Ryan OksenhornUNIVERSAL FUND MEMBER
Ryan's Story

Ryan joined Watsi on December 25th, 2016. Seven years ago, Ryan joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Ryan's most recent donation supported Ramadhan, a 4-year-old boy from Kenya, to fund clubfoot surgery to allow him to walk and play.

Impact

Ryan has funded healthcare for 93 patients in 13 countries.

Patients funded by Ryan

Hein is a four-year-old boy living in Burma with his parents and sister. His mother is a homemaker while his father works as a second-hand motorbike broker to provide for their family. The family faces financial struggles and Hein's grandparents often step in to offer financial assistance during times of need. Hein's sister is a student, while he stays at home with his mother. When Hein was two years old, his mother noticed that he had a small lump on his right eyelid. He rubbed his eyes frequently, experienced discomfort and sometimes woke up with his eye swollen. His mother took him to a nearby hospital in 2022 and he was given some eye drops and an antibiotic. The doctor further suggested that Hein’s mother take him to an ophthalmology hospital, which specializes in eye care, for further investigation. However, due to security concerns stemming from the civil war and the high costs associated with the journey, Hein's mother was unable to make the trip. As time passed, Hein's condition deteriorated, with increased swelling and itchiness. Presently, his right eye is painful, showing signs of redness and swelling. Hein's mother brought him to our medical partner's care center for treatment. On March 25th, Hein is scheduled for a cyst excision procedure that will provide him relief and improve his vision and eye movement. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund the procedure. Hein’s mother said, "I have been trying my best to seek treatment for him, and even though I cannot afford it, I hoped to find a way for him to get treated. I want him to grow up like other children and enjoy his life. As a mother, I always want the best for him, and I want to support his future ambitions. I am so happy to learn that my son's medical treatment will be supported by donors. I am happy and relieved, and I hope that Hein's condition will be cured."

$772raised
$728to go

Say is a 31-year-old woman who has lived with her family in a refugee camp for more than 10 years after fleeing the conflict in Burma. She is a homemaker who lives with her husband, elderly father, and three young children who are all attending school. The income for Say’s family comes from cash cards provided by an organisation in the refugee camp. Say’s husband works as a delivery driver outside the camp but he has been unable to work since December 2023 because Say’s father and eldest son have health issues that require support. Their monthly income is not enough to cover their living expenses and they sometimes need to borrow food before their cash card is refilled. Basic health care is provided by the International Rescue Committee (IRC) in the refugee camp free of charge, but not advanced care like Say needs. In 2022, Say began having pain, discomfort, and pressure in her abdomen. She was diagnosed with an ovarian cyst and has been advised to undergo a total abdominal hysterectomy which will remove her uterus and cervix. If left untreated, Say's symptoms will continue to worsen and put her at risk for further health complications. Say is scheduled to undergo a hysterectomy on February 22nd. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to cover the cost of her procedure and care. “I will look for a job as a nursery teacher in the camp, I used to do this before I had to stop. Thank you so much to the donors who are helping us pay for my surgery and thank you to BCMF. May you all be healthy, and God bless you,” shared Say.

$1,040raised
$460to go

Kenay is a sweet eleven-month-old baby boy from Ethiopia who loves to play with his mom. He is the fourth child of his parents. Kenay has started weaning and is eating Plumpy Nut, a nutrition supplement donated by the government and organizations to children with malnutrition, as Kenay was underweight. Kenay’s dad is a farmer and has land, but because of the drought, they couldn’t harvest enough, even for the family’s consumption. Initially, Kenay got his emergency colostomy from Sekota Hospital, which was supported by the community. However, he became so sick and underweight that his mother and some family members lost hope in his ability to survive. Fortunately, his mom heard about our medical partner’s care center, BethanyKids, from a social worker, and upon learning that they could get treatment for his condition, their hope increased. Bethany Kids covered the family’s transportation and accommodation to bring Kenay to the hospital, where the medical team first put him on a nutrition program for over four months to treat malnutrition. Now, Kenay’s weight is normal, and he is fit for surgery. Kenay was born with an anorectal malformation, a congenital abnormality that leads to a complete or partial intestinal blockage. He needs to undergo a series of procedures to eliminate bowel dysfunction. The long journey with multiple issues with his colostomy care has significantly impacted the psychological health of his parents, and they are requesting financial assistance with his surgery cost. Kenay is scheduled to undergo surgery to correct his condition on November 22nd. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is requesting $1,500 to cover Kenay’s procedure and care costs. After his recovery, Kenay will no longer experience bowel dysfunction or be at risk of developing health complications in the future. Kenay’s mom said, “I hope my child will get treatment, and I hope he will heal after the treatment. I hope I will see him growing up and start a decent life.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded