she came back to the clinic, complaining of soreness in the back of her head where her first surgery took place. She also reported continued blurry vision, memory loss and fatigue. When the weather gets cold, she feels stiff and sore in her neck and hands. MTC thought she might have encephalitis but needed a CT scan to confirm her diagnosis. Unable to pay, MTC referred her to Watsi Partner Burma Children Medical Fund for assistance in accessing further treatment. Doctors want Yin Yin to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which x-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose her condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $414 to cover the cost of Yin Yin's CT scan and care, scheduled for January 28th. “It has been very difficult for me, but my husband gives me encouragement,” said Yin Yin.

$414raised
Fully funded